Appliance Technology Blog

Appliance Technology

The Appliance Technology Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about Consumer Electronics; Medical Products; Home & Office Equipment; and Power Tools, Lawn and Garden. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Previous in Blog: How to Choose a Tablet PC in 2014 (Part 2 – Size and Operating System)   Next in Blog: The Resurgence of Virtual Reality
Close
Close
Close

How to Choose a Tablet PC in 2014 (Part 4 – Screen Resolution and Cameras)

Posted February 14, 2014 12:00 AM by SavvyExacta

This post will cover some general specifications of tablet computers. If you're new to the series, you might want to go back and read Part 1 (types and basic information), Part 2 (size and operating system), and Part 3 (storage and battery life). When you're ready, come back to this page to learn about other specs like screen resolution and cameras.

Most tablets have capacitive touchscreens that respond to skin touch rather than pressure. (Resistive touchscreens, used as POS signature pads in retail stores, require pressure of a stylus or finger to generate a response.) Tablet screens are used for both navigation and viewing on the devices.

Screen Resolution

Display resolution is the number of pixels in each direction. A display being held horizontally with 1024 x 768 resolution has 1024 pixels from right to left and 768 from top to bottom. Most tablets offer a resolution ranging from 1024 x 600 to 2560 x 1600.

Pixel density is another specification you may want to consider. It's the number of pixels per inch (PPI) and ranges from 130 PPI to 400 PPI in most tablets. Apple introduced its Retina display which boasts 264 PPI. It's unlikely that the human eye would detect an improvement in quality at higher pixel densities unless using a microscope.

Considering that widescreen HD movies are 1920 x 1080, it's unlikely that the average user would need a higher screen resolution.

Cameras

Cameras and screen resolution go hand-in-hand, at least to some extent, because what you're photographing will be displayed on the same device's screen for viewing.

Many tablets have cameras on both the front and back of the device. The "front" is the side that faces the user. It typically has a lower resolution than the "back" camera, also known as the rear-facing camera, that is located at the back of the device. A forward-facing camera is used for video conferencing applications like Skype or for taking "selfies." It's useful because the user can view him or herself on the screen while taking the image. A rear-facing camera can be used for the same purpose, or to take photos or videos of things in the user's line of site.

Cameras vary in terms of megapixels (most range from 1 MP - 5 MP), autofocus, flash, and incorporated microphones.

That's it for today. For now, tell us: how important are screen resolution and a camera to you?


The next part of this series will cover more system specifications including wireless connectivity and ports for input and output. It'll be available next week, right here on CR4.

Read more about selecting tablet computers, including a 2014 comparison guide, on IHS GlobalSpec.

Image Credits: Harwarezone

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru
Engineering Fields - Optical Engineering - Member Engineering Fields - Engineering Physics - Member Engineering Fields - Systems Engineering - Member

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Trantor
Posts: 5363
Good Answers: 646
#1

Re: How to Choose a Tablet PC in 2014 (Part 4 – Screen Resolution and Cameras)

02/14/2014 8:19 AM

Apple introduced its Retina display which boasts 264 PPI. It's unlikely that the human eye would detect an improvement in quality at higher pixel densities unless using a microscope.

Actually, the eye can detect improvement in certain cases. A tiny jog in a straight line can be detected even when the jog is well below what is considered the limit of the eye's resolving power, usually given as 1 arc second. This is actually how the term 'retinal' came about, in trying to make a display that acknowledges this ability of the eye and makes use of it.

Of course the real purpose of a retinal display is not to show tiny jogs in lines, but to allow smooth 'pinch and zoom' when photographs or text are displayed on a screen. Prior to retinal displays, the 'pinch and zoom' operation was very uneven, as the image jumped from one proportionate array of pixels to the next. The finer resolution of a retinal display allows this growth and shrinkage to look smooth and natural. New features have been added making use of this fine resolution, allowing images and text to be smoothly rotated, for example, as though the screen is a continuous surface rather than an array of fixed pixels.

__________________
Whiskey, women -- and astrophysics. Because sometimes a problem can't be solved with just whiskey and women.
Reply
Reply to Blog Entry
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: How to Choose a Tablet PC in 2014 (Part 2 – Size and Operating System)   Next in Blog: The Resurgence of Virtual Reality

Advertisement