Previous in Forum: Wax Coating on Lead Bullets   Next in Forum: Is Space Empty?
Close
Close
Close
70 comments
Associate

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 39
Good Answers: 1

Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 1:20 AM

Olga and I do quite a bit of back-country camping in our Teardrop Trailer. A lot of the traveling is on dry, very dusty roads. Dust get into everything. The teardrops door seals seem to be very tight but the dust being kicked up from our tow vehicle always seems to make its way inside the trailer. So, I'm trying to come up with a way to 'pressurize' the inside of the trailer. My thinking is any microscopic holes or cracks that would allow the dust to enter would come up against a constant air flow pushing outward. A low pressure, high volume blower might work. It would have to be a 12 VDC blower that I could switch on or off through the 7 pin electrical connector between the tow vehicle and the trailer from inside the tow vehicle. The air intake would have to be filtered in some way so I wouldn't be pulling the dust into the trailer. Maybe some kind of off road type of air filter used on dune buggys or the like. My question is this. What would be an ideal 12 VDC blower to use? Where would the best place be to mount the intake? Underneath? On top? In front or back? Here is a photo of the trailer showing its "aerodynamic" design. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Ron

__________________
'Consider it all entertainment'
Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16510
Good Answers: 668
#1

Re: Keeping the dust out.

02/04/2010 4:14 AM

Funky trailer, I bet that's cosy.
Can't think of anything very clever, vents usually cause air to be drawn out.
Maybe you need to make a model and stick in in a wind tunnel to see the high/low pressure points, then make a big vent at a high pressure point with a filter so clean air can get in.
In a nutshell, make it easier for the clean air to get in than it is for the dirty air.
here in the UK I have the oposite problem...I have 1/4" of water in the boot (trunk) of my Nissan Micra getting in from somwhere...maybe I could fill it right up and keep fish in there for snacking on.
Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#2

Re: Keeping the dust out.

02/04/2010 8:49 AM

My thought is you'd want to mount the intake as far away from the car's exhaust as possible. No sense pumping your comfy little love-nest full of noxious exhaust odors or worse...carbon monoxide.

I'm not particuarlly recommending it, but one place to start might be Grainger. They sell a variety of small DC blowers which might work (part #3FRG5 is the sort of thing I'm thinking of). One thing to keep in mind no matter what blower you choose is that it will be critical to well filter its air intake (and keep that filter clean). Otherwise your current incidental dust problem will pale in comparision to the thick coating you'll have!

And Del...

Don't ride those poor little fishies around in your boot. They'll get car sick.

Besides, how did a cat get a driver's liscense anyway? I thought Toonces was the only cat who can drive a car.

http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/autopia/toonces2.jpg

Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 15446
Good Answers: 953
#3

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 11:13 AM

Our guest has a good point here. I suspect that the leading high air pressure areas around your trailer will be precisely where your vehicle's exhaust will be dumping. Particularly since your tow vehicle is taller than your trailer. You might consider an air scoop on the top of your trailer. Regardless of where you penetrate the trailer, you will have to consider not just dust entering but all forms of foul weather possibly entering.

I remember a plumbing friend of mine that added a three inch diameter PVC T fitting to the top back part of his work van. This T was aligned so that the slip-steam would flow through the top of the T and Bernoulli provided a pressure drop that vented all of the nasty fumes from the last job out of the van. He did briefly experiment with this by first blocking the front of the T off, but not enough vacuum was developed to save his nose. When he tried blocking the back of the T (making a scoop) the air being blown in while driving did precisely what he didn't want, but you do.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
2
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering -

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1651
Good Answers: 71
#4

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 12:05 PM

I would say keep it simple. Use a vacuum. If you can get a high flow 12 volt version go for it, if not use an A/C converter to run a small shop vac. If one isn't enough, try 2.

Set the vacuum up where the inlet (hose on shop vac is easiest) is sticking out somewhere dry and leave the vacuum unit strapped to a chair or the floor, it's exhaust will be filtered clean air pressurizing your trailer.

