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Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

Posted November 01, 2015 12:00 AM

This month's Challenge Question: Specs & Techs from IHS Engineering360:

Northern Australia gets hit by several tropical cyclones every year, as does the Philippines. Directly between Northern Australia and the Philippines lies Indonesia which almost never experiences any tropical cyclones. Why?

And the answer is:

The Earth rotates faster at the equator than near the poles because the Earth is wider at the equator. This causes the Coriolis effect, an apparent deflection of moving objects when measured within the Earth's spinning reference frame. This is the reason why tropical cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere spin counter-clockwise and in the Southern Hemisphere spin clockwise. Any tropical cyclone that straddles the equator (and thus is in both the North and South Hemispheres at the same time) tries to spin both clockwise and counterclockwise, and rips itself apart. In addition, the clockwise moving storms are deflected south while the counter-clockwise storms are deflected north. The result is a "no fly zone" for tropical cyclones close to the equator, which is where Indonesia lies.

See image below:

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Guru
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#1

Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/01/2015 12:42 AM
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#3
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Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/01/2015 10:30 PM

As oceans are not isolated but connected together why there are different levels of salinity in different parts of the oceans.

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#5
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Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/02/2015 3:15 AM

The same reason why CO2 is not equally distributed in the atmosphere.

And also the same reason why it is not equivalent hot or has the same pH value anywhere.

The main components of this behaviour are space and time and evaporation.

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#6
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Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/02/2015 5:14 AM
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#13
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Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

12/16/2016 6:18 PM

Why is the water hotter under the tap by your feet when you add to the bath water and cooler behind you in the tub? The water is connected around your body.

Some folks, myself included stir the water to mix it.

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#2

Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/01/2015 6:51 AM

It's too close to the equator. Coriolis makes cyclones spin. Coriolis doesn't work at the equator.

    Indonesia/Coordinates
    6.1750° S, 106.8283° E
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#4
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Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/01/2015 10:56 PM

That's it. Although just like anywhere tropical and near the sea you get localised squalls.

The coordinates for Indonesia are not a point.....just saying.

The islands bust up the open water too so energy doesn't build up without periodic dissipation. There are a lot of clouds filled with rocks in that part of the world.

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#8
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Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/02/2015 7:08 PM

I have heard of this phenomenon. Also fish and frogs. Never really believed it, so can you say that you have seen this for yourself?

At one time people claimed to have seen frogs, pterodactyls and modern artifacts emerge from coal either in the mine or the home. Then as cameras became readily available these stories disappeared and the rise of UFO's took its place. Now it is immunisation and GMO affecting kids.

It would certainly cause me some consternation if you were to say that you had experienced stones in the sky! Clearly i am putting trust in a fellow CR4er and i am not sure i would do that for all on here.

Jim

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#7

Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/02/2015 5:58 AM

Is there a clue in the name: "tropical cyclone"?

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#9

Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/03/2015 10:39 AM

The West flowing component of the Global Conveyor Belt of ocean current near the surface which is warm passes through Indonesia and even though it reverses direction for a short time continues to flow through the islands while several other local currents converge and get turned different directions depending on the temperature of the season.

Australia's EAC - East Australian Current and the Kuroshio Current that hits the Philippines are instead interrupted and disperse into smaller currents traveling North and South. Any storm riding the currents has to confront landfall at a time when its ride gets stopped instead of a steady flow through The Indonesian Islands chain.

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#10

Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/03/2015 11:56 AM

What's all this talk of ocean currents: the critical thing is the wind.

Indonesia lies in the intertropical convergence zone:-

otherwise known as the DOLDRUMS

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#12
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Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/03/2015 4:45 PM

Interconnected my friend. Where did you think the winds got their strength and momentum?

If the winds just conformed to speed of rotation of the earth at different latitudes and the heat from the sun's angle striking the planet then all the winds would be in the same direction for their region and season every day. No storms. No change from one year to the next.

Out at sea you can observe rain falling over land (Cumulus cloud cover) and on a very hot clear day evaporation pulling moisture from the sea to form those clouds.

Hurricane prediction paths are all based on the surface water temperature as the storm passes over currents. Your colored diagram would suggest that the wind always blows in the direction depicted. T'aint so. Ever hear of a Northeaster?

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#11

Re: Tropical Cyclone No Fly Zone: Newsletter Challenge (November 2015)

11/03/2015 1:12 PM

the geographical position beyond the equator

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