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What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/24/2016 6:45 PM

Just bought a small house in Bristol, Tennessee. In case the power goes out, I want a backup in the basement where there is an opening in the chimney for a flue. No fireplace, must have been an oil heater there once. House built in the 60's, block walls from basement to roof, apparently not insulated. Good insulation in attic.

The chimney looks good, 9" terra cotta liner, clean as a whistle.

I like the efficiency of the front-loading longish stove (Euro style, apparently) or a downdraft unit, which also has good efficiency. EPA approval is a must with the insurance company, and they have secondary burn.

Of course, price is important. I really want to stay under $1000 on this. Any recommendations?

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#1

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/24/2016 7:25 PM

Two pieces of advice.

1. Consider how you will get wood down to the basement.

2. Considering #1, is wood the right fuel for this house?

Were it me, I'd go to the local stove sellers and ask them.

Wood Stove Installation in Bristol, Tennessee with Reviews & Ratings ...

Wood Stoves | Johnson City, Bristol, Kingsport, TN; Abingdon, VA ...

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#16
In reply to #1

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 10:19 PM

I'd go nuclear, just like Putin.

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#2

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/24/2016 7:38 PM

Wood is not the cleanest or the most economical way to heat a house in more ways then one.

a number of Issues/problems.

- labor (Hauling wood)

- costs ($/cord)

- insects (ants on infested wood, happens)

- cleanliness (bark, smoke when firing up)

- maintenance (ash, chimney sweep)

just to name a few.

i myself, being raised on a farm, working out in the dead of winter, chilled to the core and loved coming in and warming up next to a wood stove), that is e best type of heat.

i only posted this, because it's still up to for you to decide.

my brother just bought and installed an outside wood boiler. He doesn't have to split the wood, and can through in up to 8"-10" diameter and 48" long sticks. The only thing I see with an outside furnace, is the chimney isn't high enough depending on the weather.

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#3

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/24/2016 8:29 PM

How do you propose to get the heat from the stove to the living space?

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#4

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/24/2016 8:43 PM

I'd go with a stove you can cook with, as a back up it should be multipurpose is my way of thinking.....a good stove can heat the whole house, cook all your meals, and last forever....

http://www.ebay.com/bhp/wood-cook-stove

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#5
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/24/2016 9:01 PM
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#7
In reply to #4

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 3:22 AM

One of a range of options, then?

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#9
In reply to #4

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 12:30 PM

Mrs K would love if you got her this!

Drew K

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#10
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 12:46 PM

Does this have a 220V electric option, with a glass cook top?

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#6

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/24/2016 10:40 PM

I know someone with one of these small glass front wood burners in the basement of a pretty tidy home. They use it as supplemental heat throughout the winter. It's radiates enough heat that their gas furnace almost never needs to kick on. And their gas bill is a fraction of what it would be if it weren't in use.

I'm a big fan of the thing and will consider something similar for my place. ..maybe next year.

I'm with Solar E. I'd like to find one that can really cook.. I've seen some with built in pizza ovens etc, but you need to raise more dough for those.. (groan)

I like the pellet stoves too, but i like the Idea of picking my combustable

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#8

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 9:46 AM

Consider a "pellet stove".

I've been cutting, splitting, lugging, lugging, lugging, and burning wood for many years. Thinking seriously of converting to a pellet stove. Just have the pellets delivered and you then put into the stove.

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#12
In reply to #8

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 2:42 PM

I had used a excel program from the Forestry service for a comparison of values when I was assigned to make a value added product from our excess charcoal (Making Pellets)

unfortunatly, I have it at work.

i did a quick search and came across the University of Purdue use the program that looks like the one I used.

its interesting, to find out the value comparison between wood, pellets, NG, cool.

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#11

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 1:04 PM

When I lived in Virginia, was in college, and therefore poor, I heated my home with a woodstove.

I cut, split, hauled and stacked 5 cords a year by myself. I was a little more spry back then.

I bought a used stove that was handmade by a welder. It was double walled, 3/8" plate steel. The firebox was 42" x 42" x 42". The floor was lined with firebrick. It had double doors each with a round screw down damper wheel. You could let her breathe or choke her down so 6 pieces of wood could heat all night. It took 4 of us to get it in the house.

I fashioned an aluminum duct out of flashing and pop rivits, and connected a squirrel cage fan to the back, where there was a hole for entering the double wall area. There were 12 holes, 1/2" diameter drilled in the front on each side for the forced air to escape.

This thing would run you out if you weren't careful. Plus, I frequently cooked a pot of beans and smoked pork hock on top.

My 2, find a used one that you can't pick up. It will last forever.

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#13

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 7:09 PM

Alternative heat user here too!

I went the DIY burn everything incinerator type boiler system ~15 years ago. I burned about 12 - 15 cords of wood and pretty much anything else that would burn in it as well. Wood, coal, garbage, tires, railroad and bridge timber if it was solid and could burn I used it for heat at least once!

I gave it a brain so it could figure out what was burning and make the needed adjustments to work with my house thermostats and backup propane furnace heat seamlessly.

After about 10 years i converted it to burn used oil and haven't went back.

In fact the old boiler started leaking bad last winter so the last week I have been working on building a new mini boiler that will be in my work shed next to the old house and will run as a dedicated used oil unit.

That's where I ended today. I still have to put the chimney in plus convert a old fuel oil furnace burner over to run used oil and make the new control box to integrate this one with the old house systems.

Personally if a guy has any metal fabrication skills or knows someone who does (that wont rip a guy off on labor) a outdoor boiler system is the way to go. You don't have to process your wood down to anything less than what ever you physical carrying capacity is plus all the smoke and general mess stays outside the house too!

On top of that if it has a large firebox and water jacket capacity you don't have to be fussy about the grade of wood you burn which make finding usable wood for heat much cheaper and easier.

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#14
In reply to #13

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 8:25 PM

12-15 cords, that is a lot of wood. It sounds pretty hungry.

Dimensional how big is your firebox... or maybe, I should ask, how big of a piece of firewood can you stuff in there.

