Mechanical Power Transmission

The Mechanical Power Transmission Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about Gears & Gearbox Assemblies; Belts, Pulleys, Chains & Sprockets; Brakes, Clutches & Couplings; Design & Analysis. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

ACME Lead Screw Systems Lead to Low Friction, High Efficiency

Posted May 20, 2018 12:01 AM by erathburn
Pathfinder Tags: acme lead screw igus screw drive

Lead screws are a common technology used to convert rotary motion into linear motion, and are often used to provide actuation to a set of linear bearings. Lead screws and plastic nuts are excellent lower-cost alternatives to ball screws and metallic nuts when used in applications where extreme precision (micron level) is not required. One of the most common lead screw geometries in North American manufacturing is the ACME lead screw system.

ACME lead screws were developed in America in the mid-1800s and have been routinely utilized since. Designed with a trapezoidal shape, a flank angle of 29 degrees and a higher pitch than fastening screws, they were made for applications requiring frequent positioning, including power transmission applications moving high axial loads.

High-performance plastic ACME nuts are ideal to use in an ACME system. igus® triboplastic iglide® ACME nuts from the drylin® product line are made of composite plastic materials, which offer lower friction and wear values than many other materials across a wide range of applications. The triboplastics operate free from oil and grease, and they do not require maintenance. They are also able to operate on traditional ferrous lead screws, as well as light-weight aluminum lead screws. Furthermore, they can handle high axial loads, they are insensitive to dirt and dust, they are corrosion-resistant, they have lower wear than other plastics, and they handle vibrations and impact loading better than bronze nuts do.

Speeds and Loads

Due to the tight pitch geometry of ACME systems, they are best suited for low-speed positioning applications. For designs requiring a high linear feed rate, we recommend higher helix lead screws such as dryspin® technology.

The maximum RPM typically recommended for an ACME lead screw is dependent on the radial and axial support from the radial bearings or bushings. For applications exceeding 100 RPM, it is highly recommended that the lead screw be supported by ball bearings. Many radial ball bearings are also capable of carrying the axial load generated by many applications. For those applications under 100 RPM, plastic bushings like iglide® bearings may be used, which do not require lubrication and are ideal for many industries.

For more information, visit www.igus.com/leadscrews.

Figure 1: In the igus® ACME screw system, there are (1) screw support blocks, (2) lead screw supports with ball bearing, and (3) lead screw supports with plain bearing. (Source: igus)

To learn more about the ACME lead screw system from igus®, visit www.igus.com/leadscrews.

This is a sponsored blog post by igus® inc.

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A Self-contained Marine Hydraulic Clutch System with Integrated PTO

Posted March 18, 2016 12:00 AM by SavvyExacta
Pathfinder Tags: clutch hydraulic clutch marine

A self-contained hydraulic clutch system (SCS) can be a beneficial option for marine propulsion applications.

For example, an SCS can offer:

  • Improved performance
  • Compact design
  • Ease of installation

Because of its ability to "slip," the output speed can be reduced to provide precise control of the propulsion equipment. The flexibility as a standalone clutch plus the integral PTO makes it great for both new construction as well as retrofits/repowers. The SCS is ideal for conventional drives, z-drives, or hybrid drives.

Does your work take you underwater? If you're curious about the SCS then you should check out Ortlinghaus's webinar on the topic.

Key take-aways:

  • Discover how a self-contained clutch unit can offer improved performance yet compact design providing ease of installation.
  • Understand how operating a drive in "trolling" mode can provide precise propeller control but still enable the diesel to run at idle speed
  • Learn how this fully integrated clutch system with an integral hydraulic supply, heat exchanger, PTO, sensors, and all hydraulic components to operate the unit and easily connect with the ship controls, makes the SCS an easy "drop-in" replacement for retrofits, upgrades, or complete re-power projects

Webinar Details:

Available on-demand until June 10, 2016.

View the webinar today!

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Hybrid (Flying) Car?

Posted December 28, 2011 12:38 PM

You might think hybrid powertrains are cropping up all over. And they are. Now comes word of development of a hybrid flying car! Have we heard this song before?

The preceding article is a "sneak peek" from Mechanical Power Transmission, a newsletter from GlobalSpec. To stay up-to-date and informed on industry trends, products, and technologies, subscribe to Mechanical Power Transmission today.

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Innovation Revelation

Posted November 30, 2011 8:18 AM

Some studies suggest that while R&D spending is adequate, many companies are spending funds on "safe" projects and protective patents, rather than looking for technology breakthroughs. Is that the case from your experience?

The preceding article is a "sneak peek" from Mechanical Power Transmission, a newsletter from GlobalSpec. To stay up-to-date and informed on industry trends, products, and technologies, subscribe to Mechanical Power Transmission today.

3 comments; last comment on 12/01/2011
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Back to Basics with Hybrids?

Posted October 26, 2011 7:28 AM

An increasing number of aircraft and automobiles are being powered by them. While hybrid powertrains are seeing wider applications, is it time to step back and say that their complexity may not be worth the extra cost, especially in light of improvements in internal combustion engine efficiency?

The preceding article is a "sneak peek" from Mechanical Power Transmission, a newsletter from GlobalSpec. To stay up-to-date and informed on industry trends, products, and technologies, subscribe to Mechanical Power Transmission today.

4 comments; last comment on 11/03/2011
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