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Join Date: Aug 2014
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Electrical Safety

08/10/2014 9:18 AM

Dear Sir,

May you provide me with the safety procedures should be taken for electricity works in a commercial kitchen and specially over and in the cooking area to avoid any hazard of shocks or fire.

- How to install the cables / wires?

-where to install the cables /wires?

- What kind of cables or wires should be installed in the cooking area?

-What kind of pipes should be used ?

- Where the plugs should be installed?

-what about the hood lamps?

- what about shut-off switch?

thank you in advance for your help.

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#1

Re: ELECTRICITY SAFETY

08/10/2014 9:31 AM

Arming you with electrical installation instructions would be like handing you 5 gallons of gas and a lighted match. No good would even come of it and the building would likely burn to the ground.

- How to install the cables / wires? Hire a qualified electrician.

-where to install the cables /wires? Hire a qualified electrician.

- What kind of cables or wires should be installed in the cooking area? Hire a qualified electrician.

-What kind of pipes should be used ? Hire a qualified electrician.

- Where the plugs should be installed? Hire a qualified electrician.

-what about the hood lamps? Hire a qualified electrician.

- what about shut-off switch? Hire a qualified electrician.

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#2

Re: ELECTRICITY SAFETY

08/10/2014 11:31 AM

I've got good news for you. Your local qualified electrician has a code book to work to. Get him or her to do the installation.

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: ELECTRICITY SAFETY

08/10/2014 1:08 PM

Dear Crabtree,

Thank you for your reply.

99% of the electricians knows nothing about the safety procedures this the problem I face with them ,so every week you hear about a kitchen fire .as I know there are about 40 pts of safety procedures should be taken in the kitchen.

Kindly noted I read the code book of electricity safety guide , is good but doesn't notice about the strategy of electricity in the kitchen to avoid a disaster.

regards

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: ELECTRICITY SAFETY

08/10/2014 3:01 PM

American or UK code will be more than adequate to follow, get proper fire suppression and ventilation

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#9
In reply to #4

Re: ELECTRICITY SAFETY

08/11/2014 9:13 AM

If you want the 'safest' (aka, most strict, most redundant protections, and also, most expensive) codes to follow, purchase a copy of the Chicago Electrical Codes. You follow those, and no inspector can cite you for an unsafe practice, unless they're focusing solely on the 'green ground wire' issue. Chicago codes don't need the green ground wire since all boxes must be metal and all conduit must be metal. In the Chicago codes, you CAN run a green ground wire (or green/yellow if you prefer international colors) but it's not required.

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#8
In reply to #3

Re: ELECTRICITY SAFETY

08/11/2014 8:58 AM

I is understandable in your concern about safety. But to vent it at the electricians skills is wrong. Some one has to define the level of safety needed in the environment. With that they would know how to go about providing the level necessary. They are not the ones that have been trained to evaluate the level necessary.

Now the code book will not spell out the necessary work needed to be done for a kitchen. What it may do is define a kitchen environment in one of several categories. That environment maybe considered explosive because of the amount of evaporated oils in the air but I'm not sure. If in your concern for safety you call the shots have them wire it as if it was an explosive environment.

I do doubt though that all those kitchen fires were caused by electrical wiring. More likely employee negligence. Or the managements failure to repair something when it should have been. Maybe it would be good safety lesson for your employee's and yourself if you ask for the fire report on all those kitchen fires and go over them.

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#5

Re: Electrical Safety

08/10/2014 3:14 PM
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#6

Re: Electrical Safety

08/10/2014 10:49 PM

Rule 1: Hire a QUALIFIED electrician

Rule 2: If in doubt see Rule 1

No arguments no compromise, if your local electrician is not properly qualified then hire one from somewhere who is or you will achieve fame but no fortune as a Darwin Award recipient.

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#7

Re: Electrical Safety

08/11/2014 4:59 AM

If unpopularity with the building's fire insurance company is a thing to be avoided, hire a qualified Electrician and obtain test certification documents to confirm that the installation is correct before paying the final invoice; these documents may be needed by the local Planning office before a building works completion certificate is issued and without it the freehold of the building could not be sold. In the UK, this individual will follow BS7671 to produce a compliant installation.

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#10

Re: Electrical Safety

08/11/2014 9:29 AM

One problem with providing a concrete answer is that we do not know where Mr/Mz Kazzi is. The resources available in Albany, NY, for example, are quite different from *click*click*umba*click* in the middle of the African Savanna(1).

It could be that where Kazzi is, there are no enforced building or electrical codes, no consistent licensing and training of electricians, and no competent government officials to set up the official standards.

From Kazi's command of the English language, I'm reasonably sure that he is outside the North American or European continents, so he may be coming to us for help that his own country's leaders are unwilling/unable to supply. I for one am willing to give the benefit of the doubt and wait until we find out a little more about the conditions that let him to ask a forum of almost-anonymous Engineers for help.

Notes:

1) I specifically chose a no-running-water, no-electricity, no-internet village that has yet to see a white man so I wouldn't accidentally offend anyone. With no internet, they'll never know I picked on them here.