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#15
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 9:49 PM

24" square by 54" deep. Anything under 12" dia and 48" long was all the smaller I needed to cut things.

Old trailer houses are like trying to heat a parking lot. It's doable but not efficiently hence the reason for building it. The first two winters I had the house I was burning through a 500 gallon propane tank load in a month just keeping the place barely tolerable to live in.

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#22
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 9:13 AM

We grew up in an old farm house. Cold and drafty.

We logged and collected firewood in the wintertime. And when we were in the woods, I complained to my dad, that we collect a lot of firewood to heat the house. I remember my dad saying heating this house is like heating a god dam corncrib. I laughed about that that whole day...I still laugh about it.

btw, here's a picture of a corncrib.

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#24
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 2:06 PM

That is a very fitting description of heating this old place too!

Like heating a corn crib in the winter and air conditioning a greenhouse in the summer.

I grew up in a house like that where we had the cheapest fireplace money barely bought.

3/4's of a cord of wood a week was normal and I got my butt chewed for not keeping up because that was primarily my job and no one seemed to understand how closing the flue made it more efficient.

The biggest insult was once I got out of high school and left for college the firewood job fell to my brother and by good that lasted one winter before a brand new high efficiency unit plus major house insulation went in and if anyone left that flue damper open they caught hell.

Main reason was he was to friggin lazy and unreliable to do that much wood a week so something had to be done to correct it.

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#25
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 2:42 PM

It was ok, once we had enough snow so we could pack around the house. (When we remondeled) there was actually logs behind the plaster.

When we replaced our boiler, it was a very good boiler, it and could easily keep up, ore btu's put out with less wood.

we had 2 rooms 12' x 12' and by 72-76" high both stacked full of wood. That's about 13-14 full cords of wood. It'll carry us through February-March maybe even April if it was a mild winter.

after the new boiler, that was cut down to about 8 cords.

at the time, we didn't think much about it. The drafty house that is.

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#27
In reply to #25

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 6:57 PM

Back when we had a few real bad winters in the early mid 2000's I did the snowpack thing too. I went around the house with the snow blower and backfilled everything right to the roof along with 4" - 6" on the roof.

Wow! Did that cut the wood burning rate down! Interesting thing was the snow would move out from the house about 1" a week from radiant thermal loss and the lowest loss points were around the newer windows on the one side of the house.

Pretty sad when a cheap window has higher R value than the wall its mounted in.

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#30
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/27/2016 4:43 AM

Pretty sad when a cheap window has higher R value than the wall its mounted in.

How true!!!

We insulated the outside of our house (10 years ago) and brought our heating costs per year back to that of 1986!!

That is ignoring the drop in the value of money since then, so it's actually a bigger saving that it looks!

We paid out around DM1800 per year for gas then (heating and hot water), now we pay about €900, gas and wood pellets.

It was a 2:1 difference when the Euro was started....so DM1800 is the same as €900!

I could work out the drop in actual value as well, but I am too lazy today......but its probably another 30-40%.

So insulating and new windows are a really good investment!!

The comfort factor cannot be easily turned into a money value.

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#19
In reply to #13

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 8:23 AM

Love the work! But I wan't to see the plumbing that was added! Grr..

I've been thinking about my garage heat.. I've been considering something almost as beautiful for a long time. Now i have to up my game.

In the meantime.. I'll choke by with what I've got.

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#17

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/25/2016 10:39 PM

Check out a Woodstock Soapstone Ideal Steal Woodstove here: http://www.woodstove.com/ideal-steel-hybrid. It's more money but you save because it's the most efficient woodstove on the market.

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#18

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 3:34 AM

First decision to make, should you be able to get heat into other rooms of the building? Obviously no electric pump, though a small Solar system with battery storage could make that possible.

Many years ago, careful design allowed the warm water to rise through convection and warm a whole house, though the pipes need to be larger than is common today to achieve this....

In our house in the 50's, both the fire in the morning room and lounge could heat hot water for bathing and washing in this way, to almost boiling if needed!!

No electric required.

Or you could transport warm air to other rooms, also without electricity with a careful design, or again solar might help.....

A word of warning, if you are not "wood-stove" aware, you can make some really stunning explosions with them if you are not careful!! There are a few videos on Youtube to show what can happen if a stove is shutdown hot, and then air gets in!!

small explosion!!

Be careful!! Sometimes people and property get REALLY hurt!!

Perhaps you could expand on the detail, which will allow better ideas to be posted....?

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#20
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 8:25 AM

.. that was a pretty exciting little 'snuff film' .. lol thanks for the warning.

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#21
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 8:54 AM

Too often, in the learning phase, such things can get dangerous, I am all for safety.....

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#29
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Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 10:05 PM

I would love to figure out a way to store excess heat from the stove, like a hot water tank. The stove comes with really good instructions that stress having plenty of heat going up the chimney to avoid creosote buildup. Either the creosote must be burned up completely in the stove or it has to be carried away forcefully to avoid a chimney fire.

Maybe a heater designed to heat water and store it in a nearby tank would throw off enough heat to warm the house, too. From what I've read so far, heating water cools the exhaust too much. This would take a lot more research, maybe another thread later, once I've gotten accustomed to burning wood.

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#32
In reply to #29

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/27/2016 4:54 AM

A so called "Back Boiler" is what you need, it is heated directly by the flames, not from the smoke.

When wood is correctly dried and burnt in a modern stove, there should be no smoke, this means that the "bad stuff" has all been burnt, no creosote.....

The best stoves have a small hot fire, and not a large cooler one.....which is why pellets are such a great alternative and can be started and stopped at will with a timer!!

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#23

Re: What wood stove to buy?

11/26/2016 12:05 PM

Check out Vermont Wood Stoves. I have one and love it. I have never experienced a single problem with it, and it's very efficient as well.

Warning: they aren't cheap! You get what you pay for...

Maybe you can find a used one locally on Craig's List or whatever.

Make sure you can effectively get the heat up from the basement area to your living spaces above, otherwise you're just spinning your wheels.

