Previous in Forum: RCBO'S   Next in Forum: Magnetic Field Repulsion
Close
Close
Close
36 comments
Guru
United States - Member - USA! Hobbies - Musician - Sound Man Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - More than a Hobby Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: City of Roses.
Posts: 2056
Good Answers: 99

DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/13/2011 7:46 PM

I have a window of opportunity to take on a project of building a custom ultrasonic parts cleaner for large metal parts (Hydraulic manifolds, and similar parts). I have looked around for ready built ones, but it seems that the technology is simple enough that I should be able to make one which is more specifically suited to my needs. I'll need to have a tank approx. 2ft X 2ft X 1ft or thereabout. My dilemma is the ultrasonic transducer, or similar device to "excite" the water. I have found many transducers primarily used for small parts washers that appear to simply be a piezoelectric device, but are unable to provide enough power to agitate a tank of my size.

The units in my size range start at about $4,000, and seem to run at 1000W or greater, where the transducers I have been finding are in the 20-100W range.

Would I be able to use multiple 50W transducers running in phase on the same frequency to excite the water enough to clean the parts? My thought is that due to geometry, they would end up cancelling each other out, and thus proving ineffective.

This is by far NOT my field of expertise, but I know enough about electricity to be dangerous, and fluid mechanics is right up my alley. I think this is a project I could theoretically accomplish, but apparently don't know how to provide enough power ultrasonically to the fluid of appropriate volume.

Anyone have any thoughts to share?

I'll be trolling the web for answers while I check back to my favorite place on the web... CR4. If anyone has an answer, it's gotta be one of you guys.

Thank you in advance.

Cheers!

-R

__________________
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet!
Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Power-User

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 108
Good Answers: 2
#1

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/13/2011 8:43 PM

Hey there, RVZ717,

My practical experience is pretty limited, so take the following with a gigantic grain of salt. I'm just the first responder, I'm pretty sure you'll get some expert advice shortly.

I assume you would be using a stainless steel tank, which is fine and not subject to breakage if someone carelessly drops a heavy part into the tank. I don't have enough expertise to be able to recommend any particular transducer or design layout, but here are some things to bear in mind:

1-Use appropriate safety measures! Ultrasonic generators use and deliver hefty amounts of energy, so be extremely careful! Do a LOT of research on RF safety, it's tricky stuff and can get nasty.

2-Running multiple transducers is fairly common, especially with the larger tank sizes. The manufacturer should be able to provide some basic layouts. In fact, they may even carry a line of ultrasonic generators specifically made for the transducer you select.

3-The ultrasonic generator needs to be matched to what is essentially a tuned circuit. Some generators have auto-tune capability, some don't. It's probably a function of price.

4-The frequency you chose will need to be selected to give the best results with whatever material you intend to be removing.

5-It is possible, but not too likely, that you could use too much power and actually induce tiny amounts of pitting in some of the finer mating surfaces. I'm thinking this might apply to aluminum parts in particular. Again, I'm shooting in the dark here, so check with the rest of the CR4'ers on this.

6-When you design the circuit, be sure to include a level sensor and automatic cutoff for the liquid. Some US generators have a readily accessed interlock connection as part of their circuit; if you select one that does, it'd be good to use it. Having this may prevent the xducers from being run while the tank is empty or too low on water. It shouldn't happen, but with humans being involved, who knows?

7-When you build the tank, be sure and design it so that transducers can be changed out safely and with relative ease. I've had to change some out on a double-walled tank and don't want to think about it or I'll start having flashbacks.

8-I'm pretty sure you'll think of this, but when you clean parts, the sludge has to go somewhere, so be sure to build in a drain and plumbing.

9-If you really want to get technical, it is possible to use an US meter to get a measurement of the power at specific locations in the tank. In the old days, this was a rubber coated transducer that one would hang in various locations in the tank and build up a 'map' of the power levels at different locations. It's good for finding dead zones as well as zones with too much power.

That's all I can think of off hand, hope I don't lead you too far astray.

Good luck with the project and be safe!

Register to Reply
2
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#2

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 11:40 AM

RVZ, assuming a rectangular tank, if all of the transducers were mounted on the bottom of the tank and fired upward then there should not be any cancellation. the bottom of the tank should move like a diaphragm if all of the transducers are in phase. when you drive them, drive them with a square wave instead of a sine. this will give you LOTS of odd harmonics to assist with the cleaning process too. one other thing, it is not a good idea to use any flammable liquids/solvents in the tank. a lot of people ignore this rule.

