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Conductive Liquid

04/21/2007 5:47 AM

PLEASE ,I NEED INFOMATIONS ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF LIQUID THAT CAN CONDUCT ELECTRICITY. THANK YOU---VICTORMATTHEWS

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#1

Re: CONDUCTIVE LIQUID

04/21/2007 10:09 AM

What is your requirement Votage/ Current? Wh do you need a lquid?

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#2

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 12:21 AM

Pure water doesn't conduct electricity. In fact, in laser work we try to use de-ionized water, which has about 10-6 Ohms of resistance. This allows the flash chamber to be flooded with cooling water without shorting out the high voltage flash circuitry.

Any impurities in water (salt, etc.) cause it to conduct electricity. What type of conducting fluids are you looking for?

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#3

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 2:36 AM

What do you need it for?

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#4

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 2:55 AM

Copper sulphate is a typical conductive solution used in different applications.

have a look on the following it may be useful

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670019350_1967019350.pdf

Tariq Ziad Khalifa

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#5

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 4:58 AM

salted water

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#6

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 5:34 AM

Between 1956 and 1960 I spent several years trying to find a "conductive" liquid. I was looking for a liquid that conducted as a metal, i.e., with electrons. I was looking for a liquid that had a resistance that varied with length say. Mercury is a good conductor of course but it was no use to me because it was too good a conductor. I believe most liquid solutions that conduct do so by ionic means but that was no good to me either. A Chemist would understand that more than me. I eventually turned to colloids but had no luck there either. I gave up after that.

Best of luck.

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#7

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 8:54 AM

Mercury metal, salt water solution.

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#8

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 12:09 PM

Mercury - (used in switches for years until the poison hysteria) - highly conductive

Salt solutions - conductivity varies

Coloidal Magnetite suspensions in salt solutions - conductivity can be tailored over a surprising range.

What's your application?

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#9

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/22/2007 7:36 PM

Come back to us if you hide away we can not help you.

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#10

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/23/2007 5:08 AM

All waters conduct electricity to some extent, due to the dissolved salts within them. The theoretical limit of purity of water is Kohlrausch Water at 18.8MΩ.cm at 25degC. All other waters have a resistivity less than this. Ultrapure water, as used in the silicon chip manufacturing industry, will have a resistivity (the reciprocal of conductivity) of typically 18.2MΩ.cm at 25degC, with impurities typically in the order of 1 part in 109. Locally, tapwater has a conductivity of around 750µS/cm at 12degC, indicating impurities in the order of 1 part in 2000.

Seawater has a conductivity of typically 50mS/cm at 15degC, though it varies +/-20% across the planet's surface, and that of the Dead Sea is of the order of 10 times this figure at higher temperatures, indicative of the high level of dissolved salts in the water.

For any given water, resistivity/conductivity varies greatly with temperature, which is why a resistivity or conductivity reading is of little value without it.

Other posts have referred to the liquid metal Mercury [Hg]. While highly conductive, Hg has certain characteristics that make it difficult to handle: its density is high, and so is its toxicity.

Liquids that don't conduct electricity include non-polar organic solvents and mixtures of them: paraffin and white spirit are familiar examples.

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#11

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/24/2007 1:02 AM

There is a magnetic liquid on the market. Edmund Scientific sells small, sealed vials of it. I'm just curious if it also conducts electricity without getting all messed up. It might be worth a look.

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#13
In reply to #11

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/24/2007 3:40 AM

Liquid oxygen is paramagnetic. Only below -183°C, though.

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#15
In reply to #13

Re: Conductive Liquid

02/19/2010 1:23 PM

-183 is not true.most of the oxygen gas analyzers for % range use paramagnetic detectors.the temp is always positive for the gas.

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#12

Re: Conductive Liquid

04/24/2007 1:26 AM

If you need the conductivity to remain the same after drying, you may use Chrome or Silver acrelic conductive ink which is available in electronic component stores. With this ink you can also make printed circuit on a piece of plastic, paper, etc...

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#14

Re: Conductive Liquid

07/22/2008 4:55 PM

Potassium hydroxide

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