Previous in Forum: Tank Leak Testing   Next in Forum: Jet Propelled Automobile
Close
Close
Close
10 comments
Commentator

Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 62

Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/06/2016 8:13 AM

I have a ESDV in a gas supply line to a powerplant. The gas is natural gas to be supplied to a gas turbine. I understand that the ESDV is flanged. Is there any particular reason behind this? Why a flanged connection and not welded?
I am aware that valves if flanged can be easily removed. Is it the only reason or their is something else.

Kindly guide me.

Register to Reply
Pathfinder Tags: ESDV fuel gas system piping valves
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mineral wells Tx
Posts: 630
Good Answers: 34
#1

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/06/2016 9:04 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0be9IhldkSM

Register to Reply
Guru
Safety - Hazmat - New Member United States - US - Statue of Liberty - New Member Engineering Fields - Chemical Engineering - Old Hand

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 14331
Good Answers: 161
#2

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/06/2016 4:48 PM

have you ever welded on a gas pipeline? I didn't think so.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member Engineering Fields - Piping Design Engineering - New Member

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Richland, WA, USA
Posts: 21006
Good Answers: 781
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/06/2016 5:13 PM

Somebody had to weld the companion flanges to the pipe.

__________________
In vino veritas; in cervisia carmen; in aqua E. coli.
Register to Reply
Guru
United States - Member - Hobbies - Fishing - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Hobbies - RC Aircraft - New Member Engineering Fields - Aerospace Engineering - New Member

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Saint Helens, Oregon
Posts: 2214
Good Answers: 69
#4

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/06/2016 5:58 PM

Common sense tells me if it has any moving parts, then it should be easily replace in case of failure, with a minimum amount of downtime. After all, "Time is Money"

__________________
Confucius once said, “ Ability will never catch up with the demand for it".
Register to Reply
Guru
Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member Engineering Fields - Piping Design Engineering - New Member

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Richland, WA, USA
Posts: 21006
Good Answers: 781
#5
In reply to #4

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/06/2016 6:09 PM

Flanges on the pipe connection sides are not always necessary for that; valves can often be designed so that all renewable parts are accessible via top and bottom flanges. This can save weight, alignment labor, gasket, and hardware costs.

__________________
In vino veritas; in cervisia carmen; in aqua E. coli.
Register to Reply
3
Power-User

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Port Glasgow, Free Republic of Scotland
Posts: 359
Good Answers: 30
#6

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/07/2016 1:15 AM

The use of flanged or welded valves is governed by company or national standards or international bodies.

My quick scan of API 616 (for gas turbines in oil and gas industry sec 5.8 for fuel gas - note I am a PROCESS engineer not a MECHANICAL) is that it does not specify a connection type and so either are acceptable.

However mayor oil / chemical companies will have their own standards. My personal feeling is that i would expect the valves to be flanged, much along with dj94501's comments. I would also add that a flanged connection provides a space to insert a blind for fully secure isolation during maintenance.

However Tornado is quite right that valves can be manufactured to be fully disassembled via the top connection and so it is not necessary to remove the valve body when the components and seats can be removed.

However you will need to go back to whatever the governing document is for your system.

__________________
Free advice guaranteed or your money back
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 3)
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: sometimes Wales,UK.. was Libya, now Oman!
Posts: 1715
Good Answers: 116
#7

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/07/2016 2:06 AM

asked and answered!

ps.. its "THERE" not THEIR

__________________
The square root of nothing is what you make it!
Register to Reply
Commentator

Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 62
#8

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/07/2016 2:32 AM

Okay. Thanks everyone for your valuable replies and suggestions. The conclusion is that the standards governing the project will define the type of valve to be used.

Register to Reply
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Indeterminate Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: In the bothy, 7 chains down the line from Dodman's Lane level crossing, in the nation formerly known as Great Britain. Kettle's on.
Posts: 30461
Good Answers: 819
#9
In reply to #8

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/07/2016 5:48 AM

...and the forum cannot see them from here.

__________________
"Did you get my e-mail?" - "The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place" - George Bernard Shaw, 1856
Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 5
#10

Re: Emergency Shutdown Valve (ESDV) Flanged Connection

07/08/2016 9:46 AM

Agree with prev comments. If governing body doesn't specify, then either works. From the manufacturer point of view, welded connection with removable inner workings since they are usually more economical with less lead time, but some manufacturers like dealing with flanges regardless. The fluid type ESDV's I am used to seeing are either globe or gate type (metal seat) and usually have flanges as they are typically directed by shipbuilding Rules at or on the fuel tanks. Gas type on LNG vessels could be either as they are located outside of the machinery space before the double wall pipe requirement. From an owner/operator perspective, flanges seem to be the often choice for easy/quick replacement.

Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Register to Reply 10 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

brich (1); dj95401 (1); dreamz (1); EJL (1); James Stewart (1); PWSlack (1); simonsd (1); Tornado (2); Whitephone (1)

Previous in Forum: Tank Leak Testing   Next in Forum: Jet Propelled Automobile

Advertisement