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Guru
United States - Member - USA! Hobbies - Musician - Sound Man Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - More than a Hobby Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: City of Roses.
Posts: 2056
Good Answers: 99
#3

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 1:12 PM

Thank you guys for the responses.

Now I'll need to choose some components...

Another question that has been rumbling around my head is whether to go with piezoelectric, or magnetostrictive Transducers... Does anyone know a reputable company to recommend for the purchase of the transducers?

I'm also wondering about the generating system. I have at my disposal a proper (lab bench style) signal generator, capable of any frequency and wave-type i would like, but obviously, this is a low powered device. So for the amplification of the input signal, I will need an amplifier. Now, thinking about as many parts and pieces that I can come up with for free... The thought of an Audio Amplifier has crossed my mind (I have some at my disposal). I know most Audio devices are designed to run from 20-20kHz. Would a Audio Amplifier work to provide power to the transducers, with my signal generator as the signal input? Maybe a slightly modified one? or will an audio amp not care what the input frequency is? How fast will a tube amp switch? Solid state?

So many questions rolling around in my head.

I really like the idea of using... say... a 1500w car Audio Amplifier, to beef up the signal coming from my signal generator, to power the transducers, But before I go and hook a bunch of stuff together, I need to figure a few things out, how high will the amp go... how much power do I realistically need. I don't want to end up like scotty... "I'm givin her all she's got capin!"

__________________
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet!
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#4
In reply to #3

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 3:01 PM

Most UT cleaners work around 40-100khz, some go even higher. your typical car audio amp just can't go that high. you can use a sine wave oscillator and overdrive the amp input to drive it into clipping and achieve the same end.

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42290
Good Answers: 1662
#5
In reply to #3

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 5:21 PM

I've used these guys on several projects, but I'm sure there are others. Nothing as big as you are attempting.

Good luck.

Branson

Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#6

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 5:36 PM

These guys are who I talked to when we were talking about rolling out own:

http://www.bluewaveinc.com/b7.htm

http://www.directindustry.com/prod/stoelting/magnetostrictive-ultrasonic-transducers-22599-549306.html

http://www.directindustry.com/prod/magnus-equipment-power-sonics/immersible-magnetostrictive-ultrasonic-transducers-22630-271615.html

http://www.blackstone-ney.com/pdfs/T_Mag_Vs_Piezo.pdf

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - USA! Hobbies - Musician - Sound Man Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - More than a Hobby Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: City of Roses.
Posts: 2056
Good Answers: 99
#7
In reply to #6

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 7:08 PM

I found a 1500W car audio amplifier rated to 40kHz, which gives me hope in a cheap solution for the power source.

Thank you for the links, will be looking into them all.

__________________
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet!
Register to Reply
Guru
Hobbies - HAM Radio - New Member United Kingdom - Big Ben - New Member Fans of Old Computers - Altair 8800 - New Member Canada - Member - New Member

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3968
Good Answers: 119
#8
In reply to #7

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 11:18 PM

ultrasonic whistle based on pumped liquid through a cavity across a resonating blade can work here, and the energy is ducted into the tank. Use to make emulsions

Ultrasonic whistle search

Multiple magnetostrictive or piezoelectric transducers will also work, but you need to adhere them to the tank bottom with a strong hard glue that will not simply deform and fail to transmit. To avoid standing waves, a hollow fan blade to circulate the liquid will also reflect the sound from the metal-air interface within the blade, much like the mode stirrers (moving vanes) in microwave ovens do the same thing. If you do not want the fluid moved, but do want the standing waves stirred, make a hollow blade with zero pitch so it just reflects the sound, various possibilities suggest themselves.

__________________
Per Ardua Ad Astra
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster #1
#9

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 11:21 PM

i have given some thought to do the same thing for cleaning engine parts. i've considered using transformers from an older battery charger or a cheap ac welder.

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster #1
#11
In reply to #9

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 11:30 PM

the transformers seem to emmit sonic vibrations. it might be possible to solidly mout a few to the bottom of the tank an adjust the to the needed frequenzy.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1753
Good Answers: 59
#10

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/14/2011 11:30 PM

Electronics is my trade, and I know a few things from that angle.

A 1 kWatts unit for $4,000 seems incredibly cheap. the question is, is it any good, what is its life expectation? I would bet it is 1 kW AC input, and maybe 400 Watt electric output, and some fraction of that acoustic energy. A formidably dangerous device. It can do damage to you in a short order. Starting with not sticking hand into the water, not even in gloves. It works by shaking contaminations apart, including your tissues. You do not hear it, nor see it, but can overload you.

