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Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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From the Toolbox #7

Posted June 06, 2016 10:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: toolbox Tools what is it

This week's stumper is a pair of specialty pliers designed for a specific purpose. It performs a function that is seldom necessary today.

Initially looking like 6-1/2 inch snap ring pliers, this tool has slotted jaws instead of the normal clamps that would hold interchangeable points for snap rings. The slotted jaws are intentionally skewed at 90 degrees to each other in order to hold or pinch something very thin in diameter when pinched together.

Behind the jaws is a stud with a ball on the end that retains the removable t-handle that comes with the tool. The t-handle is key here: It pivots 360 degrees on the shaft and the bottom of the t-handle near the pliers has a raised step about ¼ of the way around its base. The t-handle, when installed on the shaft, leaves ¼ of an inch at its base, which lines up correctly with the opening on the jaws when the tool is compressed.

The pliers' action is very compact; the handles only move ¾-inch from fully closed to open. I have used this tool several times before and it works well, but it is one of those tools you absolutely need for certain jobs that later collects dust waiting for another classic car or motorcycle or lawn mower project to come along again. It was manufactured by the KD Tool Company in the USA and has a patent number on it as well.

More pictures and the answer on Hemmings Daily.

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#1

Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/06/2016 10:43 AM

Something to do with setting the points?

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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/06/2016 12:54 PM

Yeah, that was my guess. or castrating meercats
Del

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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/06/2016 10:42 PM

Piston Ring Installer, I think. But I can't tell for sure. I looks like the tool for expanding them so they'll slide down the circumference of the piston, and can then be released into the ring groove.

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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/06/2016 11:13 PM

Looks like a spring stretcher to me.

It would hold the spring in a stretched position while it was installed into place.

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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/07/2016 2:38 AM

Drum brake spring tool???

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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/07/2016 3:12 AM

For fitting a throttle cable to carburetor slide type. ( mostly spring loaded)

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#7

Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/07/2016 5:10 AM

I had a pair of those once, don't know where they went.

They are called cable coilers, used for shaping the end of solid core cables for all sorts of things like your lawn mower throttle cable, heater controls etc.

The plier part holds the wire firmly while the T handle shapes the wire into a tight helix, the height of which is dependent on how many times you turn the key. The key rises up the post as the coil progresses.

You can see a small pin located adjacent to the coil forming post for the purpose of bending the wire so that the coil is central to the core of the sheath, this is done once the coil has been formed.

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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/07/2016 10:09 PM
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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/07/2016 6:49 AM

I'm guessing.The T bar bit holds something like a nipple on the end of a (heavy) spring return cable cable, and when turned, pulls the cable to the desired position, (against spring tension) at which point the pliers grip the cable to hold it in place whilst some other action is taken.

Like in my old motor bike days trying to put the clutch cable nipple back in the slot in the hand grip.

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Re: From the Toolbox #7

06/07/2016 8:19 AM

That would be handy, and could be used today.

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