Left2MyOwnDevices Blog

Left2MyOwnDevices

The new stories of social computing are shared here. We're exploring mobile devices, embedded computing, wireless sensor networks, and social business from the perspectives of technology, business, and societal changes.

About Don Dingee

An experienced strategic marketer and editorial professional, and an engineer by education, Don is currently a blogger, speaker, and author on social computing topics, and a marketing strategy consultant. He's had previous gigs at Embedded Computing Design magazine, Motorola, and General Dynamics.

Previous in Blog: Obituary for a Brain Bucket   Next in Blog: Facebook, and Defining Return on Illiquation
Close
Close
Close
2 comments

Inherit the Screen

Posted August 02, 2012 12:00 AM by dondingee

The Apple v. Samsung trial is no more solely about innovation than "Inherit the Wind" was solely about evolution. Both stories - and, the trial is weaving quite a story - involve the attempt to bring facts to bear on a theological position ingrained in culture, but have a much wider implication.

In "Inherit the Wind", the setting is a fictionalized version of the trial of the 20th Century - The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes. The core issue is retained: a discussion of the teaching of evolution versus creation in public schools. For authenticity and drama, the story draws heavily on actual transcripts of legal arguments made during the trial, some of the most colorful dialog in history from two of the great orators of the time, William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow.

But the backstory of "Inherit the Wind" revolves around the troubled times of McCarthyism and the assault on free speech in the name of preventing the spread of communism. That context is slowly being lost as generations pass, and distant memories of a past where blacklists existed fade into history. Without weighing in on which side was right, my only point is: the story wasn't about what it appears to be about to the casual viewer.

Neither is the Apple v. Samsung trial, and that's important to understand if you're working in high tech.

View the Whole Article

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 22955
Good Answers: 416
#1

Re: Inherit the Screen

08/02/2012 8:04 AM

Interesting, here is one of many issues where protection by patents lack.

This excerpt:

First, there's a lot of humor in searching for jurors in the Bay Area who don't own an iOS or Android device, and don't have a patent, or haven't heard of open source.

Good luck on that one.

Back to patents, the laws will have to change quite radically, even the foundation of how its is protected and the type of artwork as well as how the artwork is achieved.

As is, the one with the most $, is going to win, and as far as this being settled, allot is at stake here. If it is settled, it is only going to be to avoid bankruptcy by the party with the less financial reserves.

__________________
“ When people get what they want, they are often surprised when they get what they deserve " - James Wood
Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Geelong, Australia
Posts: 1084
Good Answers: 54
#2

Re: Inherit the Screen

08/03/2012 12:40 AM

According to some writers (I think Steven J Gould) the ACLU actually wanted to lose the "Scopes" trial so they could re-challenge the decision in a Federal court and get the result to apply nationwide.

I understand this issue is still being played out in US courts, so much for universal education.

__________________
If there's something you don't understand...Then a wizard did it. As heard on "The Simpsons".
Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 2 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Obituary for a Brain Bucket   Next in Blog: Facebook, and Defining Return on Illiquation

Advertisement