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#14
In reply to #10

Re: Electrical Safety

08/13/2014 2:48 PM

Dear Mr.Adreasler,

Thank you for your reply, you are smart , first I m a boy , from Beirut , Lebanon , you are right .

The problem that I cannot find a qualified electrician to provide me all the safety procedures for the electricity works should be taken over and around the cooking area of a commercial kitchen.

every week We face ,like other countries , fires in the restaurants because of unsafe electricity,so I m trying to learn from professional expert like you and other friends'advice.

regrads

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#15
In reply to #14

Re: Electrical Safety

08/14/2014 10:32 AM

In that case, and with it being in a commercial kitchen environment, I would lean more to the Chicago Electrical codes.

I'm not a Licensed and Bonded Electrician, so this is outside my authority to advise in detail, but if you head over to www.ibew.org you should be able to find plenty of friendly and knowledgeable people who can provide you with the details you need.

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#11

Re: Electrical Safety

08/11/2014 10:08 AM

Having done commercial kitchen work, including all of the electric work in new and remodeled kitchens, for over 50 years, I don't think the electrical work is any more critical in a kitchen than anywhere else. The quality of the work, connections tight, properly designed and installed ground system, and correct sizing of conductors and overcurrent devices are the same as in other places.

What I would be concerned with is the vent hood system design and installation. The National Fire Prevention Association produces a standard, number 96, that is used in the USA. It's specifications require adequate air flow to remove the cooking vapors and reduce grease building and maintain sanitary conditions.

Also, many codes require disconnecting means for the electric and gas to the appliances in the event of fire and they require a fire suppression system. These reduce the chance of fire and the damage if one occurs, but are not part of the electrical design or installation. -- JHF

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#12

Re: Electrical Safety

08/11/2014 7:09 PM

Friend,

The advice to find a qualified electrician is good. If you are wanting to do this work yourself and you don't already have at least 3-years of full-time SUPERVISED experience in the electrical trade, don't do it. The various electrical code books are NOT design guides nor are they texts that tell how to do the work--they are standards against which the finished work is measured. The experience and training received during those 3+ years of prior work are necessary to understand the hazards and ways to avoid them. The codes have been developed, based on over 100 years' experience with what works and what doesn't.

Things to consider:

  1. Heat is your enemy. When carrying a load, wires produce heat and they are also exposed to heat in their environment. These add-up. The insulation on the wire can only be exposed to a certain amount of heat before it will be damaged and eventually cause a fire.
  2. Every wire has a safe amount of electricity it can carry, called amps.
  3. Every wire's insulation has a safe level of electricity it can protect, called volts.
  4. Every circuit has a specific type or arrangement of wires to carry the electricity--such as single-phase, three-phase wye, and a number of others.
  5. Every appliance used in a kitchen should have a label that tells you the amps, volts, and circuit type needed for that appliance. For motors, the label data leaves vital information that you will need to get from code tables.
  6. Every circuit will run through areas that may expose its wires to elevated temperatures.
  7. Every circuit must be protected against short circuits, overloads, and very often) ground faults.
  8. The code books give tables that help to match wire size, insulation type, and protection devices against the needs of the appliance(s).
  9. Put these things together and you can start.
  10. But, you still need the experience and training to get the right stuff installed in a way that will keep it working safely. This includes any raceways or conduit needed, how to install them, protection from physical damage, labeling, testing, and many other items.

I suggest you ask the people who claim to know how to wire a commercial kitchen--have them give you references of completed work, proof of experience and training, licensing (if it is done where you live), and a written warranty against any faults or problems for at least 1 full year (this may mean some form of liability insurance and completed works insurance). If the person cannot supply these items, then I would agree with your opinion that they are part of the "95%" of people who don't know what they are doing.

--John M.

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#16
In reply to #12

Re: Electrical Safety

08/16/2014 3:46 AM

Dear John,

Thank you for your valuable remarks to avoid any fire hazard in the kitchen.

regards

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#17
In reply to #16

Re: Electrical Safety

08/16/2014 8:40 PM

Friend,

In the USA electrical problems cause only a small portion of kitchen fires. Much more common is hot grease, gas leaks, and other things. Electricity can and does participate in many problems, but the design and installation of the wiring provides a fairly high level of safety to the equipment and personnel. Have you talked with people in your country, people who study and know the actual cause for the fires you speak about?

--John M.

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#13

Re: Electrical Safety

08/13/2014 11:33 AM
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#18

Re: Electrical Safety

08/28/2014 3:21 AM

I have found a cook book for you while googling for safety and precautions
Electricity at work-Safe working practices "HSG85 (Third edition)Published 2013"
Go through it.
We hope it will help you in your kitchen.

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Users who posted comments:

adreasler (3); Circuit Breaker (1); Crabtree (1); elie kazzi (3); Fredski (1); gckent (1); jmueller (2); lyn (2); ozzb (1); PWSlack (1); The.Tinkerer (1); write2echelon (1)

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