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Anonymous Poster #1

Two Engines of Aircraft

03/02/2013 8:44 AM

Will the two engines of aircraft work at the same time during flying? Or the second engine is only for emergency use such as first engine failure during flying?

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#1

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/02/2013 9:02 AM

Same as with your legs. You hop around on one leg until it gets tired, then switch and hop around on the other leg for a while.

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#2

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/02/2013 9:09 AM

Oh please spare us the pain!

Your questions are offensive.

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Anonymous Poster #1
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/02/2013 9:24 AM

If two engines are working at the same time,then how the aircraft will complete it's journey safely, if one engine fails during travel?That means there is no safety in air travel and nobody would like to face such a situation! In a car breakdown situation, we can use screw jack to lift it from the ground to do repair work. Unfortunately screw jack trick may not work in a flying aircraft!

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/02/2013 9:33 AM
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#5
In reply to #3

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/02/2013 11:02 AM

Are you really unaware that 2-engine airplanes are designed to continue flying on just one engine if the other engine fails? You sound like you've been living in a cave all of your life.

As for using a screw jack to change a tire - who needs that?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kcmCggUMdg

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Anonymous Poster #1
#7
In reply to #5

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/02/2013 11:41 AM

Thanks for the link youtube and the video is quite interesting.However, I am talking about engine problems during running and screw jack.Tire has no role in this discussion. By the way, a car's both rear wheels (rear left and rear right) failed.In this case, what technique we can use to remove those tires? any video available in youtube??

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#10
In reply to #7

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/03/2013 1:13 PM

Also perform an internet search for something so basic and common knowledge (have you not actually flown in an airplane or seen one on TV or at the movies?).

By the way, a car's both rear wheels (rear left and rear right) failed.In this case, what technique we can use to remove those tires?

You replace one at a time obviously.

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/04/2013 1:35 AM

Thanks for the reminder about internet search regarding this subject.However,Is it possible for the boarded passengers to identify howmany engines are working in an aircraft without any kind of detecting tool or digital display? If possible could you reveal the secret behind it?Otherwise let me know, which university is providing this kind of skill in this world for passengers? Will the aircraft crew inform each and every passenger about the number of working engines and it's specification before travel or during travel? Is it possible to identify the number of working engines and it's specification from T.V(Television) show and movies?If possible,could you reveal the secret behind it? By the way, you forgot to give a clear picture on both rear tire changing during running.How the vehicle will move forward after tire pucture?By using only one front tire or by using both front tires?I shall be highly grateful if you could provide a youtube link for a real time analysis to find the pros and cons of the procedure.

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#14
In reply to #11

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/04/2013 1:07 PM

If I ever board a plane with a pilot who I think might attempt to take-off without all engines functioning, I will de-plane ASAP. I'd advise you to do the same.

I know that 727's were/are allowed to ferry to maintenance facilities with one engine non-op, but only under certain conditions, most importantly, no passengers.

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#15
In reply to #11

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/04/2013 1:18 PM

If possible could you reveal the secret behind it?

Jet engines make a lot of noise when running so you can tell if one is off by comparing the noise of one side of the plane to the other. This is more complicated for 4 engine planes but can be done. For planes with prop engines you can see the blades whizzing around.

Alternatively the pilot will announce the problem over the intercom and likely divert to a closer airport.

Is it possible to identify the number of working engines and it's specification from T.V(Television) show and movies?

Yes, usually the characters will either blurt it out ("the number two engine just stopped") or alternatively the engine in question will uncharacteristically burst into flames or fall off completely.

By the way, you forgot to give a clear picture on both rear tire changing during running.

You don't try and change a tire while the vehicle is moving as it is a health and safety hazard.

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#6
In reply to #3

Re: Two Engines of aircraft

03/02/2013 11:23 AM

I'm going to resist my first impression that you are just trolling for trouble by asking silly questions. I will assume you have an inquisitive child like understanding of aircraft and think you've found a contradiction. You need a few things clarified.

An airplane needs all of the power its engines can make only when the pilot wishes to climb in altitude quickly. During level flight an airplane requires considerably less power. Every multiple engine plane is designed to operate with one engine turned OFF. Certainly the performance of the plane will not be as good as before and an unexpected engine failure will take time for the pilot to recover complete control. So an engine failure at the critical times of takeoff and landing can lead to disaster.

If an airplane loses all of their engines during flight then the airplane becomes a glider. Every airplane has a known glide ratio of how far forward the plane travels for every drop in altitude. So a pilot now has a range of distance to choose where to make an emergency landing.

Losing any or all engines in an airplane will certainly make landing more dangerous. This is an obvious failure mode that can happen. It has been anticipated by aircraft designer and pilot training to mitigate this type of a failure.

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#8

Re: Two Engines of Aircraft

03/02/2013 5:36 PM

I am only "legless" when both my legs fails to respond. Even then, a soft landing is usually possible, and I live to fly another day!

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#9

Re: Two Engines of Aircraft

03/02/2013 7:52 PM

Psychiatric help required?

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#12

Re: Two Engines of Aircraft

03/04/2013 10:05 AM

It may come as a surprise, then, to know that Boeing's 747 aircraft, for many decades an icon of long-distance air travel, will continue to fly with only one engine out of four actually running.

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#13
In reply to #12

Re: Two Engines of Aircraft

03/04/2013 12:58 PM

Would a fully loaded 747 be able to maintain altitude (any altitude) with one engine at full thrust?

[Reminds me of an old joke . . . "If that fourth engine quits, we'll never get down!"]

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#16
In reply to #13

Re: Two Engines of Aircraft

03/07/2013 9:49 PM

Yes, but at a reduced speed and altitude. But, man your leg is going to get tired fast if its one of the out broad engines running.

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