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Fiber Reinforcement for 3D Printing

Posted March 05, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Not so long ago, few would have predicted the integration of so many manufacturing technologies into 3D printing processes, the latest being fiber reinforcement. Engineers at the University of Bristol recently demonstrated a method that uses ultrasonic waves to position millions of microscopic glass fibers which are then cured by lasers in epoxy resin. The process, which is said to be fast and cheap - achieving print speeds of 20 mm/s - can be added to an off-the-shelf 3D printer (see video).


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Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Pune
Posts: 13
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Re: Fiber Reinforcement for 3D Printing

10/14/2016 6:42 AM

Fiber-Reinforced Nylon materials are intended to print parts with the quality of metal. You can now 3D print parts with a higher quality to-weight proportion than 6061-T6 Aluminum, up to 27x stiffer and 24x more grounded than ABS.

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