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Participant

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2

Question on using Titanium mesh in a glass kiln

03/14/2009 4:41 PM

Hi, I am a glass artist working with hot glass in a kiln and I'm looking for a mesh to melt glass over and through to create unique color patterns. Most artist use some form of stainless steel mesh which spall but even though that really isn't a major problem it's one I'm looking to get around. While looking up places to purchase the stainless steel mesh I came across a site that also sells titanium mesh. My thoughts were maybe this is a harder material, maybe no spalling, maybe it would last longer. Most mesh melts are fired between 1500 to 1700 to achieve the melting point. We can't use anything galvanized due to toxic fumes either. So I'm wondering if anyone here knows anything about how titanium mesh would react under these circumstances? I don't want to test it in my kiln and risk messing it up of getting knocked out by fumes! Thanks for listening, hope someone here knows something about this! Jeri

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Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: El Lago, Texas, USA
Posts: 2640
Good Answers: 65
#1

Re: Question on using Titanium mesh in a glass kiln

03/14/2009 7:47 PM

As a glass artist myself, I would encourage you to do the test. The melting point of titanium is 400 degrees higher than steel - which is why it is used in spacecraft and very high speed aircraft. Also, titanium is often used in surgical implants (my dad's new knee for example) so toxicity shouldn't be an issue - assuming you follow the standard precautions. I would recommend that the screen be super clean, and that you handle it as little as possible to avoid skin oils, etc.

If memory serves, titanium is also used in the creation of dichroic glass. I can't speak to the spalling issue, but an artist should never be afraid to experiment.

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Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1601
Good Answers: 57
#2

Re: Question on using Titanium mesh in a glass kiln

03/15/2009 8:48 AM

Treat titanium with respect. At elevated temperature, titanium reacts violently with oxygen in the atmosphere. Worse yet, it is the only element that burns in nitrogen (80% of the atmosphere). In small samples, I wouldn't expect a life threatening reaction, but proceed with caution. I would suggest trying platinum or one of its alloys.

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Participant

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2
#3

Re: Question on using Titanium mesh in a glass kiln

03/15/2009 9:38 AM

Thank you all for the information. I think I will stay with the tried and true stainless steel! Jeri

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Guru

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Germany 49° 26' N, 7° 46' O
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#4

Re: Question on using Titanium mesh in a glass kiln

03/15/2009 1:27 PM

Hi,

this seems good but in reality will bring big problems.

Titanium is useful only because the surface is oxidised, and either it will burst to fire as stated above (and only extinguished by sand or similar material), or it will heavily oxidise and the oxide will dissolve in the glass as any oxide to change the glass properties - you would not want this.

If you want to do some experiments then try nickel. I worked (a long time ago) for some weeks in a quartz glass factory and they used nickel bars to reshape (by pressing from the inside) the collapsing furnace, a muffle wherein the quartz-glass was melted (very high viscosity, not really a fluid at 1900°C).

So I expect that nickel may be good for a test.

If you can get an alloy NiAl or NiCr this will be better as not so easily oxidised.

A simple sample you can get as chromel and alumel for thermo-element use.

RHABE

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