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AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/14/2007 7:26 AM

what is the speed of an AIRBUS aeroplane during take off.

And what is the speed of a general (120-sitter) aeroplane during take off.

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#1

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/14/2007 10:11 AM

And you need this information for...?

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/14/2007 11:46 PM

Not a question that would have been asked not too long ago, but not inappropriate in modern times.

Anywhere between 50 and 300 knots depending on exact circumstances, taking off with a tailwind, etc.

Would you be new to aviation?

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#3

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/15/2007 1:00 AM

Most aircraft take-off at a speed of between 80 - 150 knots depending on the size the aircraft, environmental factors etc.

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Guru
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#4

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/15/2007 8:42 AM

Would your question be referring to the A380 as against earlier versions of aircraft that the company has built?

If yes, remember it is not the size of an aircraft that dictates the takeoff speed under any given set of conditions, it is basically a function (mainly) of the size of the wing and its loading. e.g. a bigger wing has a lower loading (for the same weight of aircraft!) and therefore flies at a lower speed!

This is a bit simply put, but I hope it achieves it's aim for you!

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#5

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/15/2007 9:48 AM

GRoss weight?, Flap setting?, Altitude of airport runway?, local weather conditions (headwind/tailwind), Airspeed vs groundspeed? One other factor is the control power of the ailerons and rudder/elevator. A certain airspeed is required to have sufficient control of the aircraft to have control power to turn, toll, etc.

Your question is too open ended. Per the earlier responses, the airspeed of the jet will be 100~150 kias. Higher altitude runways require higher airspeed due to reduced air density.

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/15/2007 10:58 AM

I am guessing, but I felt that he just wanted a simple answer. What bothered me more was he did not seem to know exactly which aircraft he needed the infos for......or at least he did not tell us!

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Associate

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#7

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/15/2007 11:22 AM

Unfortunately, you're going to get many replies that ask for more information which won't help you a bit.

Here's a data point: an A-330-343 (250 passengers) with a takeoff weight of 220 metric tons at 20-deg C should rotate (lift the nose wheel) at 157 knots. This is referred to as V1. The takeoff safety speed (V2) is 162 knots. I know the A-330 is bigger than the 120-seat plane to which you referred, but the speed is indicative of most airliners. Smaller planes have less wing area, but the wing loading is about the same and the takeoff speeds are in the same ballpark. There is no absolute answer to your question, since it depends on many variables and it is calculated by the flight crew for each takeoff. However, 160 knots for a fully-loaded airliner is close enough for general discussion purposes.

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#8
In reply to #7

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/15/2007 11:43 AM

Perfectly put!

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#9

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/16/2007 12:01 AM

In addition to the valuable information in other replies, consider the effect of runway altitude on landing and take-off speeds. Cusco in Peru and, in particular, La Paz airport in Bolivia are among the highest altitude runways in the world (La Paz is the highest commercial runway). Take-off and landing speeds there are higher than at sea level, because of the reduced air density at these altitudes. At these airports, only certain types of plane can get in and out, as the runway speeds and lengths determine those that will and those that won't be able to do so.

Try talking to a commercial pilot with a view to picking his/her brains and experience on this subject?

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: AIRBUS Airplane Take-off Speed?

05/16/2007 10:44 AM

The airspeed indicator reads "Indicated Airspeed" (IAS), not True Airspeed (TAS). The Airspeed Indicator's data source is the pitot static tube, which detects the total and static pressures (both functions of density and hence, altitude). So, at a given weight and outside air temperature, using IAS takes into account the difference in air density (altitudes). If the calculation says rotate at 160 knots IAS, then it's 160 knots at sea level as well as at La Paz. Of course, the True Airspeed (TAS) will be greater at the higher elevations because of the reduced air density.

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