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#26

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/26/2016 6:54 PM

Just one small item to check first: Your house insurance - we had to remove a stove when the insurance company inspected it and found the chimney wasn't suitable. If yours is truly abandoned and lined with clay tile, it may be ok.

By keeping it stoked with wood, you'll never mind the cold - just working up a sweat carrying the wood in.

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#28

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/26/2016 9:43 PM

Thanks to all for the replies. My basement is walk-in, with the wood stacked right outside on a sidewalk under the covered deck above. In the room with the flue are two registers to the living room above. Also, heat could escape from the flue room to the rest of the basement, and up the stairs if the door is open.

I'm trying to decide between the glass front unit or the simple, cheap one configured like a mailbox, opening on the end (front). The simple one has EPA approval, secondary burn. Very strange, the instructions for it say to pile the wood heaviest on bottom, kindling on top. It must burn downwards somehow, it has an air pipe that runs around the top of the fire area, with small holes in it. I presume the exhaust gasses escape to the secondary burn area around a baffle. I will have to look at it at the store that sells it nearby.

The main benefit of the glass front one is being able to see the fire, to know when to re-load. I would love to burn up all the twigs from my trees, but am not sure if it will have diminishing returns, ie, too much trouble for the heat, and too much smoke from opening the door too much.

It's interesting to see the EPA stoves have little control, wanting the stove to run fast and hot to burn up all creosote and wood gas. I can understand this, a slow stove probably smokes, and that is polluting.

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#31
In reply to #28

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 4:51 AM

You said:- ....a slow stove probably smokes, and that is polluting.

That smoke has a lot of unused energy in it, its also called "wood gas". When mixed with air it is highly explosive. That can happen when you open the door at the wrong time. You need to open the vent to allow it to "burn off" before opening the door.

Also, a good stove does not allow you to completely shut down the air/exhaust flow, reducing the possibility of the "big bang" dramatically....but not eliminating it.

Burning wood with too much moisture, too young, or badly stored, it does not matter, makes the problem worse. You also need to have a meter to check the wood before burning....

The glass door may be a good idea for many reasons....

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#34
In reply to #28

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 8:13 AM

Those little twigs add an intense amount of heat over a shorter period of time. You can easily add them when up to heat. There is not a lot of smoke created unless you add too much at once and / or they are not dry. IMO And you're right about seeing the fire with the grass front.. In addition to making the stoking that much more enjoyable you can see how well a fire is burning for a much longer time than you would with no view. (you'll think it's out when it's doing quite well) ..which allows you to stoke with the right order of material and maintain that nice blaze.

That said.. the twigs and beer /rum / whatever are a better companion for when you can monitor the hearth and add combustibles slowly, but the chunky wood will get you through the night.

imo

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#33

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 8:12 AM

Creosote buildup is not a problem if you get your stack temperature up over 600 - 800 F a few times a week is is almost unavoidable if you starting your fires the right way by letting them get up to a good hot clean burn before shutting the dampers down.

As far as the EPA's view that wood is a polluter they can go stuff red hot burning log up their ass over that reasoning. Wood from start to finish is a net neutral pollution fuel.

Same with the companies claiming their fireplaces are high efficiency and clean BS. They use a fuel source that is inherently free to anyone who has any ability to think and gather their wood themselves which makes their upper end efficiency irrelevant. That and you can only take so much heat out of a wood fire before it starts condensing the creosote and everything else out of the smoke.

If you want to actually benefit from burning wood find a simple well built old fashioned heavy steel or cast iron unit and use it the way it was intended to be used and if you insurance company doesn't like it tell them to go stuff it and change companies. You pay them to insure you, not tell you how to run your life.

A number of years ago I had some guy show up at my place and start taking pictures. I asked him who he was and he said he was with my insurance company and he was here to review my property for policy updates. I asked him how that will affect things he said I had a number of potential liability issues that will be putting me in higher price bracket. Basically they were dropping my fire protection part of my policy and raising everything else because I have a welder, plasma cutter and torch systems in my shop and my own construction machinery.

I told him they don't need to worry about updating anything because they do not tell me how to live, what I can own and what work I can or cannot do on my property I meant it.

The company branch I am with now is owned and operated by my neighbors who they themselves run a contracting and construction company and they said that if they are insured for what they do I am definitely insured for what I do as well. (And they are way cheaper for a way better policy too!)

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#35
In reply to #33

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 9:04 AM

You know the old saying "there is no smoke without fire!"

But in a well made and properly used wood burner, with properly dried wood, there is "fire without smoke!"

If there is no smoke,there is basically no creosote either!

So the problems of "condensing out" simply does not happen.....

Tests here have shown that a single smoky wood fire can pollute the air around that house for many miles. The smoke is ultra fine particles that the lungs cannot get rid of if inhaled. And the creosote problem.....

wood-smoke-and-your-health

In Germany and Austria, there are plans to eventually to require each and every chimney with a wood burner, no matter how efficient they are according to the user, a scrubber, to remove all the fine particles, electrostatically. Not cheap.

But not wood pellets burners as generally speaking, they are so well built, that they are considered on average to put out around a 100 times less fine particles and no creosote and other chemicals. They smoke only for a few seconds before igniting.

For someone considering a new stove of any sort, this may prove interesting:-

wood-and-pellet-heating

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#38
In reply to #35

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 12:17 PM

"Tests here have shown that a single smoky wood fire can pollute the air around that house for many miles. The smoke is ultra fine particles that the lungs cannot get rid of if inhaled. And the creosote problem....."

What tests? who's tests? This sounds like anti fireplace and wood burning BS propaganda science to me?

If one wood fire miles away is polluting that bad how do you guys handle a windy day and all the ground particulates it picks up? I mean common dirt is loaded with toxic particulates like naturally occurring silicates and in many places even asbestos micro fibers and let's not forget all that radon and other NORM's too!

And what about all those delicious smoked meats and cheeses? Cripes, the wood fire particulates count on and in them ought to be fatal just with just one bite.

Or those fancy incense sticks? What's the toxic wood particulate count from burning one of them in a closed room?

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#39
In reply to #38

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 12:44 PM

If you can read German, I will find all the technical articles for you.......your choice.

