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Left2MyOwnDevices

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About Don Dingee

An experienced strategic marketer and editorial professional, and an engineer by education, Don is currently a blogger, speaker, and author on social computing topics, and a marketing strategy consultant. He's had previous gigs at Embedded Computing Design magazine, Motorola, and General Dynamics.

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Bring Your Own Device, Lawyers, and Money

Posted October 31, 2011 3:00 PM by dondingee

It's surprising how much corporate IT technology is driven by the CEO asking "why not?". In today's episode, it's the CEO asking why he can't be a cool kid and use his new, shiny smartphone or tablet at work. (Stop groaning.)

The blurring of work and personal life has spilled over into smart mobile devices being viewed as work tools. It's seemingly the smart thing to bring your own device - BYOD - to work.

But we're not there yet. Verizon's VP of strategy asked for a show of hands at a recent talk. "How many of you bring your own device?" About half the hands in the room went up. "OK, how many of you do that in a sanctioned manner with employer approval?" About 2/3rds of those hands went down, with sheepish looks.

The sentiment is out there, and as a technologist I know I've had this thought:

"If you don't pay for my device, you don't tell me what to carry. My (blank) is better than what you're trying to give me."

There are rules when it comes to corporate IT, and with good reason. When access, workflow, storage, and policies get more difficult and expensive to implement and manage, and the more sensitive the enterprise data is, and the more often the mobile device is in the flow, there are a lot of things to think about.

Thinking is the last thing people tend to do when something looks easy. I remember in Web 1.0 when the big corporation I worked for put in a way-cool Oracle 11 implementation, and one of the selling points was the apps are web driven, so people will be able to access them with a browser. So, why can't our supply chain partners use it if we issued them logins? Good question, let's try it from home and see if we can get in. Denied. Port numbers. Firewalls. IT security types at corporate:

"You wanna open what port? Why? Bzzzzt. Thanks for playing."

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Re: Bring Your Own Device, Lawyers, and Money

11/01/2011 10:29 AM

"If you don't pay for my device, you don't tell me what to carry. My (blank) is better than what you're trying to give me."

I have to say I have used this. The phone that the company (100+ employees) where I worked only had (2) lines, one main phone, one fax. The rest in the office were supplied with their own cell phone. (it looked like a brick) The service had poor coverage. Included where I lived or at some of the job sites I went to.

To over come this, I had forward the company calls to my personal phone which helped considerable, When customers had process issues calls came all time of the day, worked great at night. (Great for the customer that is)

Of which the company had contacted their provided who cell phone supplied the service and had them investigate, which the provider denied that this is true, that there was full coverage.

After being issued a corrective action from the company,I stopped it, then they were complaining that I didn't answer the phone, Customers were calling me on my personal phone, I do not now how they got it the number, but I sure I gave it to them because of the relationship I had

The company told me to stop it immediately of which I was more than happy to . An then they wondered why I did not answer my phone after hours. They even sent a sales guy over on a Saturday to bitch at me and to answer my phone of which I told him to look at his reception bars.......... "0".

When the company started calling me on my personal phone, I also drew a line and told them to stop using up my minutes, to use the company phone. I have to say I didn't fit the company culture and left.

Interesting to say, the customers followed me.

Did I abuse it, I received and sent messages to and from vendors that may not have been 100% job related that amounted to no more than small talk that would normally occur on the phone.

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