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ESOS Presents Opportunities to Invest and Improve: Deadline Approaches

Posted October 26, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

All UK manufacturing and processing plants must undergo an energy-assessment and energy-saving audit by December 5, 2015, under the government's Energy Savings Opportunities Scheme (ESOS), or risk receiving a heavy fine. While the ESOS appears burdensome, in reality it creates opportunities for companies to boost profitability and competitiveness, and invest in their future. So goes this Industry Today article which suggests that pump technology may be the area where the biggest rewards can be reaped. Newer sinusoidal pumps, for example, can be run from smaller, more efficient motors, and slash energy consumption by up to half.


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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: North West England
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Re: ESOS Presents Opportunities to Invest and Improve: Deadline Approaches

10/27/2015 6:20 AM

"All UK manufacturing and process plants" needs to be qualified to UK manufacturing and process plants with over 250 employees or a €50million turnover, but excluding organizations owned by the public/government. The audits must be carried out by an approved auditor and when I checked the UK government web site today it listed only 15 organizations who are themselves approved to accredit and hold a register of their own members to do this work. So there is a shortage of approved auditors leading to rip off prices being charged. Why the Institution of Chemical Engineers and some private companies should be allowed to approve their own members is a mystery. Add the requirement for the audits to be repeated every 4 years and this shortage problem is not going to go away.

A agree that governments should encourage energy saving measures, and some form of compulsion may be needed, but this legislation has been very badly implemented. It does nothing to improve energy efficiency and may hinder it by diverting money and manpower into box ticking and report writing to satisfy the legislation.

It assumes that large industry players are not already trying to make energy savings to improve their bottom line and imposes an expensive and time consuming burden, especially on those who have already completed there own "non-approved" energy audit and are obliged to duplicate work already done.

It exempts the service and retail sectors who are allowed to be as inefficient in energy usage as they like without sanction.

It exempts the government from putting it's own house in order.

It exempts small and medium sized companies who may not have the in house knowledge to improve their energy efficiency. Small and medium companies are the largest component of UK industry.

How is the UK government's stated policy of re-balancing our economy helped by imposing further red tape exclusively on the small sector that they are supposed to be encouraging?

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