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Everyone Knows What a Test Instrument Looks Like

Posted February 01, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

For years, advances in instrument technology remained largely invisible to the user - or at least benign. Instruments got faster and more powerful, but "irrelevant" personality characteristics persisted. Virtual knobs and dials replaced their physical counterparts without changing their feel and function. This article analyzes some more substantive developments, including features that blur the line between one instrument and another. Oscilloscopes, for example, now offer capabilities that once required a spectrum analyzer. Displays can present results in multiple windows, a departure from the single-window norm. Even form-factors have changed beyond luggable instruments and instrument modules. One "oscilloscope-in-a-pen" even fits into your pocket.


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Re: Everyone Knows What a Test Instrument Looks Like

02/03/2015 11:50 AM

Question #1: can you build an entire lab of these instruments around an arduino or a raspberry pi?

Question #2: anyone know what the less expensive route is to reliable instruments?

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