Just don't overload your wiring. It might be advisable to set up an auxialary wire to run the vacuum on its own fuse circuit.

Drew

__________________
Question: What is going on with the American's Government? Response: Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 15446
Good Answers: 953
#5
In reply to #4

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 12:44 PM

Simple? What is more simple than an unpowered hole with piping that directs the airflow around the trailer to be useful. My approach don't need no stinking electricity. Don't need no stinking badges either.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering -

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1651
Good Answers: 71
#6
In reply to #5

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 12:55 PM

True...but will you be travelling fast enough down a dirt road to make a filter restricted vent pressurize the cabin?

Simple, and effective. Gotta love a vacuum (even if nature abhors it).

You do need to be sure not to suck up exhaust fumes.

Drew

__________________
Question: What is going on with the American's Government? Response: Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 5737
Good Answers: 309
#27
In reply to #4

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 3:26 AM

And if it doesn't work, he's got a vacuum cleaner to suck up the dust.

__________________
We are alone in the universe, or, we are not. Either way it's incredible... Adapted from R. Buckminster Fuller/Arthur C. Clarke
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering -

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1651
Good Answers: 71
#36
In reply to #27

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 11:47 AM

Exactly!!!

Besides, you will need a vacuum for dirt tracked in anyway. As for how long it will last running, I would spend more on a higher quality unit so I didn't have to worry about it wearing out too quickly.

I know in a small travel trailer space is at a premium, but if you are set upon building a unit with a 12 volt motor you could look into the dust collection systems used in the woodworking industry.

Drew

__________________
Question: What is going on with the American's Government? Response: Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42369
Good Answers: 1683
#7

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 1:33 PM

OK,

This may sound radical, but why not plumb the exhaust into the trailer and use that as your positive pressure.

The vehicle looks to be new and they don't pollute they way my '55 Chevy did, so think it over.

I assume no one rides back there when you are travelling.

You can call me crazy.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16510
Good Answers: 668
#8
In reply to #7

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 1:58 PM

...you're crazy.
Del
(Filling the trailer with water would keep the dust out too)

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42369
Good Answers: 1683
#9
In reply to #8

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 2:15 PM

OK. Just thinking outside the box.

"(Filling the trailer with water would keep the dust out too)" I thought about that first, but fuel mileage would be the pits.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Anonymous Poster
#12
In reply to #9

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 2:45 PM

OK. Just thinking outside the box.

But in doing so you're turning that box into a coffin.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 15446
Good Answers: 953
#10
In reply to #7

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 2:17 PM

I don't think even Dr. Kevorkian would like this idea.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 39
Good Answers: 1
#11
In reply to #7

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 2:32 PM

Well....hmmm....I think that the residual gasses would probably make it so I wouldn't care if there was dust inside. That's because I would be either high or dead....

__________________
'Consider it all entertainment'
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42369
Good Answers: 1683
#14
In reply to #11

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 3:53 PM

No. No. No. You've gotta air it out before you turn in for the night. Surely you don't let people ride back there when you're driving down the dirt roads.

Never mind. It was a dumb idea from the start.

I suppose duct tape is out, too.

Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 39
Good Answers: 1
#15
In reply to #14

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 4:56 PM

I've actually tried duct tape. We were driving on the "Discover Oregon Trail" that's an off road trip that spans 400+ miles diagonally across the State of Oregon, all on dirt, gravel, rutty, forest service roads. The dust was terrible so I firmly duct taped around the side door, the galley door and (closed) roof vent. The trailers interior still had a coating of very fine, powdered sugar like dust....everywhere. I've looked for possible inlets elsewhere such as fender wells, the floor etc. Everything appears to be sealed tight. That's why I'm going for the pressurized cabin idea.

