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Think Big with Robot-mounted 3D Printer

Posted April 16, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Typically, 3D printers operate within a workspace defined by the build plate and print-head guide rails. Printed objects generally measure a few inches, but a really big printer may produce parts several feet in size. How to build bigger? One solution combines additive manufacturing with mobile robots. Engineering360 explains how "Addibots" not only expand the traditional workspace of 3D printers, they expand the possibilities of additive manufacturing itself. Two videos offer application examples.


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Re: Think Big with Robot-mounted 3D Printer

04/17/2016 7:21 AM

Leggo building and design methodology can also be adapted...

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