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Protection or Profits from Polymers?

Posted December 04, 2007 9:40 AM

Medical implant material suppliers are being lured by profits offered by this $1 billion/year business, and many seem to be forgetting the expensive lesson learned by Dow Corning after its involvement with silicone breast implants forced it into bankruptcy in the 1990s. Armed with the legal protection of the Biomaterials Access Assurance Act of 1998, established companies and a growing number of start-ups are marketing implantables, forgoing risks in order to exploit growing demand for polymer-containing devices from an aging population. Dow Corning and others remain cautious about providing plastics to be used in the body longer than 30 days. As in the case of radiation, how safe is safe? Can legal protections safeguard the patient without hampering the manufacturer?

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Anonymous Poster
#1

Re: Protection or Profits from Polymers?

12/05/2007 1:26 PM

With some implantable plastic materials costing more than $1200 US per pound, the rewards to the material manufacturers outweigh the apparent risks. Some of that cost undoubtably goes to their insurance companies and their lawyers. If the potential rewards were not there, with such a huge potential for crushing litigation, no US manufacturers would dare to touch any material or component that is to be implanted. Is it such a surprise that medical costs are so high?

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Power-User

Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 153
Good Answers: 3
#2

Re: Protection or Profits from Polymers?

12/24/2007 9:47 PM

this opens up a can of worms. where have the reports about the use of LYDODURA and similar human derived tissue transplant material been kept? are they still the subject of litigation or wrongful death suits,which forces silence on the publication of actual or suspected results of thier useage e.g. the horrible death of dominique roy of quebec canada?

Seems funny that the 50,000 + rough estimate of americans have no idea what is in them when they recieved a patch of that type. the japanese and other countries health protectioon agency officials are still sluggging it out about the contaminats which are yet to be discovered in its' citizens who had the patch or other transplanted device delivered via a.b. melsungen.

equally intriguing is how the country got the money from the canadian government to set up shop here import ythe contaminated material then when the problems arose were funded to shut down thier operations take all the records (HA-HA) and leave wit impunity. too bad you americans you have a government whose officials are less than second rate amatuers when it come to hoodwinking its citizens about their health.

I can only say I KNOW this will read as being really SICK THINKING think that Nazi body part hunters would be killing themselves laughing at how ironic they are portrayed as inhuman while the very coutry whose government was one of that regimes fiercest opponents has kept its public ignorant of its complicity in this debacle in the dark.

last item has any research into the effect on human cranial nerve tissue abnd blood flow supply being negatively affected by electromagnetic or other r./m.f.i. generating devices after the implantation of exo thermic reacted polymers which were used to reconstruct portions of the human skull when the carbon molecule may have been inadvertently extended by the plastic surgeons over extending of timing of the catalytic reactive cycle's completion occurs?

would the makers or vendors of reconstructive devices care to reply to this question, with or without commencing punitive litigation?

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Power-User
Technical Fields - Technical Writing - Validation Specialist-Medical Devices United States - Member - From the Big Apple! Hobbies - Model Rocketry - Rockets should go nuclear! Fans of Old Computers - PDP 11 - Studied computers at W.H.Taft H.S., Bronx, NY. Popular Science - Cosmology - Radio Science Observing

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#3

Re: Protection or Profits from Polymers?

12/25/2007 8:21 PM

The use of plastics as part of an implantable device; be it cutaneous or subcutaneous; has become widespread. Reaction to these and other designer plastics could derive from the fact that these are probably contaminated from the beginning. A recent report cited that plastic imported for reuse is not recyclable and most probably toxic…

„Indonesia was importing foreign plastics for
recycling, but in 1992, after discovering that 40% of the
imported material was not recyclable and that approximately
10% of it was actually toxic, the government banned any further
importation of plastic waste.‰
(Lewis, D.L. and R. Chepesiuk, „The International Trade In
Toxic Waste: A Selected Bibliography Of Sources.‰
http://egj.lib.uidaho.edu/egj02/lewis01.html)

If this is the case then the process by which these plastics are reused and reprocessed for human use must be scrutinized and regulated vigorously. Is there any relation here?

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