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Anonymous Poster #1

Linux Installation

06/28/2012 8:41 PM

I wish to dual boot winXP and CEELD in desktop. It has already XP installed. I have Live CD of CEELD and if I try to install it permanently, bit afraid of loosing all data from XP. I can't find procedure to install it anywhere in google, anyone have idea of installing the Linux?

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#1

Re: Linux installation

06/28/2012 9:33 PM

First, back up your hard drive to an external hard drive....then try this site for support...

http://forums.opensuse.org/forum.php

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Linux installation

06/29/2012 12:44 PM

Thank you

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#3

Re: Linux Installation

06/29/2012 11:09 PM

I am not as familiar with OpenSuse as I am with Debian/Ubuntu and Redhat. However, most Linux distros have a very similar process for setting up a dual boot.

1. In addition to the recommendation above to back up your hard drive, you should also empty the trash and defragment the hard drive. You may want to explore something like CCleaner as well- this helps to get rid of a lot of the garbage that tends to accumulate on a Windows box. The idea is to get your XP isntallation "optimized"- takes up less space.

2. Reboot the machine from the LiveCD. This should boot directly into the CEELD system. You may have to go in to your "BIOS" setup to get the machine to boot from the CD. Depending on your machine, there are all sorts of different ways to do this. If you have already booted the LiveCD, you are already set. Otherwise, you have to tell the machine to boot from the CD. If you don't know how to access the BIOS, watch the initial boot screen very, very carefully, paying especial attention to the bottom of the screen- it will flash (usually too quickly to read the first time) which key to hit to get in to BIOS. Also, if you are already set up to boot from alternative devices, you should see some sort of message flash by that tells you which key to press to select the boot device.

3. Once the distro is up and running, there should be an icon on the desktop, or you may have to look through the menu, called something like"Install". There may also be a "Getting Started" icon, that should give you a link to the proper instructions. If all else fails, on the desk top, you have links to on-line help and OpenSUSE. This icon should start a program that will guide you through the installation, including partitioning the hard drive and formatting the new partition, then installing the program. Generally, accepting the installer default options is the correct approach. Make sure you tell the program you are setting up a dual boot system.

4. The program will write a "boot loader" (Debian/Ubuntu uses a program called "GRUB"). After the installation is finished, you will be told to remove the CD and reboot. When you reboot, the first screen will give you an option to boot from your choice of installed operating systems.

You may also be interested in Fedora's Electronics Lab. I suspect they offer pretty much the same packages as CEELD. Fedora is the Open Source version of Redhat.

As long as you only have one Windows version, and it occupies the first bootable sector of the hard drive, you can have as many operating systems as your hard drive can hold...

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Linux Installation

06/30/2012 2:50 AM

GA for you

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#5

Re: Linux Installation

06/30/2012 5:32 AM

What nobody appears to have said to you is that if for example XP has the whole C: drive, you need to partition that drive to get some space for Linux.

Now a Linux distro may do this for you, but I find it better to do that under XP in your case, not that I have had dual boot, I simply don't trust Windows.....

Now if the C: drive is full, you may have a problem and buying a big drive first may help to solve that. Keep the old drive as a complete backup of your XP in case anything goes wrong.

Partition the new drive first.

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#6

Re: Linux Installation

06/30/2012 10:00 AM

The other "Good answers" and post are good, so I will tell you some other things to know:

1. You should re-partion within the Live CD using the GUI partioning tool in manual mode.

2. Once in there, you will shrink the partition for XP so that your Linux has about 20GB or more available as free space.

3. To setup SUSE or any other Linux distro, the simplest is to then make one partition for the whole thing, but you may want to make your own set. I would make One "swap" partition at the end of free space that is twice the size of your memory. Then make one 1GB or 2GB partition for "/boot" at the beginning and format it for ext2. Then make a 10GB partion with ext4 for "/" and the rest of free space make a ext4 partion for "/home". When done, your drive should look something like this:

::XP NTFS for xGB:ext2 2GB (boot):ext4 10GB for /:ext4 BIG for /home:swap 2GB::

If you intend to run multiple VMs then save a big chunk of free space and partition it for /tmp using ext4 and make it 10GB or more depending on the number and size of your VMs. Even if you store your VMs in your /home/userspace, the OS will need the /tmp space to switch between running VMs, or for major backup/compression operations on them.

By creating a separate /boot, you make it a little easier to find and alter the boot loader configuration files, and by separating /home you make it easier to connect your home directory to another *nix OS if you decide to add a another one.

That's my 2 cents. Good luck

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