If you don't understand the difference between digesting smoke particles (we even have smoke beer here!) and breathing them in, then nothing I can say will change your mind!! But there is a HUGE difference.

Your own EPA, in a link I posted, said exactly the same thing......

Also see here:-

http://www.cdc.gov/air/particulate_matter.html

Where you can read the following:-

Particle Pollution and Your Health

Breathing in particle pollution can be harmful to your health. Coarse (bigger) particles, called PM10, can irritate your eyes, nose, and throat. Dust from roads, farms, dry riverbeds, construction sites, and mines are types of PM10.

Fine (smaller) particles, called PM2.5, are more dangerous because they can get into the deep parts of your lungs — or even into your blood.

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#40
In reply to #39

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 4:47 PM

"Your own EPA, in a link I posted, said exactly the same thing......"

Our EPA has an agenda lies to achieve it and everyone knows it. In act over half our nations states now have various lawsuits against them regarding their overstepping their boundaries and lying about what's a real issue and what's not in order to achieve it.

As far as wood fire smoke from a home fireplace goes if you want to be afraid of it because some regulatory agency report says you should that your business, not mine.

I have bigger boogeymen in my world to worry about than what's coming out of some small wood fire far from me.

BTGW most of that EPA BS regulation are from pressure from far left enviro extremists not real rationally studied and justified scientific research and several states already have no intention of following their regulations and many more are likely to follow assuming President Trump doesn't kick most of them out of their regulatory positions.

EPA fireplace emission regulations questioned for validity.

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#43
In reply to #40

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 3:18 AM

Of course smoke is harmful, just look at any smoker!!!

But it always good to have plenty of gullible people around that do not believe simple, proven facts, facts proven over many years!

That's how Trump won!!!

I read the link, it reads like the a document from the NRA!! "Bullets are good for you!"

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#44
In reply to #43

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 7:36 AM

Our company, we make liquid smoke, even though we are grandfathered in on some processes, when it comes to the EPA, its a nightmare. And we have to really bounce around to meet the requirements

We run the gases through a bio-filter. When we took the readings, there was a significant amount of CO around the Bio-filter. So now I'm designing a stack to by-pass the filter, to meet EPA, DNR and a few others departmental requirements.

  • EPA: Environmental Protection Agency
  • DNR: Department of Natural Resources
  • OSHA: Occupational Safety and Health Agency

Which reminds me of a sayings that came up from my grade school 'Weekly Reader', which is; The solution to pollution is dilution.

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#47
In reply to #44

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 11:09 AM

"Which reminds me of a sayings that came up from my grade school 'Weekly Reader', which is; The solution to pollution is dilution. "

Yea some people do have a hard time correlating concentration and exposure time to the reality of what is actually harmful or not and when it passed the line from being harmless to harmful.

Theres a huge difference between a 10,000+ PPM 12+ hours a day (head literally down a chimney) exposure and a trace scenting in the air now and then one. (Mmmm, Someone has a fire going today.)

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#48
In reply to #47

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 11:21 AM

The problem that we had, was the heavy gases would flow over our bio-filter, which is nothing more than a carbon capture unit.

Anyways, Bio-filter is build up on top of a mound. The gases would flow over the containment wall and down the mound and collect in the low spots. Which is very dangerous.

And as long as whe hit the emissions, which we will, delusion is fine.

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#49
In reply to #48

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 11:36 AM

"And as long as whe hit the emissions, which we will, delusion is fine."

Same as always.

Dumping 10 tones of X into the air is bad but dumping 10 tons of X into the local environment air once it been diluted with more air from the same local environment (and lots of money has been spent to do it) makes it different and now okay.

Vehicle smog Pump and modern engine camshaft profile design 101 basics. Anything labeled harmfull if diluted with enough regulatory based cash is okay or at lest it will be okay until some study shows that more cash is needed.

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#50
In reply to #49

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 11:39 AM

where there a problem, is over burdening your environment such as Los Angeles, CA or Bejing CN

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#46
In reply to #43

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 11:03 AM

This is an engineering forum you know.

Put some numbers behind your comparisons so we can see how you're justifying these relations between cigarette smoke and fireplace smoke being equally bad for you despite their vastly different exposure level.

Reason being as of right now your implying concentration level has nothing to do with anything and fireplace smoke from a half mile or more away is just as bad for you as smoking cigarette?

With those wildfires we have that are out of control is the whole of the US going to die from lung cancer like we all took up 5 pack a day smoking habits in the last few weeks?

So how do you heat your house? I hope its not by burning propane or natural gas because that stuff puts off CO2 at neat 100% concentrations which by your apparent correlation fireplace smoke and cigarette being the same if you are standing outside your house you will suffocate from yo chimney exhaust.

But then if you all electric, crap! that much electrical power going through your house is just like sticking a your head in a microwave being both are parts of the EM spectrum therefore if being exposed to a unshielded multi KW microwave oven would kill you then by default the EM field from your heating systems are doing the same.

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#51
In reply to #46

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 12:04 PM

I must compliment you on getting the highest dosage of crap information and bad attitude in such few words, with your posts, simply unbelievable!!.

I myself have nothing to prove, as far better scientists and engineers than myself (or you!), have done it all for us already....and documented it well, so that even your average school kid can easily understand it!!

It parallels similar information here in Germany and Austria, with basically the same results and conclusions! What a surprise!!

As you are the "unbeliever", you should be proving them all to be wrong, not me trying to prove them right when they are already right!!

As I, and several others here, really don't give a shit whether you believe it or not, thats your funeral!!

Rant over!!

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#52
In reply to #51

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 2:03 PM

So basically you're saying you can't find any credible data to post that gives any valid numbers regarding concentration levels Vs exposure times to back up your claims that wood smoke for a home fireplace at any distance is equally as harmful as smoking any number of cigarettes then?

Me neither.

Oh wait. I did!

No serious harm breathing wood smoke

Dang Nords and their unbiased environmental impact and health research.

It would appear that to get wood smoke to a level of being dangerous for a normal healthy person with average lungs you would have to dang near 'hot box' yourself with an open fire to do it.

