Previous in Forum: Axial Flux Coils for Stator   Next in Forum: Can a Fish Tank Interfere with a Wireless Network?
Close
Close
Close
9 comments
Anonymous Poster

Chandelier Lighting

02/26/2010 11:12 AM

the light unit that i have has 5 lights fitted to it. it works perfectly fine with ordinary light bulbs. But when it was fitted with the energy saver type of bulb they would not light up. The old light bulbs were replaced and all of them worked.

Dose anyone have any idea why these new bulbs did not work.

Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Wichita, Kansas USA
Posts: 650
Good Answers: 30
#1

Re: chanderlier light unit

02/26/2010 11:25 AM

The only reason I can think of is that there is a dimmer or similar type circuit driving the bulbs. CFL's will not work properly on a dimmer circuit. If this unit is on a standard switch, perhaps there is dimming circuitry in the unit itself?

Tom

Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Guru
Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member Engineering Fields - Piping Design Engineering - New Member

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Richland, WA, USA
Posts: 20962
Good Answers: 780
#2

Re: chanderlier light unit

02/26/2010 11:27 AM

There may be a small difference in the screw-in base dimensions such that the new bulbs don't quite touch bottom in the sockets. However, I haven't had this problem when changing out many of my incandescents in similar fixtures.

__________________
In vino veritas; in cervisia carmen; in aqua E. coli.
Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Power-User
Engineering Fields - Systems Engineering - Member for some time now, see my profile.

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Essex, UK
Posts: 364
Good Answers: 3
#6
In reply to #2

Re: chanderlier light unit

02/27/2010 6:28 AM

In nearly all my early approaches to these 'new' lamps i found it very difficult to obtain bulbs which fitted mechanically correctly.

Some would not make contact.

Some would not fit the envelope.

And those that passed the above test were very slow to start and had poor luminosity and I still cannot readily obtain bulbs of greater than 22 Watts, ~75 Watt equivalent lumens.

Sorry to sound so pessimistic but that is the way that I have found it.

My study has been set up with 7 downlighters, all were 50Watt Halogen, I replaced a number of these with 12 V flourescents and some with 240 Volt flourescents and some were left unchanged.

After 2 years when my eyesight has suffered I am gradualy going back to 12 Volt Halogens - only one left to go! The worst one was immediately above my Desk and changing this back again was a tremendous boost to lighting levels. At least one factor was that the beamwidth of a Halogen bulb can be designed and fixed and is repeatable, so that the bulb above my desk now presents good light at Desk level.

NB I have not seen a credible improvement in Life - I have seen the same failure rate from flourescent as Halogens.

NB 2 I believe that better bulbs will eventually emerge ( maybe LEDs if properly, that is current driven) but where good light levels are needed then some hard decisions have to be made. LEds will still, I believe have to be very carefully made to avoid having to be individually adjusted for light and life.

NB 3 Where light quantity is not so important then I can find lights which will fit some of the sockets around the place.

Sleepy

Reply
Anonymous Poster
#3

Re: chanderlier light unit

02/26/2010 11:38 AM

1)) Check the voltage rating of your new bulbs and check the voltage you got in your sockets. If identical, the bulbs should light, provided that all contacts touch. 2)) On some newer bulbs, the bulb screw is a bit shorter so the contact point in the screw-end center does not always reach the contact in the socket center. 3)) This is not the forum to explain at length how the sockets are wired but you can get a nasty shock from a socket even if your lamp switch is in the "OFF" position. So leave the socket alone, do not risk your life but call an electrician to fix this for you.

Reply
Guru

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Land of Shining Waters
Posts: 782
Good Answers: 31
#8
In reply to #3

Re: chanderlier light unit

02/27/2010 9:34 AM

If proper voltage is at the sockets and new bulbs won't light, the new bulbs are probably not making contact with the socket centre. This centre contact is often a tab of spring metal that with heat and pressure from the bulb's base can lose its springiness and become flattened. Examine this centre contact to determine if this has happened. If so, turn off the power and use a small flat screwdriver to reach into the socket base and pry the tab of spring metal of the centre contact up again, enabling the centre of the base of the new bulb to reach it.

__________________
It is easier to let the cat out of the bag than to put the cat back in the bag.
Reply
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Indeterminate Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: In the bothy, 7 chains down the line from Dodman's Lane level crossing, in the nation formerly known as Great Britain. Kettle's on.
Posts: 30259
Good Answers: 816
#4

Re: Chandelier Lighting

02/26/2010 3:08 PM

Another possibility is that the energy-savers are rated for a higher voltage, and won't "strike up" at the voltage connected to the chandelier.

Another possibility is that the supply is DC and the energy-savers are in need of an AC supply to make 'em work. An incandescent will work on either.

It's a bit difficult to see these sorts of things from here....

__________________
"Did you get my e-mail?" - "The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place" - George Bernard Shaw, 1856
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Center of the Known Industrial Universe - TUGGERAH 2259 - Australia
Posts: 258
Good Answers: 51
#5

Re: Chandelier Lighting

02/26/2010 10:50 PM

Hmmm, I wonder if your 5-bulb chandelier is using 5 x 24v rated bulbs in series across a 115v supply. That could explain the reluctance of fluoro bulbs to light.

Mark Bingham
Relativity PL

Reply
Member

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Navi Mumbai India
Posts: 5
#7

Re: Chandelier Lighting

02/27/2010 7:29 AM

check is incandescent bulbs are connected in series. If yes the CFL will not work in these type of connection. You need, in that case, modify connections to parallel and these will 100% glow. try and benefit all

__________________
rc sachdeva
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 5241
Good Answers: 287
#9

Re: Chandelier Lighting

03/01/2010 3:15 AM

Are the old bulbs standard incandescents?

__________________
We are alone in the universe, or, we are not. Either way it's incredible... Adapted from R. Buckminster Fuller/Arthur C. Clarke
Reply
Reply to Forum Thread 9 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

Anonymous Poster (1); canadianslidewinder (1); PWSlack (1); Randall (1); Relativity PL (1); sachdeva_rc (1); Sleepy (1); tdesmit (1); Tornado (1)

Previous in Forum: Axial Flux Coils for Stator   Next in Forum: Can a Fish Tank Interfere with a Wireless Network?

Advertisement