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Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 3:49 AM

Dear all,

Do we have to take care of the phase and neutral as we do with positive and negative of DC? The supply is 230 V P-N, 60 Hz. I have an airconditioner. I don't know the internal wiring of AC. Can I connect it to the switch without giving regards to phase or neutral or do I have to checkout the internal wiring of AC to connect phase to one wire and neutral to the other?

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#1

Re: Plugging in an Air conditioner!

05/06/2014 4:55 AM

my advice is, find a professional electrician to do the plugging for you

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Plugging in an Air conditioner!

05/06/2014 5:20 AM

The electricain has already done it. I just wanted to clear my doubt. :)

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#3
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Re: Plugging in an Air conditioner!

05/06/2014 6:54 AM

Case 1: The unit is working. What is the question, if any?

Case 2: The unit is not working. Is there a question sensibly directed to that case?

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#5
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Re: Plugging in an Air conditioner!

05/06/2014 8:44 AM

I think there are some units whose neutrals are attached to the outer bodya and to the ground. In such case, I think we would have to take care of phase and neutral. Any advice??

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#14
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Re: Plugging in an Air conditioner!

05/07/2014 9:14 AM

When installing 220v appliances, it is common for the neutral to be connected to the ground. BUT, the power lead-in to the appliance MUST have it's own breaker and the neutral MUST be grounded at the breaker box.

Also, Both of the breakers must be tied together so that if one hot breaks, the other breaks as well.

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#4
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Re: Plugging in an Air conditioner!

05/06/2014 8:39 AM

And the reason the electrician that installed it cannot be asked is what, please?

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#6

Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 10:41 AM

heres a clue...........its alternating!

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#7
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 10:47 AM

:D

Okay. Let me add further. When we draw a simple AC sigle phase circuit, we don't assign polarities since the nature is alternating. i.e. for half cycle, one of the wire serves as phase while the other serves as a return(neutral). Same thing happens in the second half cylce. So why do we have a fixed neutral in our homes? Doesn't the neutral act as a phase and phase as neutral for the half of the cycle?

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#8
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 11:14 AM
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#12
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 11:46 PM

No it does NOT! Just because the voltage goes from a peak, through zero and back to a peak does not mean there is a return (or ground) at the neutral point. That being said, there IS a fixed neutral in your home. That neutral should be, (but sometimes fails to be a "ground" or "earth".) Please, please, please take a course in electricity. It is surprisingly easy to understand if you can get a good instructor to tutor you. You won't get it here...though will get some good attempts. It is a BIG subject, and hard to cover briefly.

The biggest problem with electricity, especially basic electricity like this is the terminology. It is easy to get confused between a contactor or a relay, a prime mover and a motor, or floating or fixed grounds, electrical neutrals, and mathematical values such as RMS,(root mean square) Average, and even biased electricity. For instance, if your black wire is fixed to neutral, your white wire voltage will swing to values which are harder to calculate. If this concept means nothing to you, then, again, please take a course.

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#13
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/07/2014 4:53 AM

Neutral will (or better said SHOULD) be linked to ground for safety reasons. It should not be linked twice or loops will be formed.

Even in the same country, there may be at least two possible LEGAL ways to do the link. In rural areas the link might need to be made at the house or building, in towns, it may be done at the substation. I cannot say where it is done where you are.....You must look at the code where you are to be certain.

The reason for connecting neutral and ground is so that the frame of any device is grounded, but if a fault occurs and the phase makes contact or even partial contact with the frame, current will flow and hopefully safety devices will drop the power.....Simple fuses or CBs cannot be relied on to safeguard people fully as the current drawn may be less than enough to blow the fuse/operate the CBs. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!

Special devices that monitor the current flowing via the phase and neutral, which normally should be identical. If some current flows via the ground instead, the device will simply drop off the power before a known killing value of current (for a healthy person) flows. It still hurts, tested accidentally many years ago..... Its still far better than fuses.....

These devices are usually not designed to safeguard the device from over current, only personal getting a shock, so normal fuses/CBs may also be needed.

Talk to an expert.