Seems the EPA doesn't have much issue with it either for healthy people until it gets into high concentration levels.

EPA Smoke index.

OMG! A windy day kicking up dust is one common source of 'potentially harmful airborne particulates'. Who would frigging guessed?

Dust Storms contribute to atmospheric particulates levels.

But wait. Theres that dang concentration level Vs time and plausibility thing.

Of every document I have read every one says 'maybe linked to such and such' not 'is a direct progenitor of' as in if it has been a high level long and or term exposure it may play a contributing factor in the onset of some other condition.

Now the thing is, way too much of what I read seems to do it's best to assume the worst case scenarios for the weakest people in the most circumstantial conditions all while not providing any solid definable data to back up said claims and then suggest that its standard one size fits all for any and everyone every where regardelss of their age health or actual realistic lifetime exposure levels.

To me that's little more than typical scaremongering tactics that imply any exposure is bad and ultimately going to kill you and not real statistically backed data based on typical not ideal and circumstantial conditions because in normal typical conditions the extreme vast majority of times it's well below any definable danger threshold and that awfully boring and nothing anyone would bother to worry about.

WHO Household Air Pollution data.

High level long term exposure to wood smoke and other pollutants inside their own homes has been shown to have contributed to the many respiratory diseases and the deaths those disease caused. Not the sole defining source or factor in those deaths.

BTW ~3 billion people heat and cook primarily with wood and ~4.3 million a year die from diseases that may have contributing factors from wood smoke but did not die solely from wood smoke exposure. Or ~ .143% die with wood smoke being a potential contributor.

Or about 7.5% of all annual deaths have anything remotely related to wood smoke exposure.

So could your fireplace contribute to killing you? Well you have a ~ 92.5% chance everything else will first!

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#36
In reply to #33

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 9:35 AM

Creosote buildup is not a problem if you get your stack temperature up over 600 - 800 F a few ....

That's also the efficiency of your furnace. Correct damper controls can be a science, until you have it dialed in.

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#37

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 11:07 AM

In Vermont where I live woodstoves equipped with catalytic inserts are making a comeback. With a "cat" stove after an initial warmup in which the cat gets to 500 degrees F or higher you can shut the air supply way down and the cat will burn the smoke. Very long, even, clean burns are the result. The Woodstock Soapstone "Ideal Steal" stove has an EPA rating of 77% efficiency and 0.5 grams per hour emissions. There is almost no creosote build up. The minor downside is that the cat needs to be cleaned every 6 to 8 weeks. Many stove companies claim greater efficiency but they are not EPA rated stoves and thus not reliable ratings. And no, I don't work for Woodstock Soapstone.

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#41

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 7:35 PM

This thread is getting interesting. Recently here in Eastern Tennessee we have been having a bad smoke problem due to forest fires far away. The satellite photos show the fires in North Carolina, and the smoke persists for hundreds of miles! Until rain takes it down, it prevails. There is a burn ban for any outside fires on the whole geographic area, involving all the nearby states, Va, NC, etc.

I passed a few houses smoking from their chimneys, and saw plenty of smoke adding to the problem. Don't know if it was fireplaces or wood stoves, but you don't really notice smoking chimneys until it is a current news item.

It makes me even more desiring to have the best stove I can afford, and to operate it properly. Also, I only plan to use it for emergencies, or when the temp drops so low that my heat pump gives up and changes over to 'toaster mode'. That is reportedly expensive.

I'll try to include a pic of the cheapest stove, still EPA approved, though. If I can find a glass front one that is efficient and at a good price, all the better.

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#42
In reply to #41

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/27/2016 11:21 PM

That style would be my choice for simple reliable backup heat. Millions of them were used for the last century or better and are still in use today.

I've hear them referred to as cabin stoves or something like it. Bare basic but they will give you a warm meal if you need one.

BTW. I just got my mini boiler chimney stack roughed in to where it's usable and got it loaded with enough antifreeze and water to work . Even gave it heat up test with the big bertha torch and let it heat the floor in the workshed for a bit.

My sheds heatable and everything else I need to do with the system is indoor work so I'm ready for the storms this week!

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#55
In reply to #42

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 6:22 PM

I stopped by Northern Tool to look at the cabin stove. It was not assembled, so I had to bother them to empty it out and see inside. This unit is different from the original unit. The top no longer has openings, and the damper is tamper-proof. No inlet air control either, it's all engineered to burn at a clean rate until it's empty. No fire brick inside, the fire is set right on the inside floor of the unit. That means you can't get the ashes out until the unit has finished and cooled. Not a biggie for me, hopefully. I only plan to run it once a day, and clean it out the next morning.

The air path is from the fixed front door opening, opening down low, past the logs then up and into the secondary burn area above a baffle over the fire area. A tube carrying pre-heated air from the bottom of the unit has small holes above the fire area right near the inlet for the secondary burn. I presume that provides secondary burn oxygen. I'll have to check the manual to be sure of this, to see if it shows an air-path.

I don't think the original units had these baffles or air tubes. The lids on the top could be opened, and the damper and air inlet probably could be adjusted.

The manual does say to install a barometric damper if the unit has draw problems.

I still like this unit best, because it can handle logs longer than most all the others. The firebox is 27". Also, it's the cheapest. Too bad I can't see the fire, there's always a hole saw and a sheet of mica......

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#56
In reply to #55

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 7:03 PM

"I still like this unit best, because it can handle logs longer than most all the others. The firebox is 27". Also, it's the cheapest. Too bad I can't see the fire, there's always a hole saw and a sheet of mica......"

Yea that being able to handle that extra several inches of wood length makes a big difference in wood cutting and processing time. If you have never relied on a a smaller unit that takes 16 - 20" wood as your primary heat source you probably wont realize the time and effort savings but if you ever have you will come to appreciate 27" wood capacity pretty fast!

If the firebox is fair sized adding a firebrick floor and lower side shielding to it is easy enough and would likely help with the longevity of the metal in those areas.

As for the hole saw and mica windows, now you're talkin my language!

