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Anonymous Poster

Lifting Hooks

02/09/2010 12:44 PM

Hi,

I am designing a hook for a lifting mechanism. It has to lift about 40 tons of weight.

With a rough estimation, the hook is about 16" tall, 14" wide and 5" thick.

What kind of material is best suitable for this application? What kind of heat treatment precess can be used so that the hook will not be too brittle?

Besides, forge or cast? which way is better?

Thanks and regards,

Teng

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Guru
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#1

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/09/2010 3:04 PM

does it have to be a hook.

I wrote an excel program for lifting lugs on equipment, but have also used that when I design an overhead portable crane. I used ASME formulas.

p911

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#3
In reply to #1

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/09/2010 4:33 PM

Would you please send me your formula?

chinpunt@shaw.ca

Thanks

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/09/2010 4:50 PM

sure.....but you really should not post your email here. next time sent a message though CR4

For a disclaimer. I do not know if all of this is the latest.

All what this program does is to help assist, it is still up to you to verify.

good luck

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#2

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/09/2010 3:47 PM

Although casting has more flexibility with regard to design, forging would be my choice due to superior mechanical properties (i.e. yield and ductility). Cast components can also have discontinuities such as porosity, hot tearing, inclusions, and cold shuts to name a few. Even if these defects are present in the ingot or billet they can be eliminated or minimized with forging.

Heat treating to relieve residual stress from the forging process would be beneficial and final annealing to restore the materials original ductility.

For material you will need high strength with enough ductility to yield before losing the ability to carry the design load at ambient operating temperature. Unless a corrosive environment is a concern, there is an array of carbon steels that should be suitable (see American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), Section 1.

Whatever material or fabrication method: the hook will require load testing a twice it rated load, (80 tons). Then inspected: visual, magnetic particle, and/or dye penetrate. The governing standard is ASME B30.10, but be sure to look at OSHA and any state codes that may be applicable.

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#5

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/10/2010 3:05 AM

With fear of stating the obvious, Make sure the load is designed to be lifted at the points you are looking to attack to without distorting / failing.

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/10/2010 9:43 AM

often overlooked

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#7

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/10/2010 11:12 AM

It sounds like you are trying to re-invent the wheel. There are companies out there that manufacture hooks of all capacities. The engineering has already been done and certified. It will cost you more to do it all yourself. 40 tons is nothing to fool with by someone who doesn't understand the metallurgy and design.

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#8
In reply to #7

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/10/2010 11:31 AM

Well put. Further, the dimensions given are far larger than required for a 40 ton hook. Far better to simply buy the appropriate hook.

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#9

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/13/2010 5:46 AM

Hooks are forged from En-3A steel (British Std.). They are normalised after forging. Cast hook I have never heard of. There is proper grain flow in forged hooks.

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#10

Re: Lifting Hooks

02/04/2013 11:12 AM

Forged Steel to be used for the Hook. Tensile Strength to be about 52 Kg/MM^2. Design to be approved by the Statutory Authority.

DHAYANANDHAN.S

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