From the top of my head Texas Instruments builds specialty power chips, and boards to drive the piezoelectric transducers in the 100- 250(?) Watts range. these are needed, because normal amplifiers do not tolerate the heavily capacitive loads the transducers present. The amplifiers some proposed, wimp out or burn out at the frequencies (somewhere 40 - 200kHz) with the capacitive loads.

For cleaning purposes, multiple drivers should NOT be synchronised. The cancellations should wander around for an overall cleaning. Did you give a thought, how will the inside a long manifold be cleaned? Outside aiming a transducer right into the opening, that is?

A transducer has to be acoustically and mechanically properly coupled to the fluid. Otherwise it absorbs the energy and explodes. I have little confidence, that an inexpensive device is doing it correctly. Copying good design is the best.

The energy produced should not leave the bath. Like radio fields, there is a maximum permissible field where people move around. The can have to have a lid and surrounded by absorbent panels, that swallows up the "escaped" ultrasound. Medical devices, like the one to break up kidney stones can get away without it, as the patient get a single short treatment, and the nurse steps away into the next room.

That much for now.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Germany 49° 26' N, 7° 46' O
Posts: 1950
Good Answers: 109
#12

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 3:49 AM

I have an old US-bath with a magnetostrictive transducer at the bottom.

I will bring it to life again by a cars audio-amplifier - this was built in the area when only 20KHz was used.

It will need near 5 A DC to pre-magnetise the coil and transformer legs to bring it to a good operating point.

Added to this then the appropriate AC level will do the job.

But: I do not have an idea about the auto-tune circuit needed for this.

This is s a mechanical oscillator coupled to a magnetostrictive transformer - how to model this?

Some general remarks:

Only degassed water (let it run for 15 minutes or use freshly boiled water) will do a proper job.

Any other liquid will contain a mixture of unwanted liquid and evaporating (in the small bubbles at low pressure) readily and thus condensing early on collapse of the bubbles and working as shock absorbers.

The intensity on hard metallic surfaces is very high - so the uppermost layer (? 1┬Ám ?) will come out deformed and compressed and totally changed in chemical specifications of the surface - not much influenced the mechanical appearance.!

Todays piezo transducers most often fail by non-adequate coupling the energy into the tank (empty) so at reflecting the wave the glue is overheated, it comes off and then the heat destroys the piezo.

Old fashioned nickel does not have this problem as it was brazed to the SS-tank.

So I would suggest to you to get some nickel plate, cut it to existing dimensions, wire it and try.

I can measure my system - no problem.

I used for a similar problem (HF-heating) an outdated Advanced Energy generator, (1.5KW for 1000$) got some problems with adding a tunable (high voltage high current !) capacitor as this generator had only a resistive impedance match to the load.

Unfortunately I attached the coil (12 turns 20cm diameter in air) with soft solder. This did melt at above 150 amps in the coil, opened it with a flash and killed the generator.

Have success - may be we can do the job together!

The photo shows a bottom view of this transducer.

RHABE

Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 116
Good Answers: 4
#13

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 3:55 AM

Hi R

I know you are experienced in hydraulics so I add these comments with care.

My background says the way to clean complex items that have drill ways etc is to force thro' a thin fluid (parafinn/cleaning solvent) around 1-3 cst in a turbulent flow manner. This causes cavitation and scouring of the passages exciting contamination and causing it to flow out of the manifold. Once out of course cleaning becomes so much simpler by conventional means. The way to check the cleanliness is to monitor the exiting fluid and once it shows it is clean to an acceptable standard run the process for a further 'x' minutes and call it a day.

Regards

Oliver Dunthorne

Hydraulic Engineer

PS Did you ever do the special site for hydraulics?

Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - USA! Hobbies - Musician - Sound Man Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - More than a Hobby Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: City of Roses.
Posts: 2056
Good Answers: 99
#19
In reply to #13

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 11:25 AM

We are currently flushing them with clean filtered oil, and taking oil samples with one of our ISO particle counters to ensure no contamination.

\However, there is new interest in ultrasonics. One of our customers wanted to have some parts cleaned ultrasonically, and when attempting to find a company who would do it, all of us failed to find ANYONE local who could do the job.

I could not find one single company capable of cleaning these parts in Oregon, or Washington. So the mindset turned to "Well, Why don't we build/buy one, and offer the service".

