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Power-User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 130

LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/28/2010 4:49 AM

Dear All,

I plan to build an OVEN with the tunnel dimension 80 feet (L) x 25 feet (W) x 8 feet (H) i need Working temperature 200 deg C, maximum 250 deg C and Heat up time (to 200 deg C) 15-20 minutes. how many burner required and what is the capacity of each burners.

Please advise how to calculate the burner size and if i use electrical heater then what is Kw needed .

Thank you and Best Regards

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Guru

Join Date: May 2010
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#1

Re: LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/28/2010 10:44 AM

You need to know the level of insulation -- then the calulations are pretty simple. However, for an oven this large, my recommendation would be to hire an engineer -- there are many details to be worked out.

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Active Contributor

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Posts: 24
#7
In reply to #1

Re: LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/29/2010 9:16 AM

I agree with Moronic Bumble:

Hire an engineer or contract with a manufacturer experienced in the design and construction of industrial ovens and drying systems.

There are many variables and details that must be discused and worked out. Desired function, product being handled, method of handling, Construction materials, insulation, refractory materials, nature of manufacturing process, materials used in the process, materials being heated, (possibly pollution control measures), heating method (direct or in-direct), fuel and burner efficiency, burner and parts availability (the best burner in the world is useless if it breaks and can't be fixed in a timely manner), required degree and accuracy of temperature control, allowable temperature variance along length of oven, required cool-down time (I used to work with vacuum ovens at 1400 degrees C where we used nitrogen to cool the oven interiors before opening) allowable contaminant levels (how clean must your process be kept), other design constraints, (weight, structural constraints, architectural limits, regulatory requirements) cost, budget, schedule . . . The list goes on.

The advice you can get from CR4 is good, but there are instances where a detailed analysis of your needs may be better.

May you have good fortune and success.

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Guru
Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member Engineering Fields - Piping Design Engineering - New Member

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#2

Re: LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/28/2010 11:13 AM

You should account for these items:

1. Warming up the air in the oven initially. (Volume x density x specific heat of air.)

2. Heat escape through the tunnel envelope (Area x temperature difference รท R value of insulation.)

3. Heat added to product. (Temperature rise x product weight x specific heat.)

4. Air exchange through openings. (There is a formula like K x W x H1.5 x TD.)

5. Warming up of oven structure and conveying equipment.

The units given are mixed; constants used in the formulas will depend on the units chosen.

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Power-User

Join Date: Apr 2010
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#4
In reply to #2

Re: LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/28/2010 11:12 PM

I went to a seminar where fast frozen foods were talked about a few days ago. The presenter pointed out that the heat gain associated with the conveying equipment was underestimated in a job he had something to do with and because of that someone lost money.

I take this to be the same in the case of ovens and heat loss.

Accordingly, although rack loading equipment is complicated and troublesome, the up side is that there is not a continuous heat load/heat loss to the thermal process.

Design accordingly.

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Guru
Engineering Fields - Instrumentation Engineering - New Member

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#3

Re: LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/28/2010 11:57 AM

Sounds like you might be going into the powder coat business.

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Guru

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#5

Re: LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/28/2010 11:58 PM

you are the designer. you have not mentioned if travelling/batch type? what are you drying? how you have put in recirculation? how many chamber/s? you have to decide.

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Power-User

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#6

Re: LP Gas Burner Capacity

10/29/2010 8:10 AM

To heat up the furnace first time, get the values and use the following formula:

(80x25x8)*(1/35.3)* (density of air in Kg/M3)x(Specific heat of air in kcals/kg/deg.C) x(200 - room temp) = (Calorific value of LPG in kcals/M3)*(flow rate of gas in M3/min.) *(time in minutes).

The only unknown - Flow rate of LPG can be determined.

The flow rate of LPG = Capacity of each burner x no. of burners

Capacity of each burner and no. of burners can be decided from available burners in market.

To get the value in KW, use the relation 1 KW = 860 Kcals/hr.

To maintain the temp. you need much less heat input depending on insulation. To minimize the losses use insulation such as mineral wool or glass wool.

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