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Anonymous Poster #1

Piping Design

07/08/2014 8:55 PM

Good day,

I have a 5Hp motor pump and I need to install a 100meters pipeline from the storage tank to our dosing tank, the lift is about 10 meters and and the length is 100 meters, what diameter of the pipe should i use to increase the flow and decrease the friction. and to reduce the working hours of the pump...

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#1

Re: PIPING DESIGN

07/08/2014 9:21 PM

How much liquid do you need to pump?

How often?

"Dosing" implies small amounts but 5 HP can move lots.

Liquid type, SG, temperature and much more detail is needed.

If this is all the information you have a 4" pipe will be overkill, unless you're pumping molasses.

There are web site for this you know, that will do the calculations for you, with the information I asked for.

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: PIPING DESIGN

07/08/2014 10:08 PM

And a pump curve, and viscosity, and what is the fluid?

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#3

Re: PIPING DESIGN

07/08/2014 10:55 PM

As has beeing said you need to provide more data, but actually by the time you figured which data it is you will be able to find the answer yourself.

If in doubt make it big!

And if you make it big, dont worry about the money!

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#4

Re: PIPING DESIGN

07/08/2014 11:01 PM

What you actually need to do (unless you want to figure out the piping losses first and then get a suitable pump) is get a pump curve chart from the manufacturer, and then figure out the combination of piping losses and head loss that will put you on the "knee" of the curve- usually in the middle third of the curve. This will make the pump run more efficiently and likely last longer. If you make it too low resistance (too far to the left of the curve) you may experience cavitation which reduces efficiency and kills pumps.

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#5

Re: Piping Design

07/09/2014 1:36 PM

It depends on how quickly you want to pump it, Mildred! And you can only work that out using the pump's performance curve. Once you have the flowrate, divide by, say, 2 metres per second to get the pipe area, use pi, the number 4 and the square root function to get a diameter, then select the next size up.

If you don't have a pump curve, and a phone call to the manufacturer will usually produce one, then make the discharge pipe the same diameter as the discharge connection, as a first stab at it.

VoilĂ !

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