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Extreme Enzymes Clean with Less Water

Posted December 30, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

A startup company in California is producing a new class of ultra-stable enzymes that could slash the amounts of water used to clean equipment in the food processing industry. Made from extremophiles, or microbes that thrive in hot and acidic volcanic waters, the enzymes reportedly fared well in field trials where they took the place of chemicals, effectively removing contaminants and also reducing water use by almost 30%. The enzymes are also biodegradeable, making wastewater from the cleaning process reclaimable.


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Guru

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#1

Re: Extreme Enzymes Clean with Less Water

12/31/2015 4:11 AM

Please explain how an "ultra-stable" enzyme can at the same time be biodegradable.

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Guru
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#3
In reply to #1

Re: Extreme Enzymes Clean with Less Water

12/31/2015 11:35 AM

It can be "ultra-stable" to hot water, and certain bacteria (under less stringent conditions) could still engulf and consume it. If the enzymes are good for certain jobs like hydrolysis of vegetable oil resins (burned on unsaturated oils), hydrolysis of bacterial extracellular material (ECM), then cleaning is much more facile.

Frankly, I do not think this will replace detergents in our immediate event horizon.

At the same time, it might help reduce rinse water consumption, but how does one know the effects of humans ingesting traces of these enzymes, or do we do this already by accident?

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Power-User

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#5
In reply to #1

Re: Extreme Enzymes Clean with Less Water

01/01/2016 5:05 PM

What is not explained is what TEMPERATURE WINDOW the enzyme is stable in. So while the enzymes created from volcanic pools are stable at high temperatures, at low temperatures they may be brittle and easy to break down into consumable parts.

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Guru
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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Extreme Enzymes Clean with Less Water

01/04/2016 9:38 AM

There is a distinct difference between thermal lability, and bio-lability from organisms not present in the volcanic vent.

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Member

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#2

Re: Extreme Enzymes Clean with Less Water

12/31/2015 8:31 AM

I also imagine that the FDA will approve them before any testing for health persistence problems show up because they have not been proven to pose a risk.

No testing = No proven risk. Our government's solution to big business needing to produce more consumables.

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Guru
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#4
In reply to #2

Re: Extreme Enzymes Clean with Less Water

12/31/2015 12:08 PM

Now, now, let's not be cynical and simultaneously skeptical of our awesomely socialistic govmint agencies. Why, our govmint has been passing all these standards before your were born.

The very idea that you a mere citizen would question our beloved govmint is simply "beyond the pail".

If the delivery truck for the enzyme product is driven by a man in black with a strange little screwdriver shiny thing, watch out for the memory wipe.

(I hope you do realize by now that my entire response to your post has been brought to you by Stewart Company, and our brand new SPOOF(NTM) detergent.) This whole thread reminds me of the time my dad told this Yankee at the Painted Desert in Arizona that the bush he was asking about was Guayule (pronounced "why Ole"), then dad continued by telling him it was a source of rubber latex and a "bio-fuel" (substitute for grease wood) among other "lies, half-truths, and innuendos about govmint programs".

Parthenium_argentatum

Now there are at least two companies that support the production of selected strains of Parthenium argentatum for hypoallergenic latex rubber (for surgical gloves). Mention was also made of its use as a potential bio-fuel crop in marginal crop areas where other crops have insufficient water.

See? You just never know where a "wild" story might lead.

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