__________________
'Consider it all entertainment'
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42369
Good Answers: 1683
#16
In reply to #15

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 5:09 PM

Picture, if you will, a small box on the front of your trailer just large enough for the 12V fan. From this box protrudes the snorkel, a 1-2 inch dia. vertical tube that terminates in clean air negating the need for a filter, perhaps. Of course the tube would be removable if needed. And reversing the fan gives you a vent when camped. In camp, it'd make a cool flag pole, too.

Hey, it's better than CO.

Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7498
Good Answers: 96
#26
In reply to #7

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 2:51 AM

Is this a plug for Hydrogen fuel system too?

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42369
Good Answers: 1683
#34
In reply to #26

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 9:55 AM

I'm at a loss as to how you could possible make such a connection.

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#13

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 2:59 PM

Try to keep the trailer cool before you take a country tour.

Just vent it, so it´s coolder than the outside temp. because if it´s hot when you start the triler will be colder when you drive an then the air will suck in the trailer.

Just a guess, from my side

Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering -

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1651
Good Answers: 71
#17

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 5:17 PM

What? Nobody likes my idea of a vacuum cleaner? It already has built in filtration that you can change readily, they have 12 volt versions.

I thought it was perfect! Here is one that is a blower too so you can use it to fill inflatable beds or water toys.

Drew

__________________
Question: What is going on with the American's Government? Response: Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 42369
Good Answers: 1683
#18
In reply to #17

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 5:37 PM

" Nobody likes my idea of a vacuum cleaner?" Too practical. No elegance. Sorry.

Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering -

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1651
Good Answers: 71
#19
In reply to #18

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 6:04 PM

There is elegance in simplicity!

Drew

__________________
Question: What is going on with the American's Government? Response: Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 15446
Good Answers: 953
#20
In reply to #19

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 6:16 PM

Yes, there is elegance in simplicity. But ultimately it's up to the OP what system will use a new or existing hole in this trailer. I do wonder though about the service lifetime of a wet/dry vacuum. Your idea will push more air than any proposed other approach and does already have a dust catcher. Without knowing how much leakage happens its hard to say which approach will be needed or is efficient.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering -

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1651
Good Answers: 71
#21
In reply to #20

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 6:55 PM

Pretty easy test for it though. Put an exhaust vent and measure outlet when vacuum is at full blast. A simple flapper on the exhaust will show if there is much pressure when vac is on. I would assume you won't see much, the real test will be driving down a dusty road to see if dust accumulates.

Drew

__________________
Question: What is going on with the American's Government? Response: Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: I'm outa here
Posts: 1924
Good Answers: 196
#22
In reply to #17

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 11:04 PM

I love the western deserts and don't spend enough time out there. I know what it's like. That Toyota pickup in my picture is my one person desert camper. And yes, dust does get into it around the tailgate mostly.

Drew's 12volt vacuum cleaner looks neat. But don't be too surprised if its life is only a few hours especially in hot continuous duty operating conditions.

A lot of the older (like 1960's and 70's large sedans) have fairly large heater blowers. You'll probably have to butcher the heater to come up with a usable outer scroll housing. This would give you more air flow but less pressure than the vacuum cleaner.

Next time you're out on a dirt road with your wife or someone else have them drop you off at roadside in a place where you can get back a hundred feet or so with your camera. Have them drive your rig (with the trailer) up the road, turn around and drive past you while you photograph the dust dtreem theat the car-trailer combo kicks up. That will likely tell you the cleanest place to put an air intake for positive pressure or bernoulli effect cooling. If an intake a large filter that you can easily clean like the air filters the serious off-road guys use on their engines might work. Another trick is to tape pieces of yarn to the front of the trailer so one of you can watch the airflow in that area while the other is driving at various speeds.

I do like the idea of duct tape. But that can get to be a pain after a while, especially if you like to use the trailer for lunchtime rest stops.