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#20
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/08/2014 11:46 PM

In a normal house, there are two sides to the voltage supply. Left and right. You can see this plainly on the circuit breaker panel which are, set up as left and right.

cleverly enough, the breakers are internally connected so that if you count from the top down, every second breaker is right and every second breaker is left. This is for ease of running wires.

When the voltage rises on the left side, it is falling on the right side. They are "out of phase". The neutral (middle point) should be grounded. When we deliver the voltage with wires, one wire is attached to the middle, neutral point. The other wire's voltage will rise and fall in the familiar alternating pattern. Each side is discrete...which means that a lamp or small load is normally delivered to one side only. The connection is from hot to neutral. Your air condititioner may be hooked up like a lamp and use only one side of the circuit breaker panel. A standard three prong plug would be used in this case.

Your air conditioner may be hooked up differently than, say, a single light bulb. Instead of 120 volts, it may be "rated" as 240 volts. In this case, the wires are connected differently, directly from left to right instead of from one side to neutral. This is common with clothes dryers and electric stoves. In the US and Canada, a different plug is used for 240 volt systems.

I "think" I have answered your question. What do other people think, did I finally focus on his problem, or am I leaving way to much out?

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#21
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/09/2014 12:04 AM

That's a good description of most American systems, if you add that many stoves use both "hot" phases, plus the neutral, plus ground (earth) (total 4 wires).

Around the world, though, there are several types of grounding systems, such as 3-wire, or polarized-plug 2-wire; and various possibilities for appliance frames to be grounded or not, attached to neutral or not, or double-insulated. The OP didn't give his location, which is often vital for answering such questions. Nor did he say whether it was single-phase center tap, or three-phase, or where grounded. The very lack of these details means that he might not understand any answers given, no matter how good.

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#22
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/09/2014 2:43 AM

Very true. I think the only way the original question makes sense is if the OP was trying to incorporate a generator into his standard 2 phase system. Say, during power outages.

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#23
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/11/2014 1:23 AM

Thanks!

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#24
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/14/2014 8:12 AM

Remember, that comment was based on North American Systems. Better people than I know how things work in the Kingdom. I can't believe it would be much different in basic design, but standards of voltages seem to be different country by country. Like a pipe carrying water to a city...sometimes it is a little higher pressure, sometimes a little lower, but you still need a "pipe".

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#9

Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 3:47 PM

Can I connect it to the switch without giving regards to phase or neutral

I would strongly advise you not to touch the wiring. Get an electrician to do it for you.

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#10

Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 8:10 PM

YES. In alternating current wiring, the neutral is connected to ground at some point. The phase has alternating voltage, in your case, between +/- 325 volts. If the neutral is connected internally to the frame of the air conditioner, connecting it backwards would be very dangerous.

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#11

Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/06/2014 11:06 PM

An Air Conditioner is , as to say "plug and play", so do not worry .

Always talking about WINDOW and or SPLIT system .

I have been working on such device since 1965 . Maybe about 2500 ocurrency.

Never , by the never in my life , I had seen a NEUTRAL WIRE conected to ground , inside such device.

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#15

Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/07/2014 10:37 PM

smi_1989,

I'm curious as to where you are that has 230V phase to neutral AND 60Hz.

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#16
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/07/2014 10:50 PM
  1. Antigua y Barbuda230 V60 Hz

  2. San Cristóbal y Nieves230 V60 Hz

  3. from http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricidad.htm#voltage_table
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#17
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/08/2014 12:33 AM

You have the possible answer from someone else.

I believe that the reasons being that the places that need such a voltage/frequency, buy their equipment from the USA, but don't install the "central" Neutral/ground leg that the USA uses at the 110-120v middle point.

They simply "declare" one end of the single 230v phase as being Neutral/ground and connect it as such.

Most good well designed equipment can use either 50 or 60 Hz.

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#18
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/08/2014 8:14 AM

In Saudi Arabia, they have 230/400 V, 60 hz system.

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#19
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Re: Plugging in an Air Conditioner!

05/08/2014 2:01 PM

Also very heavily involved with the USA with regard to technology.....

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