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Active Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 20

Serpentine Material

02/03/2012 9:37 AM

Dear all,

We use steam to heat up our petroleum tanks and petroleum/water/gas separators. If we use carbon steel, the heat transfer is good enough but the serpentine can not resist too long due to oxidation and corrosion-we have salty water in our crude. If we use stainless steel, the serpentine works long enough but the heat transfer is not good enough because the thermal conductivity of stainless steel is significantly less than the carbon steel.

What kind of material would you advise for this situation?

Thanks.

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Anonymous Poster #1
#1

Re: Serpentine Material

02/03/2012 12:32 PM

UUuummmmm...... i give up ! !

Is the "serpentine" a reptile or an animal of some kind ?

Is it a hose ?

Can it move by itself ?

When you go to order a replacement, does the vendor call the serpentine a different name like "hose" or "snake" or coil...?

Always use the name of the object that is used by the supplier or vendor.

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Active Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 20
#6
In reply to #1

Re: Serpentine Material

02/04/2012 2:06 AM

No, serpentine is not a reptile, it is a kind of snake. In the cold winter nights, it gets cold and we are trying to isolate all of the serpentine snakes to help them live a happy and healthy life...

If somebody is talking about heat transfer, steel, tank, heat loss, separator, steam etc along with serpentine, it is clear that that serpentine is a heat exchanger.

Try to understand before mocking and learn some manner

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Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42294
Good Answers: 1663
#2

Re: Serpentine Material

02/03/2012 12:44 PM

aggie,

Go to Online Materials Information Resource - MatWeb. There you will be able to select the appropriate material for your heat transfer system.

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Active Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 20
#8
In reply to #2

Re: Serpentine Material

02/04/2012 2:10 AM

I will try.

Thanks.

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Guru

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1049
Good Answers: 88
#3

Re: Serpentine Material

02/03/2012 3:33 PM

Stainless steel "serpentine" with more surface. (longer, wider etc) S.M.

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Guru

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Posts: 662
Good Answers: 48
#4
In reply to #3

Re: Serpentine Material

02/03/2012 11:10 PM

Larger bore or wrapped with 1/16" dia. stainless rod spaced 1/16" apart- sort of like fins.

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Active Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 20
#7
In reply to #4

Re: Serpentine Material

02/04/2012 2:07 AM

That sounds reasonable. I will think on it.

Thanks.

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Participant

Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1
#5

Re: Serpentine Material

02/04/2012 1:42 AM

Dear Aggie,

Open the link below and you will find a very good article about material selection for heat exchangers in desalination plants. I think it will help to solve your problem :

http://www.google.com.tr/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=best%20heat%20transfer%20material%20in%20corrosive%20environments&source=web&cd=2&sqi=2&ved=0CDsQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.swcc.gov.sa%2Ffiles%2Fassets%2FResearch%2FTechnical%2520Papers%2FCorrosion%2FCORROSION%2520AND%2520MATERIAL%2520SELECTION%2520IN%2520DESALINATION%2520PLANTS....3.pdf&ei=ONAsT7CvNYPb8QPc5emTDw&usg=AFQjCNHi4aCyefgoovt2YCDFarQKMv0fSQ

On the other hand, energyguru's solution (stainless steel tube with fins) also sounds like a good idea too.

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Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 7968
Good Answers: 284
#9

Re: Serpentine Material

02/06/2012 1:10 AM

'...What kind of material would you advise for this situation?...'

Curponickel, is one of numerous alloys you might consider. Cupronickel is often used in sea water heat exchangers because it is resistant to corrosion in sea water and it has good thermal conductivity.

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Guru

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Bangalore, India
Posts: 725
Good Answers: 23
#10

Re: Serpentine Material

02/06/2012 11:59 PM

The liquid side heat transfer coefficients are so much smaller than the coefficient in the metal that tghe conductiivity of the metal plays no part in the overall coefficient.

Probably there is heavy fouling on one or both surfaces.

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