Another thought (if you're a crackpot tinkerer like me) is that you may look into building a small VAWT (vertical axis wind turbine) and generator to mount on the top front of the trailer and generate 12 volts needed to charge the battery that drives the inside fan motor. That same fan placed over the sleeping area can provide comfortable air flow on those warm desert evenings before the inside of the trailer, especially the bedding, cools down from the day's heat.

Ed Weldon

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 579
Good Answers: 61
#35
In reply to #17

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 10:30 AM

The vacuum cleaner motor is cooled by the air flow. Unless there are significant leaks in the trailer, flow will be significantly reduced. Also, it is designed for intermittent, not continuous, duty. Both factors will lead to premature failure.

__________________
Experience: The knowledge you gain just AFTER you needed it.
Register to Reply
3
Power-User
Hobbies - HAM Radio - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 252
Good Answers: 5
#23

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/04/2010 11:21 PM

You have already proven that the door is not the problem with your tape experiment.

I suggest you park in a windless area or find a garage where you can get it inside away from air currents. Then pull a vacuum on the trailer and look for the leaks with an incense stick or something. If you are nervous about fire, just use an old squeeze bottle with some baby powder in it. Use a vacuum cleaner hose through a cardboard door cover taped in place and go along the edges and underside looking for places where the smoke/powder gets drawn into the trailer. I suspect you will find leaks associated with wiring, gas or other penetrations of the body or floor and the seams where the floor joins the sides.

When you find the problem areas, just seal with caulking or tape and go over it again. When you can't find any more leaks, take a trip down a dusty road and see if the dust stays out. I will be surprised if you don't find significant leaks where wiring and other penetrations of the enclosure occur.

I have a Coleman pop-up and had similar problems. There is significant dust accumulation under the seat where the water tank and battery are located. Yep! There are places where one can see light around the water and electric lines.

Have FUN!
TT3

__________________
If the software can detect, compensate, avoid, or correct an anomalous condition in the system, it is, by definition, a software problem-regardless of the root cause. In the long run, for most classes of problems, it is cheaper to fix it in the SW
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 3)
Guru
Hobbies - HAM Radio - New Member United Kingdom - Big Ben - New Member Fans of Old Computers - Altair 8800 - New Member Canada - Member - New Member

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3968
Good Answers: 119
#24
In reply to #23

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 12:31 AM

Get a vacuum cleaner and use it to slightly pressurize the closed trailer. Use a length of hose to give you isolation.

Then get a water bottle with a little foamy making dish soap in it, dilute it suitably. Then spray it all over the bottom as well as the top and look for places where bubbles form.

My guess is the bouncing on the road make the whole thing like a bellows and it compresses and exhausts, decompresses and sucks, as you go down the road. Sucking air/dust in/out with every bounce.

A small 12 volt computer fan that runs off the car voltage or a solar panel with a battery for night runs could be made to give a slight positive pressure to the trailer to discourage inwards migration of dust. Of course, a good filter would be needed on the intake. You could probably make something up for a few $$, or this cannot be the first time this problem has occurred. Google finds this

http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&q=trailer+%2Bvent+%2B%22positive+pressure%22&meta=&aq=f&oq=trailer+%2Bvent+%2B%22positive+pressure%22&fp=7310e1b076ed5f89

__________________
Per Ardua Ad Astra
Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Active Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 16
#25

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 12:41 AM

Hello Ron,

Your question and my comments are giving below:

Where would the best place be to mount the intake? - Vertically as high as possible. Dust size decreases with height ie. your filter life will be more if intake is at elavated position and vice versa. (Consider maximum height permissible by rules and fouling with overhead wires / objects etc if any). Some kind of Snorkel arrangement / a simple PVC pipe would also serve the purpose of intake manifold.

Underneath? - Never. Maximum dust will be in this area.

On top? - Recommended.

In front or back? - Preferably, Back of the tow vehicle, especially facing towards Teardrop.

Besides, I feel that its is better to identify the leak points by pressurising the Teardrop from inside if the application is so critical & fix them before installing pressurizing device so that device capacity will be within limit.

