BRM's Flexible Honing, Surface Finishing, and Deburring Blog Blog

BRM's Flexible Honing, Surface Finishing, and Deburring Blog

BRM's Flexible Honing, Surface Finishing, and Deburring Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about how to solve difficult finishing problems. For over 50 years, Brush Research Manufacturing (BRM) has helped customers use brushing technology to clean, rebuild, and resurface components ranging from engine cylinders to brake rotors to flywheels to firearms. BRM's Blog on CR4 provides real-world examples of how flex hones and wire brushes work. It also evaluates related technologies and invites questions from the community.

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EG33 Vanagon Engine Rebuild - Flexible Honing and Flower Power

Posted September 20, 2011 4:45 PM by BrushResearch

The Volkswagen Vanagon may not look like a "hippie van", but the successor to the iconic VW Bus still sounds like "flower power". The T3 doesn't burn daisies or gardenias, of course, but its underpowered engine seems to chant, "hell no, we won't go".

That's why some VW enthusiasts, especially those who drive Westphalia campers, replace the Vanagon stock engine with a 3.3-liter, 230-hp, 6-cylinder EG33 engine from Subaru. Then there are Westy wunderkind who buy and rebuild EG33 engines. Some are hobbyists and others full-time automotive restoration specialists, but all combine German engineering with Japanese designs and American know-how.

JWPATE of The Samba, a website for VW enthusiasts, recently documented his EG33 rebuild for the world to see. When the crate arrived, the owner of the silver 1984 Westy was "not convinced - but interested enough" in trying an engine swap. Some 20 pages later, his do-it-yourself diary carefully described the "last step" in a key part of the engine rebuild - cleaning the case halves. "Armed" with a 3 3/4 inch, 220 grit (fine) American-made flex hone, JWPATE detailed how he "launched an attack" on the cylinder bores. "The idea was just to clean them well and renew the cross-hatch pattern (which could still be seen from the factory honing)," he explained.

After applying "plenty" of honing oil, the engine rebuilder "started with the plan of giving each bore 20 seconds with the flexible hone". Every application is different, of course, but generously lubricating the flex hone tool and applying 30 to 60 strokes is what we recommend for best results. JWPATE followed this advice, and "only a few minutes later" the cylinder bores were ready for cleanup. "Hot soapy water, then rinse, dry them well, and quickly get on a coating of light oil," he explained.

It's been since spring that JWPATE last posted on The Samba, but that might be a good thing. Hopefully, his summer has been spent camping - in a 1984 VW Westy wagon with a rebuilt EG33 engine.

Editor's Note: CR4 would like to thank Brush Research for contributing this blog entry, which originally appeared here.

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Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: West Coxsackie, NY
Posts: 533
Good Answers: 10
#1

Re: EG33 Vanagon Engine Rebuild - Flexible Honing and Flower Power

09/21/2011 2:53 AM

Brings back memories of my youth! Oh my, how old I am. I'd like another 25 years...

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