__________________
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet!
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#20
In reply to #19

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 11:53 AM

be careful cleaning hydraulic parts, particularly valves, as the vibration can damage valve seats etc, plus you have to actuate the valves while in the tank to ensure that all parts of the valve get cleaned.

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - USA! Hobbies - Musician - Sound Man Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - More than a Hobby Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: City of Roses.
Posts: 2056
Good Answers: 99
#21
In reply to #20

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 12:14 PM

The manifolds will be completely stripped of all components, leaving only a hunk of metal Swiss cheese. We typically will replace the valves and rebuild the assembly. Flushing a Manifold can be a very labor intensive task, plugging holes, plumbing hose to and from one port to another, and surging high flow fluid though to dislodge any crud that has built up. It's the setup of the manifold which will take hours, if not days.

If we were able to simply strip down the manifold, submerge it into a cleaning tank, let the sound energy do most of the work of dislodging the crud, then giving it a nice solvent bath/wash, followed by a final blow through of clean filtered shop air, I think we could save vast amounts of time, with a better result (I hope).

We would ultimately use it for other components, such as filter housings, pump casings, and other misc non critical components.

I just can't believe half a dozen of us searched for the better part of a day for a company who provides ultrasonic parts cleaning services locally in the Oregon/Washington area, and we all failed. Plenty back east though.

__________________
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet!
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#22
In reply to #21

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 12:42 PM

there is a place here in town that we used called Filclean if memory serves that cleaned screens and filters for the refinery/petrochem industry. for tat matter have you looked on ebay for a used US cleaning tank? Westinghouse used to make them pretty big. I've seen some that are 24 x 36 and larger.

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 116
Good Answers: 4
#24
In reply to #21

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 2:03 PM

Hi Jazz

Try and find someone with a decent sized bath and give it a go. I know it has been tried many times before and I think you will find it does not work on the internal drillways. You need high velocity and turbolent flow conditions to dislodge contamination. Try before you buy

Regards

Oliver Dunthorne

Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: South Central Wisconsin
Posts: 35
Good Answers: 3
#14

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 8:22 AM

I have used Crest Ultrasonic for years and think they are about the best out there. They offer transducer bars and generators as well as fitted tank assemblies.

I would also recommend a swept wave frequency to avoid standing waves.

Good luck!

__________________
That which is watched, is optimized.........
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Indiana
Posts: 331
Good Answers: 10
#15

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 8:58 AM

Please contact your state's environmental compliance assistance office first. Most states have VOC rules that apply to the design of parts cleaners. If in Indiana, go to http://www.in.gov/legislative/iac/T03260/A00080.PDF?

We have been having problems with Safety Kleen units because they have an exhaust venting outside the building which is not allowed.

__________________
"We cannot sow thistles and reap clover. Nature simply does not run things that way. She goes by cause and effect." Napoleon Hill
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#16
In reply to #15

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 9:09 AM

That is only going to be an issue if solvents are used. soapy water probably would not be an issue unless the stuff being cleaned is covered in something that the EPA cares about.

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Indiana
Posts: 331
Good Answers: 10
#17
In reply to #16

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 9:19 AM

Yep, I guess I should have specified that. I wish all companies would just use soapy water! It would makes things much easier for us all.

__________________
"We cannot sow thistles and reap clover. Nature simply does not run things that way. She goes by cause and effect." Napoleon Hill
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 44.56024"N 15.307971E
Posts: 6380
Good Answers: 248
#18

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 10:55 AM

A few things to keep in mind once you build your cleaner:

Suspend the part above the bottom to prevent the weight of object from canceling the vibes from transducer.

If using detergent, use a minimal amount of non-foaming type, such as SPARKLEEN, or dish washer detergent.Too much detergent will kill the action by preventing bubble collapse .

The ultrasonic waves will clean parts inside and out as long as liquid has access to the area.

Leaving a part too long can damage it.I have seen high quality chrome plating lifted from brass when left too long in pure water.

The temperature inside of a collapsing bubble can exceed 10,00 degrees F, but very short duration, so be careful of liquid boiling over long periods.A high temp shutoff is recommended.

Please post plans if you succeed in your quest.

Good luck!