Hope this will help.

Limbkar

Register to Reply
2
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#28

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 5:22 AM

You need to use what you mainly already have in your caravan carefully.

1) All caravans have a roof vent/window, often at least 40 cm x 40 cm or larger.

2) All caravans have relatively large openings in the floor (hidden under beds/cupboards) covered with fine insect screens. The law requires them. that is probably where the dust is coming in. Look around under furniture, or get under the van to see where they are.....

I open (to the rear) my roof vents at an angle to suck cool air through the caravan from the floor while travelling in "clean" conditions.

You could cover these floor vents temporarily (fiddly), or cover them with fine filter material. You cannot leave them closed when sleeping/cooking/heating the 'van.

OR:-

You could make up a stronger vent cover that you could angle towards the travel direction, covered with some filter material.....but I personally don't like that.

OR:-

I personally would shut/cover all vents to the outside in some way with easily removable covers and have a good big BIO filter from a modern car that you suck air through with a strong 12 volt fan (taking the air from as high above the road as possible, the roof vent?) and very lightly pressurize the 'van.....

The covers will need to be on the inside, with a bead of dried silicone to seal against the floor, air pressure will hopefully press them (at least on the floor) tight down....

You may not keep all the dust out but maybe 90% or better....

Fan will need to be fairly strong and use at least about a 5 amp motor. Consider a simple (NE555 circuits are all over the web) PWM controller to allow speed/pressure control.

Use a cheap replaceable "pre filter" so that the BIO filter does not get blocked too quickly.

Don't blow too hard or you will damage something!!, keep pressure differential to only say 100 millibars or less. A simple water filled clear plastic "U" tube will show the pressure difference easily and very cheaply....as long as a positive difference is measured, that will be enough, almost no matter how small......

Best of luck. let us know what you do and how well it finally works.

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
2
Power-User
United States - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Biomedical Engineering - Radiation Oncology Engineering Hobbies - Fishing - New Member APIX Pilot Plant Design Project - Member - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Popular Science - Biology - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: CT
Posts: 263
Good Answers: 1
#30
In reply to #28

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 6:30 AM

Mount the snorkel/scoop on your vehicle instead of from the trailer. This will keep the intake out of the dust/exhaust. Run a flex pipe, like a vacumm cleaner hose to the teardrop. You can filter the incoming air in a variety of ways

__________________
“Sometimes we don't even realize what we really care about, because we get so distracted by the symbols.” ? Tom Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Power-User

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Rockwell,North Carolina
Posts: 210
Good Answers: 1
#29

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 5:59 AM

I like the ideas about actually fixing the problem instead of creating more. They use this in the camper manufacturers in the US. Put pressure one the trailer and check all the windows, doors, vents and seams with soapy water. The leaks will show up and then you can fix the problem.

__________________
1.1 billion people do not have safe drinking water
Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Guru
Engineering Fields - Construction Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Civil Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United States - Member - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Latitude 38.701979 Longitude -90.439540 Coordinates 38.701979, -90.439540 N38°42.11874, W090°26.3724
Posts: 668
Good Answers: 15
#31

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 7:29 AM

How about a HEPA grade room air cleaner plugged into your electrical system while traveling. It might suck up the dust as it enters the trailer before it settles on the furniture. You'll have to clean or replace the filters on a regular basis. I'm sure there are some 12 volt versions out here or use a converter for a 110v version.

__________________
scotchdrnkr
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#32

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 8:44 AM

Put a hitch on the front of the truck and push the trailer ahead of the dust.

Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Anonymous Poster
#33

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 8:52 AM

Let's see, camping the Oregon trail on dirt roads and you have dust in your equipment?? NASA might say that is what you should expect. My father would say that it would be like doing it along with the first travelers. My mother would say if you are going to have sex on the beach, expect sand in you hand.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: I'm outa here
Posts: 1924
Good Answers: 196
#37

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 1:04 PM

My answer to high desert road dust has often been to drive slower and enjoy the scenery especially on graded roads that get like a washboard in places. Of course there are the low sandy spots where driving through fast is the only way. I do recall a stretch of the old pony express route on the south end of the Ruby mtns in eastern Nevada where fast was the only way. You don't want to try that particular place with your nice little teardrop. The only way my 2wd Toyota got through that one was because it was a moderate downhill reach most of the way (about 2 miles).

Ed Weldon

Register to Reply
Active Contributor

Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 23
#38

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 2:06 PM

A roll of 2" painters masking tape (blue, easy release), could be applied quickly prior to and removed quickly/easily from door seams after, traveling the dusty road.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#40
In reply to #38

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 5:04 PM

Marginal help as the 'van will be fitted with all these holes in the floor with insect grade wire mesh over them.....

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply
2
Anonymous Poster
#39

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/05/2010 3:41 PM

Dear Olga & Hubby, From the picture of your Teardrop Trailer & Nissan? Unit, I Immediately thought of a simple way to Lightly Pressurize your Teardrop Trailer from within your towing unit. With a (rearseat blower/heater unit) Make a Sealable Cover for the Blower Output, with a fitting that would take a 1/2" clear plastic hose out through your body near where your wiring comes out. Secure the end of this hose on a bumper bracket & install a Quick Disconnect Coupler(used regularily for Air Brakes on Semi Units), continue with the 1/2" clear plastic hose, from this Quick Disconnect Coupler, along the Teardrop Trailer frame to Enter the front of the Trailer near where the other Supply Feeds(Propane Tank line/Electrical Lightwires,etc) go in through the front wall. I would than cover the end of this line with a lite screen, just to prevent the Little Undesireabls from crawling into the New Teardrop Trailer Pressurizing Unit. The two places this line penetrates the Vehicle Body & the Trailer Body should be installed through 1/2" Rubber Body Grommets, thus securing and sealing both the Vehicle & the Trailer aswell as it ever was before the Modification. Enjoy Your Travels on Either Blacktop or Gravel Roads. P.S. I had the same Dust Problem in the Back of My Parts Van & solved it with the Idea I just Mentioned.

Sincerely, Retired Mr Fix iT.

Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Associate

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kansas USA
Posts: 47
Good Answers: 7
#41

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/06/2010 12:02 AM

I like the teardrop idea and if it was mine I would research and or try these

#1 Full width across rear bumper low mud flap on tow vehicle

in an attempt to route dust from car wheels outside of trailer footprint
this dust is usually on the rear window of todays cars
Todays suvs are not teardrop shaped like the 1949 cars or trailers
and they all have a square back end and are always covered with road dirt
and if you have an oil leak it lands on the back window too
I'm sure if you watch you'll see massive amounts of dust
hitting the front of the trailer and a full flap might reroute the dirt
and prevent positive dirty pressure on the front of trailer

#2 Wind deflector to force air down on car rear window

My old explorer had an aftermarket wind deflector at the back
of the roof luggage rack to deflect (clean) wind down on rear window

#3 Stick on vortex generators (for product names check google) are used
on semi trucks and motor homes and aircraft wings

If you have a negative pressure while towing vortex generators will
reduce the vacuum on the rear of the trailer and the whipping
(which you may have) and reduce swaying compensation wear on stirring
and impressive mileage increases they are also used on aircraft wings
Truckers stated with vgs the trailer pulls straight as a string with
large savings on new front tire replacements and stirring gear wear
Vortex generators can also improve turbulence on your tow vehicle to reduce
negative pressure on tow v and positive on the trailer front
You stick them on yourself up the side and across the top
and no I don't sell or work for these companies

I hope I have helped
John

Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 32
#42

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/06/2010 5:02 AM

All that is needed is a vacuum cleaner hose between the towing vehicle and the trailer.

