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Inhaling Sulphur Hexafluoride.

Posted January 16, 2007 7:32 AM
User-tagged by 3 users

From Neatorama:

Remember the aluminum foil boat floating on sulphur hexafluoride gas we had before? Turns out, if you inhale the gas, it gives you the opposite effect of inhaling helium. Hit play or go to Link [YouTube] - via A Welsh View

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Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 5424
Good Answers: 293
#1

Re: Inhaling Sulphur Hexafluoride.

01/17/2007 6:56 AM

If you mixed some oxygen (20%) with this stuff then filled a large sealed room: would you be able to fly with a well designed pair of wings?

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Anonymous Poster
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Inhaling Sulphur Hexafluoride.

01/17/2007 12:14 PM

Nice try (he he). SF6 is only about 6 times denser than air and 100 times less dense than the average engineer. Better leave about 0.1% CO2 in there as well?

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Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 5424
Good Answers: 293
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Inhaling Sulphur Hexafluoride.

01/18/2007 5:49 AM

I was hoping to fly not float: 40 lb kori bustards (and some swans) are about 500 times as dense as air, and, manage to fly quite well. Why do you say I should leave some CO2 in the mix?

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Anonymous Poster
#4
In reply to #3

Re: Inhaling Sulphur Hexafluoride.

01/18/2007 6:19 AM

CO2: the idea was to maintain acidity in the blood stream. It's probably not beneficial while flying, as you will create enough CO2 yourself, but would be helpful during preparation and recovery, so you can raise the O2 level in the blood stream without causing repiratory alkalosis. The alternative is judicious use of a paper bag (but you might need some kind of CO2 measurement to supplement natural responses in this unfamiliar environment).

Even with a dense atmosphere, I fear the basic problem of muscle strength and energy provision (oxygen) versus body weight may not fully be overcome. (The problem is during take off from a flat surface). But you are right that the relationship between lift and wing size (and also viscous loss) should be improved with SF6.

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