Just make sure you never breath the smoke or you're gonna die.

In fact try not to look at it either because it's plausibly linkable to seeing smoke with cataracts being everyone who has ever developed cataracts more than likely saw wood smoke at least once in their life thus proving a near 100% correlation between the two to justify claiming it being a 'contributing factor' in future eye related problems.

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#61
In reply to #56

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 9:22 AM

I like his idea, and your assessment. I laughed a while about seeing smoke being linked with cataracts. It reminds me of an old joke about cadillacs, but I cannot repeat it here.

Making wood pellets is energy intensive, but they burn so clean, one could easily burn cotton burrs (the part that holds the cotton before harvesting), and cotton stalks. Anyone who has ever smelled the smoke from a fire of piled up cotton burrs knows how bad a stink that can be. Pelletized, cotton woody parts and burrs present no issue, burn clean, and produce to disagreeable odor.

I believe (as Andy Germany pointed out) that here in America we use some paraffin wax while forcing wood meal through the pellet dies, and that is only a low percentage of the total material, but it keeps the dies much cooler. Using potato starch might also work about as well, however. The issue with crop waste is always whether or not the material can be cleaned sufficiently of silt and sand that absolutely destroys the dies that form the pellets.

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#64
In reply to #61

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 1:02 PM

At least you found the humor funny.

I see I got OT'ed so obviously someone who has cataracts and or fear of wood smoke didn't. Maybe wood smoke has a link to some people not having a sense of humor?

Speaking Of making wood pellets a buddy of mine is a big dreamer on how to make his life easier by making everything he does far more complicated than it needs to be for as much cost as possible and he has approached me many times about designing various machines for him to do so.

A machine that can eat a whole tree or anything with a high woody fiber content and turn it directly into pallets at the other end is one of the last ones he was dreaming about. I said it could be done but not on a financial budget he could ever come close to meeting in his life and not for one that would ever make his end product remotely cost effective enough to make money on either.

Just the math behind the on the go heating systems requirements in both the design and raw fuel burn numbers to dry down that much freshly ground woody mass, because you know it has to make at least 100 ton a day of course, to be able to turn it into a palletized material was nuts even if it burned its own raw processed wood stock for the heat source.

So yea, lets design and build a $1 - 1.5 million dollar rig so he can save 15 - 20 hours a year on not having to cut wood and stoke his worn out under sized over worked boiler, we rescued from a scrap pile and I repaired because it literally burned down once for its previous owner, as much as he does.

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#65
In reply to #64

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 3:27 PM

I still think the cotton crop residue has potential, if the bugs could ever be worked out of removing all the dirt. We have tub grinders in this part of the world that find work chugging away on various crop residues, cotton being no exception.

You are of course, 100% correct in your weighty assertions that it typically costs more than the profit potential justifies especially when logs are available that can be made to burn well.

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#66
In reply to #65

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 4:13 PM

I don't know what a tub grinder is, but shredding combustibles sounds good to me. I have wondered if the output of a chipper-shredder can be burned? It would have to be fed in gradually, like the pellets, I presume.

On this same vein, I did consider designing a compactor that would attach to a log splitter and compact twigs. I certainly see a lot of burnable material in the tree I dropped (wood rot, another thread). Disposing of the not-big-enough-for practical-firewood usually means burning it in the yard, a smoky procedure. I saw a machine that compacted wood chips for 2X4s (with glue and heat). A similar machine cramming twigs into a progressively smaller chamber might produce a continuous extrusion log size. A quick wrap with small wire, cut it to length, and voila, you got firewood. Pick the wire out of the ashes, easy peasy.

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#68
In reply to #66

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 4:33 PM

I would hate to see the shrapnel from around that fireplace if the wire broke before it stretched.

Why not just burn this all as chips in a circulating fluidized bed burner/boiler? Air preheat is a must, and so is at least a minimum of air re-circulation by induction.

Tub grinder: If you object to crass advertisements on CR4, please do not view.

tub grinder movie - also a crass advertisement

There are plenty of other manufacturers of tub grinders other than that presented in this short clip. The purpose is strictly educational.

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#75
In reply to #68

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/30/2016 3:07 AM

Now that is some grinder!!!

The output could be pelletised easily.....

Thanks for sharing!

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#78
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/30/2016 9:15 AM

I had a brain "fart" yesterday: Suppose the really sandy, dirty crop residues were merely routed through a tub grinder first, then through a series of gap spaced rollers (top row offset from bottom row) so that the material was required to undulate as it passed through the rollers.

The fines can be sieved off using a vibratory screen, then the fines separated (if so desired) by cyclone separator to recover the lightweight organic portion, and discard sand, silt, etc.

By passing the ground cotton stalks, burrs, through a double or triple set of rollers (with separation), the final ground product should have been cleaned sufficiently without any need for water (which also apparently ruins the pelleting dies)..

Final product: pelletized crop residue.

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#69
In reply to #66

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 7:44 PM

Yes chipped wood and yard debris burns very well. In most cases it can be handled and burned like coal or mixed with coal.

The down side is unlike coal it will not go through a closed tube auger well. It has to be transported in a U shaped open tube where it has clearance above the auger flighting to tumble a bit.

Theres a guy that used to live In Grand forks ND that built a big sawdust and wood chip fired boiler who gave me a tour and explanation if his system years ago. It worked very well but getting that stuff to feed was one of his biggest problems in the begining.

Without The open U shaped tube design it would pack into the augers so tight it would get seized up into a solid log with no way to clear it out other than literally burn it out. He said it drove him nuts for the first few years of trying to perfect a system that could feed sawdust and chips from a bin into his boiler like a normal coal stoker system would. If it was mixed about 50/50 by volume with coal it worked fine but once it got past that ratio it would start packing in at random.

As for burning it either it has to be fed top down by a drop in system where air comes up from the bottom and from over the top or it can be augered in with a bottom feed and burn top down but again it has to have air fed from underneath it or it just sits there and smolders.

Some years ago the local county road crews cut down and chipped several large trees along the road on our property line so I grabbed a bunch of that heavy chipped wood and tried running it in my boiler and as long as I had air coming up from the floor draft and air over ii from the door draft it burned very well.

