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Fire Can't Crack New Concrete

Posted March 18, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Concrete is one of the oldest building materials known to man. It also loses its structural integrity when exposed to fire. But Engineering360 reports that Swiss scientists have invented a fire-resistant, high-performance concrete that is also self-compacting. Rather than chip, crack, and even flake up when exposed to the extremely high temperatures brought on by fire, this concrete utilizes, in part, a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer additive to maintain its load-bearing capacity, thus preventing a building's total structural collapse.


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#1

Re: Fire Can't Crack New Concrete

03/21/2016 9:33 AM

So, then, could one build a firebox out of this? How about a boiler furnace?

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#2

Re: Fire Can't Crack New Concrete

03/21/2016 5:46 PM

I understand that this concrete could work well as a wall or a preformed panel where it is not in fixed contact with other material.

My concern is that from the fire incidents that I have had to attend the problem has often been the different expansion rates of joined materials. An example of this would be a brick and mortar wall. The wall is still standing after the fire has passed but the bond between bricks and mortar is gone so the whole wall is very unstable. I could be wrong but the problem seems to be the different expansion rates of the mortar and the bricks.

I am sure this product would have useful applications but it may also have its limitations.

I haven't seen anything about the strength or permeability of this product but I suppose it is still in the development phase.

BAB

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#3

Re: Fire Can't Crack New Concrete

03/21/2016 10:17 PM

I used to use concrete paver blocks to line the firebox of my wood stoves. At 8X16 by and inch and a half they fit perfectly. And an 8X8 fit in the end. I thought they would break down when exposed to the heat. They held up better than regular firebrick and were a lot cheaper too.

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Fire Can't Crack New Concrete

03/22/2016 8:52 AM

Thank you Charlie! Great input! I am planning a small furnace box that will include a wood gasifier section (panel in panel of iron). Another one I am planning will combust the gases released from electrolysis reactor, to heat coils and make steam, as part of a comprehensive calorimetry experiment with a certain class of electrolysis system.

Using concrete pavers makes a lot of cents.

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