The pressure provided within the car from the heater or air conditioning unit must escape somewhere, if the windows are kept shut and there is a flexible pipe to the trailer the pressure will be passed through to the trailer, escaping through the small gaps which were sucking in the dust.

As the atmosphere in the trailer will be as that of the car, should you happen to give a lift to a bunch of chain smokers you will have to sleep with the foul air.

Simple ideas only come from a simple mind.

Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kansas USA
Posts: 47
Good Answers: 7
#43

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/06/2010 11:28 AM

I'm back and after looking at your picture I see a roof vent on the trailer
I remember from my trailer pulling days the roof vent always leaked air even when closed
some times while inside just high winds would whistle through the roof vent
Basically it worked like a check valve to relieve pressure even when closed
By design or accident I don't know
But my trailers were high profile with roof vent out of blowing dirt from tow car
that could be a very high vacuum generator at road speed

If air goes out it has to replaced from somewhere

If that is the case creating a positive cabin pressure with electric blowers might
be defeated with the roof vent acting as a check valve with a vacuum on it
at road speeds

If you want to get high tech find a friend with ultrasound leak detection equipment
used in the refrigeration, pipeline trades and roofing leak detection (big $$$$)
A transmitter can be placed inside the cabin and the receiver indicates the leaks
on the outside or if a positive pressure can be applied and the ultrasound is detected
as the air whistles through the cracks
This would be a static pressure test only
But everything changes when aerodynamic drag inters the picture

I wouldn't want to be called to testify in a lawsuit about vehicle gasket leaks
I know one auto lawsuit was settled on a leaking T top with the judge
riding inside the vehicle through an automatic car wash to see if it leaked
and it did
An automatic car wash might help you if you could get the trailer inside? LOL

My interest in helping you prompted me to return to the air tabs (vortex generator)
site to watch any new videos about improving aerodynamic drag on semi trucks
and helping prevent dust entering through the back trailer doors
and to my surprise one corvette owner claimed 3 mpg increase with vgs placed
under the car on the belly pan and across the top near the rear window
Can a stick on vortex generator improve drag ratios on a vehicle that surely
has had fortunes spent on it for drag reduction research?

I'm here to learn

Thanks for helping me getting the old rusty brain wheels spinning
John

Register to Reply
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 23255
Good Answers: 418
#44

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/06/2010 3:10 PM

Interest, your trailer is aerodynamic. Bear with me this is slighly off-topic.

This reminds me of an issue reducing the boundry layer on a wing and increasing a laminar flow over the surface by using micro penetrations (Your Leaks) that basicly pulls air in reducing turbulance. But the air has to be exhausted.

How are the seals on you windows, or can you seal off you air vents. (VENTS HAVE TO BE OPEN WHEN OCCUPIED)

__________________
“ When people get what they want, they are often surprised when they get what they deserve " - James Wood
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Zambia
Posts: 30
Good Answers: 2
#45

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/07/2010 4:47 AM

The air inlet vent size would have to be substantial enough to create a positive preassure inside, situate the vent high off the ground and preferably in a stream of high air flow to increase the air flow pessure into the trailer. you would need a large capacity foam or paper filter of sorts and an assist fan to keep pressure up while you are traveling slow when there's no "air ram" to help but speed is fast enough to cause dust to lift. you would need to create a dorade box to exclude incoming rain etc ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorade_box ) . I suggest using a air fan from an automobile as they have some speed selection options and are designed to run continuously and are pitched for exactly what you want to do.

Basically you would want to mimic your car's ventilation system with all the windows closed and the fan drawing air from the outside of the vehicle and preassurizing the cabin.

Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Member

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Upper So. KA
Posts: 6
#46

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/07/2010 8:00 PM

If active pressurization is desired I'd suggest looking at the Jabsco ventilating fans.

http://www.jabsco.com/products/marine/ventilation_blowers/index.htm

The 105 CFM DC fans are used by the aforementioned off road racers to keep the dust out of their helmets and to keep themselves cool. One fan is usually enough for both occupants. Can source them from marine vendors 'raw', or can source them from someone like McKenzies with a paper filter and spun aluminum shroud attached to the inlet. I tried to find one so that I could link it direct, but didn't have much luck. I suggest calling them as they're super helpful folk and will have this component.

