Medical Equipment Design Blog

Medical Equipment Design

The Medical Equipment Design Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about medical grade materials and products, electrical and electronic equipment, computers, imaging & software, and home healthcare & diagnostics as used in the medical industry. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Previous in Blog: Implants Connect Using Wi-Fi   Next in Blog: Researchers Generate 3D Virtual Reality Models of Unborn Babies
Close
Close
Close
2 comments

Green Light for First Artificial Pancreas

Posted November 10, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

A hybrid, closed-loop insulin delivery system, dubbed the first artificial pancreas, recently received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. Developed by Dublin, Ireland-based Medtronic, the MiniMed 670G automatically monitors blood glucose and administers appropriate basal insulin doses for patients aged 14 years and older with type 1 diabetes. The system comprises a subcutaneously worn continuous monitor that measures glucose levels every five minutes, an insulin pump strapped to the body, and an infusion patch connected to the pump with a catheter that delivers insulin. Unlike previous versions, the MiniMed responds to both low and high blood glucose levels.


Editor's Note: This news brief was brought to you by the Medical Equipment Design eNewsletter. Subscribe today to have content like this delivered to your inbox.

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Power-User
Engineering Fields - Biomedical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Omaha, Nebraska (fly-over country USA)
Posts: 383
Good Answers: 7
#1

Re: Green Light for First Artificial Pancreas

11/11/2016 2:06 PM

This device does not appear much different than what I already use.

I have been diabetic since my 30's (true type 1, not the adult onset) and have used a similar Medtronic system for several years. I also have GCM (continuous glucose monitor), an electrode in my skin to send glucose readings to my pump to alert me of a high or low. The pump is equipped with a syringe of insulin I can administer if I go high after a meal. It goes through a tube to a tiny catheter, another device in my skin. But again, it is not automatic as a pancreas. It is controlled my me - and sometimes I don't tell it right and still go high.

Also, it will only alert me of a low - so I can get something to eat. I will only refer to it close to an artificial pancreas when it automatically delivers insulin at a high and can deliver a glucose/sugar material itself to combat the low glucose. I this case it would have to provide another syringe with a sugary material and would probably need to have a separate catheter in my skin for delivery.

Fabulous idea, but many more hills to climb. But if three devices attached to me to keep the blood glucose in check - I'm all for it. However, I know US FDA would freak out if the system delivered TOO much insulin, a person could die of a low.

__________________
The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka" but rather "Hmmmmm...that's funny" - Isaac Asimov 1920-1992
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Hemet, Land of milk and honey.
Posts: 2366
Good Answers: 36
#2

Re: Green Light for First Artificial Pancreas

11/11/2016 11:57 PM

How did the clinical trials go on this product ? How did they select the process group ?

I am assuming they have already done human testing, for a while, including variations in the test group.

I saw this post this morning, but I didn't post at the time, my first impression reading the question was if could be used as a replacement for early detection of pancreatic cancer.

Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 2 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Implants Connect Using Wi-Fi   Next in Blog: Researchers Generate 3D Virtual Reality Models of Unborn Babies

Advertisement