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Member

Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 5

Loading combinations TIA/EIA-222-F vs TIA-222-G

03/01/2011 4:01 AM

Hi.

I am trying to understand difference in these standards in loading combinations.

I am living in post USSR country and these codes are not accepted here, but sometimes clients refer to them.

My question is about difference in loading combinations.

Let's put attention to factors for wind loading.

In F version Wo has factor 1.0, in G version the factor is 1.6.

Do I understand correctly that G version is bringing to increasing of wind load for 1.6 times compared with F version? Or maybe there is something I didn't understand?

Here are quotations from mentioned standards:

TIA/EIA-222-F: 2.3.16

Each of the following load combinations shall be investigated when calculating the

maximum member stresses and structure reactions.

D + Wo

D + 0.75Wi + I

Where

Wo - Design wind load on the structure, appurtenances, guys, etc. without ice

Wi - Design wind load on the structure, appurtenances, guys, etc with radial ice

D - Dead weight of the structure, guys, and appurtenances

I - Weight of ice

TIA-222-G: 2.3.2

Strength Limit State Load Combinations.

Structures and foundations shall be designed so that their design strength equals or exceeds the load effects of the factored loads in each of the following limit state combinations:

1.2D + 1.0Dg + 1.6Wo

0.9D + 1.0Dg + 1.6Wo

1.2D + 1.0Dg + 1.0Di + 1.0Wi + 1.0Ti

1.2D + 1.0Dg + 1.0E

0.9D + 1.0Dg + 1.0E

Where

D – Dead load of structure and appurtenance, excluding guy

Dg – Dead load of guy assemblies

Di – Weight of ice due to factored ice thickness

E – Earthquake load

Wo – Wind load without ice

Wi – Concurrent wind load with factored ice thickness

Thanks in advance for your replies.

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Guru

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1212
Good Answers: 73
#1

Re: Loading combinations TIA/EIA-222-F vs TIA-222-G

03/02/2011 11:18 PM

You appear to be comparing Allowable Strength Design (ASD) with Limit States Design (LSD). With ASD, you ensure that members do not exceed allowable stresses under service loads. With LSD (in the U.S.A. it is called Load and Resistance Factor Design or LRFD) the service loads are factored up and you ensure that the factored loads do not exceed the ultimate capacity of the members.

In Canada, LSD is the only method permitted in the National Building Code. In the U.S.A., both methods are permitted. They boil down to almost the same result except that LSD or LRFD can assign different factors to Live Load and Dead Load whereas with ASD, there is no distinction between different types of load.

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Bruce
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Member

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Posts: 5
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Loading combinations TIA/EIA-222-F vs TIA-222-G

03/04/2011 10:13 AM

Thanks a lot, you are correct. I have checked and got confirmation of your opinion here.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/44873985/6-Revisi-TIA-EIA-222-F-G-Article

It is a nice article about comparison of these two standards

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Participant

Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1
#3
In reply to #1

Re: Loading combinations TIA/EIA-222-F vs TIA-222-G

09/11/2011 4:18 PM

Could you please inbox me a copy of TIA-EIA-222-G?

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