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Bilge Ejector

08/19/2008 12:03 AM

Good day to everybody!

I wonder of someone could explain to me more about the "Bilge Ejector".

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Guru
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#1

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/19/2008 12:19 AM

Hello PsychosisXore

Refer: http://books.google.com/books?id=4Y5sBNn5NwAC&pg=PA56&lpg=PA56&dq=%22Bilge+ejector%22&source=web&ots=eW1v2yaSOq&sig=XFffxFdeL8ki9AHs7o8wGAw-Wzc&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=7&ct=result

(Your above weblink will probably switch to your nearest local Google cache)

The article in the above on-line book explains it rather well.

Kind Regards....

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/19/2008 12:39 AM

Wow!!! This is very helpful... No wonder people call you Guru!

Thanks anyway... Thank you very much...

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Guru
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#3
In reply to #2

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/19/2008 2:34 AM

Hello again, PsychosisXore

You're very welcome, pleased to have you on board.

I enclose a picture of myself:

Kind Regards....

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#4
In reply to #1

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/20/2008 5:42 AM

What a neat publication. I enjoyed reading it feeling the period and atmosphere projected by the author to the intended reader. Very cool.

Thanks For it.

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#9
In reply to #1

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/21/2008 9:56 AM

Another term for it is eductor. It is essentially just a venturi tube.

We used one to empty a forward ballast tank on one of the yachts we build. It was filled and discharged with the fire pump. We used big solenoid valves to change the configuration of the eductor.

To empty the bilge water was put through the venturi which created low pressure which in turn drew water from the ballast tank.

They have the advantage of having no moving parts (if you exclude the fire pump needed to push the jet stream).

Travis

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#5

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/20/2008 11:21 AM

Steam bilge ejectors are only used in a dire emergency because they use high pressure steam through a convergent/divergent nozzle (venturi), to a discharge overboard. This action uses large amounts of steam and hence boiler feed water.

The bilge suction connects at right angles to the throat of the nozzle where there is a very low pressure. Atmospheric pressure acts on the surface of the water in the bilge, forcing it into the nozzle and then overboard with the steam that is passing through the nozzle.

The bilge system shown in the illustration above shows how a bilge ejector can work when fitted to a pumping system. If you follow the system out you can see how high pressure water can be pumped through a bilge ejector (convergent/divergent nozzle) and over the side.

This operates in the same manner as the steam ejector, however it does not remove bilge water as speedily. The advantage is that you do not have to pump dirty bilge water through the pump(s).

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/20/2008 5:29 PM

Hello MOBI

from me

Great explanatory graphic, with text to match.

Kind Regards....

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#7
In reply to #5

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/20/2008 7:58 PM

Good one Mobi.

On DDGs we had a bilge ejector for use in dire straights. We always wondered how long it would operate before the boiler feed water ran out.

We also had a portable venturi setup called a "Perry Jet".

It was great because it would move vast quantities of water at low pressure. The portable pump would take a suction from the flooded compartment, squirt it through the Perry Jet which was also in the flooded compartment. It would pick up an additional 2-3 times the volume the pump was putting through it and lift it out of the compartment.

On destroyers that was just fine as the depth below the water line was only limited and if you were sinking there would be less lift required so the pump & Perry Jet would move even more water.

This is very reassuring when you are looking at loosing your bedroom and kitchen.

BAB

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#8
In reply to #5

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/21/2008 1:50 AM

Good day to you.

Thanks for your explanation. I need the drawing of the pump, if you can do that.

Oh, one other thing! Do you think that other pump can be use for replacement? Well, I found it is hard to find the exact ejector.

Regards...

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#10
In reply to #8

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/21/2008 10:02 AM
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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/21/2008 9:58 PM

Thank you very much, guys! Y'all have been very helpful!!!

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#12

Re: Bilge Ejector

08/09/2023 3:11 AM

Yep. A telephone call to the local boat chandler would be the first step. Yellow Pages?

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Anonymous Poster (2); BlueAussieBoy (1); MOBI (1); PsychosisXore (3); PWSlack (1); Sparkstation (3); Zap (1)

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