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What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/21/2016 9:06 PM

I found these "Stanley" items at an estate sale in the basement of an old house. They looked interesting, so I bought them, thinking I'd be able to search old Stanley tool catalogs and find out what they are. So far, I've not found anything that even remotely resembles these things. Does anyone have any idea what they are?

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#1

Re: What are these? (I really have no clue)

12/21/2016 9:21 PM

Looks like it might be part of something....need more detail....do they fit together in any way? what movement do they have? What else was in the box with these items?

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#2

Re: What are these? (I really have no clue)

12/21/2016 10:28 PM

Maybe a door closing mechanism....

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#3

Re: What are these? (I really have no clue)

12/21/2016 11:02 PM

Does not look like any Stanley tool I've ever seen. I'd say it's a "device" of some sort. Stanley makes a whole bunch of stuff like lock sets, etc.

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#4

Re: What are these? (I really have no clue)

12/22/2016 12:48 AM

Possibly search online for vintage Stanley door hardware?

OR

Contact Stanley directly and email them pix with your question.

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#5

Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/22/2016 7:49 AM

Browsing, it appears Stanley has current product described as

Stanley Company CD1702 Fluid-Controller Door Closer

no picture found as yet - but bottom one could be a much earlier version of such Stanley hardware? Am thinking old Carnegie library had heavy doors with commercial type brass hydraulic device at top?

Google is my friend, will persue pictures of hydraulic door closers

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#6
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Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/22/2016 8:04 AM

Not Stanley, but Princeton brand. Certainly vintage and appears VERY similar to one piece you have, minus the mounting foot on the end.

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#7

Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/22/2016 3:59 PM

Well, it appears these might be components of a Stanley Hydraulic Door Check, but I can't quite think of one that these fit. I'll see if I can find any documentation.

I doubt very much these are check arms, shown with the pot-belly closer in #6.

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#8
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Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/22/2016 9:54 PM

After careful consideration of all replies, I have concluded these objects are definitely related to the Stanley tool folks as the logo in the casting has the same notched corners as the mark consists of the word "STANLEY" in a notched rectangle. This trademark is still in use to this day for many Stanley products.

Having reached this conclusion, I began searching for early U.S. patents using Google Patents. I know that the estate these items were purchased from was owned by the same family since it was built in the late 1800's, so I figured I'd take a stab at looking for Stanley patents from 1910 and back including the search term "sliding" since the brass portion of the mystery items slide on the pair of shafts.

This resulted in a number of interesting hits, one in particular, "Engine," appearing to have some similarities to the mystery objects:

I kept browsing through the pages of hits until I found the hit at the bottom of the list below:

A Miter-box with components resembling the mystery items! Seeing a strong possibility here, I looked to see what the percentage distribution of assignees is for these hits (this is a nice feature provided by Google Patents):

I clicked on the Stanley Rule & Level Co link and added the search term "miter" to narrow things down a bit more. Cutting to the chase, I continued narrowing things down until I had just 27 hits, then lo and behold, on the first search page results, a patent listed third from the bottom with patent illustrations looking nearly identical to the mystery items:

U.S. Patent No. 935,694, issued October 9, 1909:

Although there are a few pieces missing on the Stanley No. 248 Miter Box below, it provides a good look at how the mystery items, now known to be Miter Box Saw Supports, were originally used:

Mystery solved!

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#12
In reply to #8

Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/23/2016 9:29 AM

A fine bit of sleuthing there!

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#9

Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/22/2016 10:39 PM

contact me if you want the rest of the miter box...

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#10

Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/23/2016 12:13 AM

The through-slots were all but impossible to see in the OP photos. I don't remember where, but I have seen an old miter box very much like that. The widened part of the slot at the top/right accommodates the stiffening spine on a back saw.

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#11

Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/23/2016 9:25 AM

OMG, I have that Stanley miter saw box (or one very close to it) down in my work shop. I inherited it after my Grandpa passed away. I'm guessing that it may have been manufactured in the late 1940's or early 1950's?

I've even have used it a few times in the past 20 or so years to cut door and window moldings, instead of using my power miter saw. It still works great, even though I have to get the miter saw blade resharpened.

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#13
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Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/23/2016 10:06 AM

I have one in my workshop as well, but manufactured in the 80's. The only real difference is that mine still has the paint on it. I find that this tool is easier to set up and use than an power miter saw (especially since it is a lot more portable), and still use it for trim parts as I can take it to the "site" a lot quicker.

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#14

Re: What Are These? (I Really Have No Clue)

12/24/2016 10:33 AM

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