Previous in Forum: COP Excel Spreadsheet for Calculations   Next in Forum: Coco Diesel vs Petro-Diesel?
Close
Close
Close
5 comments
Associate

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 30

The Internet Killed Distance. Mobile Computing Brought It Back.

11/07/2013 11:21 AM

An intriguing viewpoint from MIT on how smartphones are changing the dynamic of how we purchase - switching from Internet based, Amazon-like purchases to local buying; due in part to the 'disutility' (in some cases) of buying without sampling the product first physically.

Tries to address why we need stores at all when we can purchase anything from the Internet. Some research showing that as local book stores pop up, online purchases for books in the region drop. Implies that both brick and mortar and online systems will be required to guide increased sales. So does this mean that Amazon will soon start opening stores (as we watch Blockbuster close the remainder of theirs)?

http://unbonmotgroundswell.blogspot.com/2013/11/the-internet-killed-distance-mobile.html

Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42307
Good Answers: 1666
#1

Re: The Internet Killed Distance. Mobile Computing Brought It Back.

11/07/2013 6:53 PM

This is all "dislogical", and just proves how "disconnected" the consumer really is.

Moore's law seems to have spread to consumerism, as well.

Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 30
#2
In reply to #1

Re: The Internet Killed Distance. Mobile Computing Brought It Back.

11/07/2013 7:03 PM

I would say in general that's true about consumers - but a lot of thought goes into trying to figure out how to sell to them. The ad model for Google is based on search engines being the most efficient way to connect consumers with goods and services. Similar models by Facebook and Twitter are fueling their valuations as well.

Not sure what your implication is regarding consumerism and Moore's Law. Consumers are doubling in complexity every 18 months?

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42307
Good Answers: 1666
#3
In reply to #2

Re: The Internet Killed Distance. Mobile Computing Brought It Back.

11/07/2013 7:20 PM

More like consumers are doubling in fickleness.

And the actual quality of the product offered has become less improtant than devising a means to induce the consumer to part with their money for it.

Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 30
#4
In reply to #3

Re: The Internet Killed Distance. Mobile Computing Brought It Back.

11/07/2013 7:34 PM

The fickleness probably has something to do with the "actual quality of the product" factor. I deal with technical sales of enterprise systems throughout the world. The attitude in several places is such that they will purchase equipment designed in Asia over equipment of quality made in the USA because it is cheaper; even when you point out to them that although it's 1/2 the price, it lasts less than 6 months in the field, whereas ours will last 3 to 5 years - it doesn't seem to matter. The only thing that matters is how much they have to pay now. In the US markets low cost is a factor, but consumers generally have no problem paying a little more for something they deem to be of quality.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42307
Good Answers: 1666
#5
In reply to #4

Re: The Internet Killed Distance. Mobile Computing Brought It Back.

11/07/2013 8:01 PM

The Walmart syndrome. Practiced by many, is what you describe.

That's the exact opposite of the Duck Dynasty syndrome. Daffy hunters will pay $150.00 USD for a $10.00 duck call, because it's trick and supposedly made by rednecks. Or $1,200.00 for a jacket (with hidden gun pockets) with a Smith and Wesson label. Is it better? Probably not. Is it cooler, hell yes!

I'm of the Harbor Freight ilk for tools I buy for home use, because I use them gently and infrequently. But when I buy tools for work, where I neither use nor pay for them, I'm more the Sharper Image shopper. I pay for quality. (or perceived quality)

All references to actual businesses are for descriptive purposes and do not reflect any actual evaluations of the relative quality of the products offered by the companies referred to by the author.

Register to Reply
Register to Reply 5 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Forum: COP Excel Spreadsheet for Calculations   Next in Forum: Coco Diesel vs Petro-Diesel?

Advertisement