Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Previous in Blog: Year, Make and Model – 1977 AMC Pacer   Next in Blog: Even with Removal of Racecar Language From Final EPA Ruling, SEMA Pushes Pro-Racing Campaign
Close
Close
Close
2 comments

Waste Not, Want Not

Posted August 31, 2016 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto racing restoration

“Waste not, want not” sounds like it probably came from Benjamin Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanack, but it could very well have been the motto of working-class Americans who lived in the shadow of the Great Depression—car folk in particular. That ethos is still going strong with some who grew up in times of abundance. Take Lafayette, New Jersey hot rodder John Knas, for example, whose ’27 Ford roadster started out with a drivetrain many would have passed over.

John and his girlfriend Candace Connell are regulars at The Race of Gentlemen in the gray Model T, which features a 1951 or ’52 Chevrolet 216-cu.in. six-cylinder that John picked up for free when a friend elected to re-power with a Small Block Chevrolet V-8. The 92-horsepower, Babbitt-bearing straight six dressed up nicely with vintage speed parts and Wayne dress-up goodies. Its 1937-vintage design looked right at home among the Ford flathead V-8’s and four bangers on the beach at TROG.

This classic hot rod beach racer was rebuilt from the tires up.

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru
Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member Engineering Fields - Marine Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Vancleave, Ms about 30 miles inland from Biloxi and the coast
Posts: 3199
Good Answers: 105
#1

Re: Waste Not, Want Not

08/31/2016 3:31 PM

Waste not, want not has been part of my 81 year old life. I learned at a very early age to never wast; eat everything on your plate; learn to utilize everything; save for a rainy day, etc. Although I've been accused of being frugal and cheap, I manage to live comfortably with much less money. By keeping to my principals, I eat better than most people who have much more money than I. Take this example: I save chicken bones from my past dinners and when I have accumulated about 2 chickens worth of bones, I make a robust broth. This is what most people throw away. I learned this a long time ago when restaurants would throw away the chicken wings; I got all the wings I wanted because my father was in the restaurant business. I learned they mad a hearty soup. Today, the price of chicken wings is $2.00 a pound. How do you think the soup companies make their soup? They use the parts of the chicken that remains after processing; the same parts that most people throw away. Because of my frugalness, me and my family enjoy a high standard of living. I have old appliances, tools that are over 30 years old, but still in good condition. Why do I have to toss it in favor of a new shiny one that will not last a year. People throw away at least half of their income just to be "fashionable" or in "keeping up with the Jones'es", or for convenience sake.

Of course waste not, want not is the enemy of companies that make consumer goods. To make money, first you have to create a market and that is done by making things that have a limited life. Henry Ford learned that early on when he introduced the model T. Because it was so reliable, owners kept them and didn't buy a new one. He realized if his car was "too" reliable, he would soon go out of business for lack of new sales. That has been how manufacturing has gone ever since; don't make it last too long.

__________________
Mr.Ron from South Ms.
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: About 4000 miles from the center of the earth (+/-100 mi)
Posts: 9086
Good Answers: 1034
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Waste Not, Want Not

09/01/2016 3:22 PM

I once knew a man who was so frugal that he had the first nickel he ever made and had squeezed it so hard that the Indian was riding the buffalo!

Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 2 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Year, Make and Model – 1977 AMC Pacer   Next in Blog: Even with Removal of Racecar Language From Final EPA Ruling, SEMA Pushes Pro-Racing Campaign

Advertisement