__________________
"A man never stands so tall as when he stoops to help a child." "Never argue with a stupid person.They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience"
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#23

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 12:45 PM

would this fit the bill? http://www.ebay.com/itm/Delta-Sonics-DT1021-Ultra-Sonic-Cleaning-Tank-21-x-10-/150653307879?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2313a30be7

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - USA! Hobbies - Musician - Sound Man Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - More than a Hobby Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: City of Roses.
Posts: 2056
Good Answers: 99
#25
In reply to #23

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 2:21 PM

Close, but not quite big enough. Seems to be a LOT of smaller units, but a fair shortage of large ones.

__________________
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet!
Register to Reply
Guru
Hobbies - Fishing - Old Salt Hobbies - CNC - New Member United States - US - Statue of Liberty - New Member

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Rosedale, Maryland USA
Posts: 5198
Good Answers: 266
#26

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/15/2011 2:44 PM

http://www.mpi-ultrasonics.com/tubular-mmm-transduc.html

Up to 1500 watts for cleaning applications

__________________
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving in a pretty, pristine body but rather to come sliding in sideways, all used up and exclaiming, "Wow, what a ride!"
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - USA! Hobbies - Musician - Sound Man Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - More than a Hobby Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: City of Roses.
Posts: 2056
Good Answers: 99
#27
In reply to #26

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

09/16/2011 1:48 AM

That's perfect! Now to find the proper power source on the cheap.

__________________
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet!
Register to Reply
Participant

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Spring, TX
Posts: 3
#28

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

11/11/2011 1:48 AM

I am planning on a small "large scale" DIY parts cleaner, mostly for automotive. This input is very helpful.

Register to Reply
Participant

Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2
#29
In reply to #28

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

01/25/2012 3:44 PM

I have just got some piezo transducers for my project but I can't find anywhere how to fix them to the tank, they have a loose 10mm screw in the middle, can I remove it and use the thread to fix them???

Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#30
In reply to #29

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

01/25/2012 3:50 PM

typically the 10mm screw it how it is fixed to the tan, not seeing how the transducer is made, I really can't say.

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Participant

Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2
#31
In reply to #30

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

01/25/2012 5:28 PM

Thanks for the reply, these are the transducers I have, the screws are fitted loosley in the threads on the base,

Register to Reply
Participant

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 2
#33
In reply to #31

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

02/12/2014 6:26 AM

To revive this thread, can someone tell me what is the fonction of these screws? Should they be removed before glueing the transducer to the tank?

Thanks in advance

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Petroleum Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Spring, Texas
Posts: 3403
Good Answers: 149
#35
In reply to #33

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

02/12/2014 7:55 AM

tuning perhaps?

__________________
Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Participant

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 2
#36
In reply to #35

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

02/12/2014 8:01 AM

Just got a reply from one Chinese manufacturer. It is used to fix transducer to the tank more securely. First is the bolt welded to the tank. Then you apply epoxy to the transducer and screw it firmly to the bolt.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Participant

Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1
#32

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

01/14/2013 5:31 PM

I would suggest to purchase a professionally made Ultrasonic Cleaner - it's not worth the risk of damaging parts or jewelry. Branson Ultrasonics Online just announced their new line of Ultrasonic cleaners - http://bit.ly/RC06gl - Might be worth taking a look.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 44.56024"N 15.307971E
Posts: 6380
Good Answers: 248
#34

Re: DIY Large-Scale Ultrasonic Parts Cleaner

02/12/2014 6:52 AM

When you do develop your cleaner, be aware that normal soap will not work well.The foam will kill the energy from the transducer.A small amount of Spar-Kleen,or dish-washer detergent,which does not foam,works best.Emphasis on a small amount;too much will also have detrimental effect on power.

You merely want to break the surface tension of the water, no more.

I have experienced plain water removing chrome plating from objects left in tank too long.This is due to cavitation, which creates microscopic explosions as hot as the surface of the sun,as well as very sharp pressure gradients.

There are valid therapeutic uses for ultrasound, but the power is very low in comparison to a parts cleaner.

Good luck.

__________________
"A man never stands so tall as when he stoops to help a child." "Never argue with a stupid person.They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience"
Register to Reply
Register to Reply 36 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

Anonymous Poster (2); aurizon (1); Gabe.at.spdftsh (1); HiTekRedNek (2); krill (2); leveles (1); lyn (1); Matty B (1); MrM (1); mrmrva (2); Oliver Dunthorne (2); ozzb (1); RHABE (1); Rorschach (9); RVZ717 (6); spooklight (1); WWkayaker (2)

Previous in Forum: RCBO'S   Next in Forum: Magnetic Field Repulsion

Advertisement