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Transformer vs. Load

01/13/2012 8:28 PM

If I have a shop, and I have a motor loads, let say 5-5hp, do I need to put a transformer?

What is the effect to the ECs distribution,

What is the effect to the loads if I used it all without transformer?

Thank you

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#1

Re: transformer vs. load

01/13/2012 10:57 PM

Your question is not clear to me. Why do you think you need a transformer?

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#5
In reply to #1

Re: transformer vs. load

01/15/2012 8:59 PM

good day....

because,, if i used that motor simultaneously , what will be the effect if i will not put a transfomer, the nameplate of my motor loads, 230v, single phase..

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#8
In reply to #1

Re: transformer vs. load

01/15/2012 9:12 PM

thanx sir,,

i need the transformer,, because of the voltage rating,, but im thingking, what if i used it simultaneously at full load rating...what the effect to the load and to the tapping point..

thanx

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#2

Re: transformer vs. load

01/13/2012 11:11 PM

It depends on what supply voltage and phase type is as it relates to the motors...

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#3

Re: transformer vs. load

01/14/2012 12:28 AM

It depends on your motor nameplate rating/operating voltage. Suppose in your locality or power company delivered LV 380 volts 3phase and you had your motor at 220V, 3-phase, then basically you will need a step-down transformer to get the voltages that will match to your motor operating voltage at nameplate. But if the power company in your locality delivered the voltage that matched to your motor namplate voltage.. why need a transformer? all you need to do is wire it there with adequate sizes of wires, circuit breaker, overload protection relays, etc..

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#6
In reply to #3

Re: transformer vs. load

01/15/2012 9:04 PM

thank you,,

yes, the supply voltage is equal to the name plate rating of the load,..

but whats bothers me,, if i use simultaneously,, what is the effect to the load...

thanx

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#4

Re: Transformer vs. Load

01/15/2012 5:58 AM

Normally for such a small load transformer is not needed,anyway contact the utility.

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#7
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Re: Transformer vs. Load

01/15/2012 9:08 PM

thank you..

however,, if i used it simultaneously at full load,,, what is the effect to the load,, it will not cause low voltage? and the effect to the tapping point..thanx

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#9

Re: Transformer vs. Load

01/15/2012 10:09 PM

I'm sorry, but you are completely confused, and your questions make no sense.

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#10

Re: Transformer vs. Load

01/15/2012 10:18 PM

So, working this out on the back of my beer glass coaster.......

You have quantity 5, of 5HP motors. 1 HP is approx 750W

All running at full load=5x5x0.75=18.75kW

Singlephase 230V gives 18750/230=81.5A (forget about power factor for now)

That's a bit on the high side and would require a hefty drop line from the public supply to minimise the voltage drop.

If you had a 3 phase supply and ran 2x5HP on phase A, 2x5HP on phase B. and 1x5HP on phase C you could reduce(distribute) the load current to 2x5x750/230=32A on phases A and B and 1x5x750/230=16A on phase C. A lot more reasonable.

We can talk about starting currents and reticulation later.

What other electrical loads are there at your shop?

Are your premises currently served by a singlephase or 3 phase public supply?

What does "EC" mean? Why are you talking about taps at this stage?

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Transformer vs. Load

01/16/2012 12:14 AM

THANK YOU,

EC means, Electric Cooperative.

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#12
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Re: Transformer vs. Load

01/16/2012 12:50 AM

At the beginning you didn't mention how many motors,single or three phase, type of starter etc. If you mentioned we could have solved it much earlier.

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