I've pushed my buddy to get a good used commercial wood chipper rig and just chip all his assorted junk wood and burn that but the concept of having two air draft systems and a U shaped feeder auger 'just seems too complicated to work'. I think it's more of an excuse because it would require him to still have to go out and load his boiler himself plus a good used wood chipper rig is still a magnitude of order or two more than he can afford anyway.

Heck, I pushed him for years to just go buy cheap lignite coal from the Center ND coal mine loading facility for $25 - $30 a ton but since he lives in the NE corner of the state to go there and back with his dads gravel truck and pup trailer which could haul a good 15 -20 tons but it would take him a full day plus ~$150 in fuel and the upwards of $450 - $600 dollars and in the end he would still have to go and shovel it in the boiler anyways. All of which again is a good magnitude of order more time and money than he's willing to put forth.

That and it doesn't take and own a million dollar machine to do either which totally ruins the bragging rights of course.

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#45

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 9:43 AM

I lived in Yosemite valley in the late 1970's. I lived in a tent-cabin, I was an employee of the Yosemite Park & Curry Co. Every tent cabin had a Diesel fuel stove heater. These heaters had been in operation well before the 1940's, so apparently they were very durable. The setup was pretty simple: 1 large diesel fuel tank, a copper line from the tank to the stove, no electrical supply required. Easy to start: 1. Open fuel supply valve. 2. Pump primer. 3. Light burner. 4. As burner warms up, slowly open regulator valve.

Easy-peazy, no wood to cut, haul, store. Fill up diesel tank once a _____(?) The tank they had in my cabin tent area had a 50 gallon capacity.

I lived in the tent cabin well into the month of December, snow and ice outside (20*f) , (75*f) inside.

I looked on Google and saw a U.S. military heater stove ( manufactured in the US. / Not everything is made in China as some Wal Mart addicts would expect you to believe. ) For about $ 275.00 usd , it will burn diesel, jet fuel, gasoline, wood, coal.

All of these fuel sources are plentiful and cheap in Tennessee.

Here is a advertisement for a company that produces quality stoves / heaters for brick mortar / stick built & manufactured housing.

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#53

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 4:48 PM

Have you looked into pellet burners. Any wood that can be pelletized will work, and will burn clean in these.

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#54
In reply to #53

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/28/2016 4:52 PM

Anything with lignum (binder) can be pelletized.

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#58
In reply to #54

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 4:17 AM

Or certain types of flour, used in very small percentages, will bind wood well fpor pellet production. That is the method used here.

No petroleum products allowed, which I believe can be used in the USA. Here totally banned.

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#59
In reply to #58

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 4:24 AM

Yes, starches can be used as a binder also.

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#57
In reply to #53

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 4:14 AM

Absolutely true.

I wish that pellet machines were cheaper....(if I was younger that is!)

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#62
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 9:26 AM

Tall oil pitch, a waste product of paper making, could that be utilized to lubricate the dies and still meet European or American requirements? I know that tall oil pitch can be auto-oxidized under 60 psig air pressure with manganese catalyst to some synthetic fatty acid analogs, some fatty alcohols, peroxides, esters, etc. Maybe that also would improve lubricity to the dies. It is certainly an inexpensive material to add to the mix in low percentages.

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#60

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 8:29 AM

(ahem) Gentlemen, here's a dense and thorough article on wood pellet manufacturing impacts and how they stack up against cordwood, gas, uranium, and oil: http://www.sefs.washington.edu/research.corrim/pubs/articles/2012/FPJ_vol62_num04/06_FPJ-vol62-num04-2012.pdf

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#63
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 9:38 AM

Figure 2 in the article (a great one!) you cited, points out interesting facts related to CO2 across the spectrum of fuels compared. I have one question: why is the CO2 absorbed column for pellets shorter than for cord wood? For the life of me, I cannot understand that, except if releasing 1MJ of heat required far less pellet weight than cord wood weight, is that it?

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#67
In reply to #60

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 4:19 PM

Thanks.

I will take some time to assimilate it all, but it appears very promising.....but of course, some here will either not bother to read it, or simply attempt to make fun of it as it shows a well studied, real world, study!!

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#70
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 8:39 PM

Given the amount of crap science we all get bombarded with every single day, and how many of those studies they claimed were 100% accurate and real eventually were proven to be nothing but inaccurate and highly skewed crap science aimed to back someones agenda against something they didn't like, there's a reason most people with any degree of scientific and engineering background don't put much faith into any mass scare type study proclamations that claim something common that we have been exposed or even depended on to all our lies is now some new and horrible source of slow lingering death if we are exposed to at any level no matter how small.

For example, right now there are some who think we should be terrified of the dangers of cow farts and they have their studies to back up why they claim they are right and that anyone who doesn't believe them is a closed minded idiotic fool who can't see the reality that's around them

Cow farts will kill us all and studies confirm it so it has to be true.

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#71

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 9:29 PM

Cow farts #1

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#72

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 9:32 PM

Cow farts #2

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#73

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 9:35 PM

Cow farts #3

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#76
In reply to #73

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/30/2016 3:43 AM

I liked the pictures, thanks.

Over here, there have been "gas" systems for some years which ferment the Manure and end up with pressurised gas, partly to keep it out of the atmosphere and partly because they are making good money at it.

Once the gas has been released and collected from the manure, the solid rest is a great manure and gets treated, packaged and sold off.

Naturally, its doing nothing to collect the "farts" that have apparently scared some Americans, but the sheer amounts of methane released into the atmosphere each day are being dramatically reduced.

As far as I am aware, any and all animal and human waste can be used in these modern gas generator systems, you see them all over Germany nowadays and more are being built all the time. The process has been improved dramatically as well as the gas collection systems.

Though I could not find any pictures of exactly the systems here, this picture is somewhat similar that I have stolen off the internet:-

There are a few papers here going back some years about Bio-gas:-

https://scholar.google.de/scholar?q=germany+methane+production+cow+manure&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi63pCahdDQAhWBNxQKHcHXCJ4QgQMIGDAA

You can also read the following in an interesting article:-

So besides the recycling of organic matter especially the use of methane as an energy source of a CO2 -neutral process reduces the consumption of fossil fuels like coal, crude oil or natural gas and is said to damp the greenhouse effect.

