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Join Date: Aug 2014
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Humidity and Capacitors

04/03/2015 11:55 AM

Does anyone have reliable information on the affects of humidity on C0G capacitors, opposed to film capacitors?

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Join Date: Mar 2015
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#1

Re: Humidity and capacitors.

04/03/2015 1:51 PM

The humidity doesn't has affects on any type of capacitors. see the link above (pdf.file)

table VI.

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Guru

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#5
In reply to #1

Re: Humidity and capacitors.

04/03/2015 11:10 PM

Humidity affects most capacitors to varying degrees.

It has a very large effect on air dielectric capacitors.

Tantalum caps are affected by humidity.

Paper caps are particularly vulnerable.

Most film caps are susceptible to differing degrees.

Ceramics are pretty much unaffected although BMEs can suffer.

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#2

Re: Humidity and capacitors.

04/03/2015 2:11 PM

see this link (advances in class-I C0G MLCC and SMD film capacitors) it is bdf file

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#9
In reply to #2

Re: Humidity and capacitors.

04/06/2015 3:52 PM

The link is faulty, you will have to copy past the link address again for it to work.

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Commentator

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#3

Re: Humidity and capacitors.

04/03/2015 4:14 PM

Link?

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#4

Re: Humidity and capacitors.

04/03/2015 5:54 PM

It depends on how clean the environment is around the capacitor.

Pure water/humidity is not conductive however it can cause oxidation/corrosion damage when combined with corrosive contaminants.

If conductive contamination is allowed to build on the capacitor there will be current leakage between the terminals which will affect the operation of the capacitor and may cause failure.

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#6

Re: Humidity and Capacitors

04/04/2015 5:41 PM

Humidity is the gaseous ,state of water and has little effect on electronic components. The problems arise when temperature and or pressure changes cause the gas to condense to liquid. Liquid water causes reliability problems in many electronic devices including capacitors.

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#7

Re: Humidity and Capacitors

04/06/2015 8:29 AM

A wet ceramic capacitor will fail in minutes. While they will function in a humid environment, any condensation will cause failure within minutes, reliability cannot be guaranteed. The automotive, aeronautics and military electronics industry all require some sort of coating to meet reliability in high humidity. Industry has used everything from wax to vacuum deposited man-made coatings.

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#8
In reply to #7

Re: Humidity and Capacitors

04/06/2015 3:23 PM

" Industry has used everything from wax to vacuum deposited man-made coatings."A universal problem is that the coatings that have been devised almost always display some gas permeability to water vapor. This means that water can enter the component even if it does so very slowly. When environmental conditions are proper, the vapor turns to liquid and the device fails. One thing that makes these failures so insidious is that when the temperature becomes very low (less than 0 deg C, the parts don't fail because ionic activity pretty much ceases below that temperature). Most failures are clustered between 0 and 25 degrees C. One might suspect this temperature range to be benign. but that's where most moisture related failures occur.

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