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Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member

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Give Me a Technical Advice for White Fume

07/20/2011 12:43 AM

Hello everyone here.

I have a project to construct and to operate the combined cycle power plant and the project consists of the following equipment :

· Total capacity of combined cycle power plant is 1,560MW (780MW × 2Block) and Mitsubishi M501 GAC gas turbines arranged in 2 Blocks configuration (1Block : 260MW × 2GTs plus 260MW × 1ST)

· Small cooling towers will be incorporated to the main circulation water system

(MCWP quantity : Two 50% capacity / Block) used in the condensing and cooling for each ST.

I am afraid that there maybe the occurrence of white fume from cooling towers because it will be equipped in very cold, basin and inland area.

If you have the information to eliminate the white fume of cooling tower or if you know the similar cases like our power plant system, I hope you will give us a good help and detailed technical advice for our environment.

Thank you very much for your reading until now.

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Guru
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#1

Re: Give me a technical advice for white fume

07/20/2011 12:58 AM

Here are some articles on cooling tower plume abatement. Basically, it is just mist/fog, so I wouldn't use the word "fume."

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Give me a technical advice for white fume

07/20/2011 1:05 AM

Thank a lot

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Guru
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#3

Re: Give me a technical advice for white fume

07/20/2011 2:16 AM

Please see also the duplicate thread, in which Ace Boeringa suggests the possibility of an air-cooled tower (radiator). This will avoid plume issues, but may be more costly.

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#4

Re: Give Me a Technical Advice for White Fume

07/20/2011 11:55 PM

Another option is to put part (or all) of your engine intake manifold directly next to the tower exhaust- about 4-5 feet above the fan deck to the bottom of the duct and directly at mid point of the fan by at least full fan width.

The tower exhaust air will be very close to the wet bulb temperature (and saturated- 100% RH) so this will lower the inlet temperature to the turbine a bit, but turbines LIKE cool air and the moisture will actually create a small amount of superheated steam in the engine- enhancing its output a little more.

As a total alternative- my company makes a tower add-on system that cuts water use (and related chemicals) by 20% and tower electrical usage by over 30% during peak design days,and even more during cooler weather PLUS is totally eliminates the flume.

This will not add any power to your engine, but it will also solve your problem, save you money, and be better for the "environment".

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#5
In reply to #4

Re: Give Me a Technical Advice for White Fume

07/21/2011 8:05 PM

Thanks for your good advice.

I understand the lower inlet air temperature can increase the turbine output but I do not know how the white plume (fume) can be eliminated?

In my humble opinion there is a more potential for the ice formation to GT air inlet filter by the moistured and lower inlet temperature air and in cold winter.

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Guru

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Give Me a Technical Advice for White Fume

07/21/2011 10:03 PM

Part of the assumption is that the total cooling tower fan air volume will be MAYBE 40% of the total turbine inlet volume.

During HOT weather, the cooler, humid air will reduce the temperature of the turbine inlet air- say 40% at 78FDB and 100% RH and 60% at 90FDB and 50% RH = 85.2FDB and about 70% RH.

In cold weather, your scenario might occur, because the mixed air temperature would fall below the dew point, so water would be created and likely turn to snow or equivalent, which MIGHT cause a problem.

As an alternate approach-

Your OP mentioned that the generators will be "combined cycle"- essentially a CoGen system where the hot exhaust gas is used to make HP steam to drive a turbine. The exhaust gas, after the coil being used to make hot water to make steam will be about 50F higher than the saturated temperature of the steam.

That means that a system making 300 PSIG steam (422F saturated) would have an exhaust of about 475F.

SO- in warm weather (> 60F), use the "intake" as described with no problems, and below that temperature, use the same duct as an EXHAUST duct- carrying the hot exhaust to above the tower. The 100% exhaust volume will mix with the 40% tower exhaust (now around 60F or so and still 100% RH) to become 356F and WELL below 100% RH- no more flume and the turbine is seeing fairly cold inlet air- very close to its rating point. Everyone wins.

You will only have to install a set of dampers at the inlet (below the TEE that goes to the tower and also to the exhaust duct (which will also have a set of dampers- one to block the "normal" exhaust path (likely vertical) and one (likely horizontal) to allow the exhaust to go to the TEE at the inlet duct. The exhaust velocity can be fairly high- 2500-3000 FPM because the duct will be fairly large which will have very low pressure drop even at those velocities.

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