Here:-

http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/import/71505_8Anaerobic_digestion_in_Germany.pdf

And you can read an excellent Wiki article which contains the fact that Germany has more Biogas stations than any other EU nation:-

Germany is Europe's biggest biogas producer and the market leader in biogas technology. In 2010 there were 5,905 biogas plants operating throughout the country: Lower Saxony, Bavaria, and the eastern federal states are the main regions........Biogas is considered to be a renewable resource because its production-and-use cycle is continuous, and it generates no net carbon dioxide.

Here:-

Biogas

Methane has been known as a gas to avoid having in the atmosphere for a great many years, now something is being done to achieve that, though we have a long way to go still!!

Having found ways to collect it and sell the products as a neutral energy source is of course a huge plus, as is the sale of the solid rest as manure!!

Anyone thinking that is is a joke when talking about cow farts, is really not showing any deep understanding of the problems we could be looking at in the future....But we have always had stupid people around, so its nothing new really.

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#77
In reply to #76

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/30/2016 9:09 AM

Well then, you are not the only gas bag in Germany!

Good post. I am aware that a lot of dairy States in the MidWest are starting to use gas bags to collect useful heating fuel in the dairy. Other states are just sending gas bags to Washington, D.C. where they can be fully appreciated.

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#79
In reply to #73

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/30/2016 11:42 AM

Ohh some nasty Hydrogen Sulfide. I knew it!!! I am starting to believe the conspiracy theorist that the americans are funding the terrorist. Oh my, now they're training some cows!

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#80
In reply to #79

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/30/2016 4:57 PM

Not even close. Cows and cow manure emits methane.

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#89
In reply to #80

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/05/2016 10:18 PM

Maybe that guy sniff out the HS gases for good. Well, what can I say.

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#92
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/12/2016 2:07 PM

Pretty much, if you said nothing, then the world would be clueless about your mental state.

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#81
In reply to #73

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/30/2016 8:58 PM

Leave it to California to combat this.

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#82
In reply to #81

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/01/2016 10:29 PM

The article says, Livestock are responsible for 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions. What it doesn't say is how much of that 14.5% can be attributed to California dairy cows and or California livestock. Is there a list indicating which states or countries produce the highest levels of methane versus the States or countries that produce the lowest levels ? When the percentage was quoted by a UN representative, it appears that 14.5% is a figure world wide. First we need to know how much methane gas is contributed by California, then a valid argument can be given to how to gain support for control of these gasses from the remaining sources of the percentages.

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#83
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/01/2016 10:37 PM

If there research available for how much methane a cow produces, then you just figure in the cow numbers. Maybe the

at 14.5% is just a relative number. Or maybe that's just what is produce, no matter what proportion.

I could have used a better, more detailed link.

thing about CA, dairy, or farming in general, brings in billions for the state.

Problem with the far liberal left CA is, is that it will Cut off the nose to spite the face

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#74

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

11/29/2016 10:10 PM

Yep. If you're alive everything has the potential to kill you and at some point it will all have succeeded in contributing to doing it.

Life is 100% fatal. There's no way out so live while you have the capacity to enjoy doing so. No one ever died wishing they spent more of their life time worrying about what could have killed them and how and who else they could have convinced to be afraid of living their lives too.

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#84

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/02/2016 2:51 PM

When I was in Fairbanks years ago I purchased an Ashley airtight which gave me excellent service, here in Colorado I picked up a Suburban brand built along the same lines for $300 and spent $45 replacing the internal fire tiles....the advantage to this type of wood stove is the open flue design with automatic draft regulation... I get 6-8 hours burn and they seem to be the most efficient of the types I've used over the last 60 years. I'd check around for a dealer that carries both new and used units and stocks repair parts....

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#85
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/02/2016 2:54 PM

We had (2) Ashley's wood stoves, They weren't too heavily built (That's why my dad bought (2) of them back in the 70's) but it lasted over 12-15 years.

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#86
In reply to #85

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/02/2016 3:04 PM

Just checked 'Tractor Supply' they list an Ashley Coal Stove Circulator for $879, and it appears to be the same as the two I mentioned earlier... 117000BTU output / heat 2000 sqft.

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#87

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/05/2016 8:33 PM

Well, I ordered the Ashley Logwood stove, model 2469 E, the 'cabin stove'. I got a super deal from Northern Tool at $300 after taxes. I'll pick it up in a week or so, it's back-ordered. The salesman said 10 other people ordered one, too, so I feel more confident on a good choice.

My chimney inspector comes Thursday, to document my chimney's condition for the insurance company. Like I said, it is clean as a whistle, no visible cracks. I'm confident it will pass. (crosses fingers).

I talked to another salesman about them, he agreed with me that burning the fire directly on the floor of the stove may result in a log smothered in ashes and not burning properly. We'll see if a grate is necessary. It would allow for shoveling ashes from under it to expose the logs to all-around airflow. I'll try to get as much input from other users as possible, by Googling the model for reviews.

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#88
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Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/05/2016 9:19 PM

The Ashley can throw off a lot of heat. Make sure it's installed correctly... so you don't burn down your house.

on ours my dad would open the damper and forget about it. It got dam hot. Sheet stall warped.

always keep a little ash on the floor of the stove... if it doesn't now have fire brick.

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#90
In reply to #87

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/06/2016 1:59 PM

The models I mentioned have cast shaker grates and a self regulating draft, if you clean out the ashes daily so they don't build up under the grates, they last forever, and the thermostatically controlled draft means you can stoke it full and walk away...I used to stoke mine at 10 in the eve and it would keep an even temp until 6 in the morning, I fed it oak scrap about every 8 hours.

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#91
In reply to #87

Re: What Wood Stove to Buy?

12/06/2016 2:36 PM

My homemade unit did not have a grate. After using the first time I added one which made it work much better.

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