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Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

Posted November 06, 2013 9:49 AM by HUSH

I'm a self-professed germ-o-phobe. Technically I'd be a called a mysophobe, as in I'm someone who lives in fear of contamination from viruses and bacteria. As long as you can't call me 'sick,' then I'm indifferent to the namesakes. Though my stress hasn't reached OCD-type levels, I'm the first one to squirt the hand sanitizer when I walk past it in the office. If someone around me sneezes more than once, I immediately take two steps back. In the winter, I won't touch my own face without washing my hands first. A vitamin C and a multi-v accompany my breakfast every morning. If it was up to me, I'd live in my own hyperbaric bubble from November until April.

It used to be that an adolescent fear of needles prevented flu shots, so I'd take extra care to stay out of the way of influenza. After [more than] a few years and several tattoos, the needles aren't so scary. The flu shot is a proactive and sensible way of protecting myself. It was the next logical step of my mysophobia.

But seriously, where the heck is my rhinovirus vaccine? I've come to grips with the fact that my school-teaching girlfriend is probably going to get me sick with a cold once or twice a year. The fact that this is now an accepted inevitability is major progress for my mysophobia.

Afterall, each year the World Health Organization expends considerable resources to prepare for the next expected influenza outbreak. By February the organization provides drug manufacturers with two lists, one apiece for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, which outlines which three or four flu strains are going to be prevalent the following winter. Almost immediately production begins on vaccines for next year. Evidence suggests that a flu shot reduces a person's chances of infection by 60%. Newer vaccines are seemingly more expensive each year (up to 30%).

While protecting the public from influenza, a virus which still claims 500,000 lives each year, is a noble feat, it's not done for free. This year, drug manufacturers are expecting around $3.7 billion in revenue from newer four-strain flu vaccines. Innovative manufacturing techniques may yield even higher cost recapture. So, it's a surprise that drug manufacturers haven't been able to capitalize on the mostly-innocuous common cold.

Recent research suggests that a rhinovirus vaccine may be developed in the near-future. There are three families of rhinovirus: A, B, and C. Rhinovirus C escaped the scrutiny of drug researchers until 2007, when it was first discovered. Types A and B are easily cultured in lab environments, but C remained hidden until advanced gene sequencing discovered the virus existing within the same cells as A and B.

Previously, gene sequencing techniques allowed scientists to analyze and map types A and B. To combat these types of rhinovirus with a vaccine, the molecule's external protein structure needed to be mapped. Anti-viral drugs work by attaching themselves to weak points of the virus's structure. So while the surfaces of rhinoviruses A and B have been mapped for years, it wasn't until last month the surface of rhinovirus C was determined. Types A and B were mapped via X-ray crystallography, but type C was charted in a computer simulation using bioinformatics and the genetic sequences of 500 type C genomes.

This is advanced medical research, so there is no timetable for when a cold vaccine could become available. Furthermore, it would likely be some type of proactive injection which contains the vaccine for a spectrum of rhinoviruses.

So what will it take to get an effective rhinovirus drug? First-likely another division of the World Health Organization to monitor the trends of rhinoviruses and make a best guess as what is to come. Second, a drug manufacturer will need to pony up the $700 million, give or take, that it takes to develop a new drug and send it to market. Furthermore, this drug will need to be inexpensive for the patient, since cold symptoms are relatively mild, and have almost no side effects. Drug corporations could expect a capital expense of nearly $1 billion when all is said and done.

So there it is. Why am I going to stuck in bed, hacking, blowing, and sneezing? Because of business strategy. Seriously.

Resources

U of Wisconsin--Madison - Model virus structure shows...

NY Times - Cure for the Common Cold?...

CNN - Better flu vaccine on the horizon


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#1

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/06/2013 10:31 AM

We love you long time....

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#2

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/06/2013 12:50 PM

There is a theory that most of our allergies are due to too much cleanliness.
My Mum used to say " you eat a peck of dirt before you die'
Del

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Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/06/2013 1:08 PM

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#4

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/06/2013 7:13 PM

Xanadu Hotel in Grand Bahama Is empty. Howard Robard Hughes, Jr. (December 24, 1905 - April 5, 1976) lived on the top 2 floors, there as solitaire. Hurry.

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#5

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/07/2013 8:47 AM

"That which does not kill us makes us stronger."

Friedrich Nietzsche

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#6

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/07/2013 8:48 AM

You need to hit on a new learning curve and start with the best of nutrition to build your immune system. Besides the highest quality food you may learn about some supplemental products that also build the immune system. Avoiding pathogens is next to impossible so get involved with the real world and build your immune system to take care of the inevitable. Reishi Mushroom is one potent immune system builder but do your own research and be aware that the flu vaccine has never been proven to aid in fact those that get the flu after a flu shot have more severe symptoms.

While you are at it get on some brain food such as coconut oil, vit D, a product called true hope or st john's wart. This may help clear up your ability to think in a rational manner.

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#9
In reply to #6

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

05/25/2015 7:04 PM

Eat your alfalfa sprouts!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothiocyanite

Open wiki and scroll down to 'efficacy'.

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#7

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/22/2013 1:23 PM

Until that vaccine comes along... (Flu vaccines can be hit or miss, since the virus of any one season may not be the one active in the upcoming season and since more than 200 viruses can cause the common cold, a one-size fits all may not happen.)

A few years ago I began to experiment to develop a protocol that, now works for me... so far. And after a couple of seasons, I feel more confident in my approach, which includes both forms of ascorbic acid -- regular and liposomal (gel in packets works better than encapsulated, which takes longer to get in the system) -- as well as a couple of other measures, I don't worry too much about winter infections even though, as a diabetic viral infections can be quite a bit more unpleasant if one succumbs; especially flu types and bronchitis. That helped provide the incentive to work at it.

One key is beginning "treatment" of any infection as early as one can identify infection -- i.e., tiredness accompanied by nasal discharge, etc. I usually mention to any associate when they come down with "something," that they might want to experiment with nutrition, especially vitamin C, for future reference. Having an understanding how both forms work is helpful for experimenting. For regular, oral C (pure powder without excipients), smaller doses (500mg-2g, experimenter's choice) spread out across several hours -- or as long as necessary -- but at regular, 30 minute intervals is more effective than a couple of large doses separated by a few hours. Bowel tolerance may become a factor to observe in adjusting dosage. The lipsomal form is more forgiving. Due to a much higher rate of absorption and effectiveness to a developed, manifested infection, large doses (2-4 packs) every couple of hours is encouraged. It also doesn't seem to produce bowel tolerance effects.

It might take any individual a bit of experimentation to figure out a protocol that works in their case. But I'm convinced that it can be done for most people. I just don't find many willing to give it a try. Most seem content to mask symptoms with man-made pharmaceuticals and let the infection run its course per their immune system status. I think that acceptance need not be fatalistic.

One associate who did accept the suggestion a couple of years ago, now swears by the lipsomal C, but thinks the regular form is more marginal and not as preventative as he expected. When he complained of that recently (he was getting a cold already) I found out he was not taking smaller doses at smaller intervals. He seems content, though, to get sick and then shorten it with the liposomal form. Whatever.

Zinc is also helpful as it figures in immune system status.And as roy hammy says, one has to be attentive to nutritional intake, across the board. Although some studies do not support the idea, I think it appeals to common sense. One document addressing this in some detail was published by the WHO in 1968.

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#8
In reply to #7

Re: Business: The Cause of the Common Cold

11/22/2013 2:17 PM

A colleague walked in as I was about to add a link to a shorter article/paper than the WHO monograph. After he left, my editing time had expired. So here it is.

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