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Olympian AND Engineer - Stephen Mozia

08/03/2016 11:07 AM

Nigerian shot putter Stephen Mozia will be competing in the Olympics at Rio. In addition to being an Olympic athlete, Mozia is also an engineer who graduated from Cornell University! He currently works for Emerson Electric.

I thought it was interesting that when he was asked why he keeps throwing, he said, "I don’t get overwhelmed easy and after Cornell engineering this life is easy."

You can read more about his career and goals in this article.

What do you think about an engineer in the Olympics? Do you know of any other athletes who are also engineers or scientists?

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#1

Re: Olympian AND Engineer - Stephen Mozia

08/03/2016 2:26 PM

That is an interesting story. Strange as it may seem, most engineers are made up of many difference facets. Ryan Newman is a full time Nascar driver but also has an engineering degree. Brett Bodine was a former Nascar driver also has an engineering degree. I guess you never know where and when an engineer will show up

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#5
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Re: Olympian AND Engineer - Stephen Mozia

08/05/2016 10:32 AM

As was the late Allen Kulwiki. -- JHF

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#2

Re: Olympian AND Engineer - Stephen Mozia

08/04/2016 12:44 AM

If the starting and ending heights are the same, the best angle to launch the shot is 45º. In real life, this will change a bit because of the greater starting height, and also how the athlete's horizontal and vertical motions can contribute to speed. I am curious as to what may have been found out about these added conditions.

Go Stephen!

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#3
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Re: Olympian AND Engineer - Stephen Mozia

08/04/2016 10:05 AM

Another consideration is that the greater the launch angle is, in general the more energy the thrower will have to use to reach a given velocity (because he will have to lift the shot higher, i.e. M x G x H), so there are probably some trade-offs there to be taken into consideration.

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#4
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Re: Olympian AND Engineer - Stephen Mozia

08/04/2016 10:13 AM

I was curious and did a search.

This one talks about why the release angle might need to be shallower than 45º.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/420079/biomechanical-problem-of-shot-putting-finally-solved/

Here's a good basic explanation used in introductory physics:

http://www.bsharp.org/physics/shotput

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#6
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Re: Olympian AND Engineer - Stephen Mozia

08/06/2016 2:07 AM

Thanks! I suspected flatter would be better, but I didn't guess that much flatter.

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