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Resin Embedded Components

10/06/2011 3:47 PM

What type of resin is used to embed/encase electrical components? I want to hold a mercury bulb at an exact position insde of an alluminum enclosure. I built a prototype using polyester resin and it worked the way I wanted it to. I know there is probably another resin that is better suited for production, just dont know what I'm looking for.

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#1

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/06/2011 3:56 PM

Lots of electrical components are embedded in epoxy resin. But polyester, polyurethane, acrylics, syntactic and poured-in-place foams, have all been used. Depends on how much protection you want to pay for.

I used 'em all during my 20 years in the aerospace electronics packaging industry.

Look for "potting compounds"

Here's a small selection.

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#2

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 4:49 AM

As Lyn has said, potting compound is the way to go. However, if you are going into production, the mercury could be a problem as the use of mercury in products is banned or restricted in many regions.

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#3

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 7:26 AM

I would start with Lyn's suggestion and then contact some manufacture's and ask for a field application engineer. They are tasked with working with customers to help them select the right product for their application.

Not only do you get professional advice, it is also free!

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#6
In reply to #3

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 10:27 AM

Yep,

These guys are always looking for new consumers for their resins.

Be sure they know if you have stress sensitive (glass) components. Cure shrinkage and thermal expansion and contraction should be considered.

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#4

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 8:28 AM

Assuming you don't require any special optical properties, and that the mercury bulb is glass, I suggest you first encapsulate or coat the bulb with a softer material like silicone rubber, or a foam material. This will minimize stress concentrations that can damage a glass envelope. After that, your choice of potting material will be less restrictive. Remember that potting materials generally shrink as they cure and can apply considerable stress to components.

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#5

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 8:38 AM

If it meets your need then only thing you need to work on can I decrease product cost by selecting cheaper resin. There is laundry list of resin people have used which works and from cost side I always prefered silane for on ground use and cost effectiveiIt repels water and makes me happy

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#7

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 10:48 AM

Thanks everyone...I'm going to re-think this a little.

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#8

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 11:11 AM

Actually glass is used more often than resin. It sounds like a tilt switch.

You might want to consider a device that has an air bubble inside a water filled chamber and some photo transmitter/receiver pair. This technology is used for wireless mouse inside a handheld remote controller.

Everybody seems to be afraid of mercury, yet it is all around us. Comes down with the rain from volcanic eruptions and fossil fuel combustion all the time. It is the alternative choices that have driven all the panic.

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#9

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 4:21 PM

Yes, it is a tilt switch of sorts. It shuts down a function on a machine if the angle of operation is too great. I am working with a solid state inclinometer that I will be using on future machines. This mercury switch is just a tempory retrofit.

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: Resin Embedded Components

10/07/2011 6:18 PM

These tilt switches http://www.comus-intl.com/comustilttip.asp should be relatively insensitive to encapsulation stresses.

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Anonymous Hero (1); Chankley (1); lyn (2); Masyood (1); NotUrOrdinaryJoe (1); retrotech (2); welderman (2)

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