HTH

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7498
Good Answers: 96
#47

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 1:35 AM

First question is how often are you willing to either change or clean a filter?

Heavy trucks designed for off-road use incorporate the engine air filter as the first stage of the cab air filtration system backed up by an activated carbon and or HEPA type finisher.

Recommend use of 12v duct fan inline from the filter mounted on the trailer fed by power from the tow vehicle, put a toggle switch on dash.

In our off-road vehicles an racing buggies etc. we used K/N washable filters and Parker Pumper helmets

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 5737
Good Answers: 309
#48

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 4:42 AM

Ron,

Have you found the floor vents Andy has referred to?

__________________
We are alone in the universe, or, we are not. Either way it's incredible... Adapted from R. Buckminster Fuller/Arthur C. Clarke
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#49
In reply to #48

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 5:03 AM

Good point.

Furthermore, not only do they need sealing while running (and open when actually camping!) but you may find a whole lot of dust already collected and INSIDE the 'van, that needs to be removed before sealing for thenext dusty drive.....

These vents are often hidden away and not easy to find.....

It struck me that there is maybe a vent type that you slide a piece back and forward to seal or open that may be still easily accesible from above or below....

Although these are metal:-

http://www.inbrass.co.uk/acatalog/Closeable_vents.html

I would recommend plastic ones for "Road" usage.....but they should give you a good idea of what you need. Do not forget the fine mesh to keep out insects (and boulders)

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 39
Good Answers: 1
#53
In reply to #48

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 10:57 AM

There are no floor vents. The entire inside is a wall to wall queen size mattress. The only vent is in the ceiling which is kept tightly closed while towing on dirt roads. There is a galley in back with sink, 16 gallon pressurized water system, propane stove, ice box and drawers and shelves for storage.

The inside does have a propane furnace, DVD/TV/mp3/CD player, LCD lighting etc.

I surly appreciate all the suggestions and will try some of them for sure.

__________________
'Consider it all entertainment'
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#54
In reply to #53

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 11:10 AM

Examine the underside of the floor, I think that you will find at least an opening for the heating, maybe one for a fridge....they need to be closed off while travelling.....

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Upper So. KA
Posts: 6
#50

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 10:03 AM

A little OT here, why did my first post get rated as OT? Am I to conclude that the goal here is not to somehow pressurize the interior of the trailer to reduce/remove the dust infiltration? Perhaps my suggestion was to simple & practical?

As to using a K&N filter, Only do that if a very light coating of light oil on everything inside is acceptable. There is a reason that hot wire MAF's have trouble with K&N type filters. BT, DT....

As far as any trap doors in the floor, to the best of my knowledge that is not a requirement anywhere in the U.S. I've spent a fair amount of time in mfg'd trailers and in home builts and I can not recall ever seeing such a door/panel in any of them.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#51
In reply to #50

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 10:26 AM

I do believe that the 'van is possibly of European manufacturer (could be wrong there!) and all European 'vans must have these air vents in the floor with a fine mesh over them.

While cooking (using gas) the ventilation in the roof must be opened.

It is possible that there are no floor vents if it follows US regs, as I have no idea what US regs require.......

But if everything is sealed, how does the dust get inside?

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 39
Good Answers: 1
#56
In reply to #51

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 12:55 PM

Andy, Our Teardrop Trailer is a "Camp-Inn" made in USA. All cooking, ice box etc. are in the galley outside of the sleeping area. There are absolutely no floor vents. Yes the trailer is sealed very well BUT dust still makes its way inside. For example, our tow vehicle is a Nissan Xterra. It is so tight that when we close the doors, we feel an instant of pressure in our ears. Regardless, dust makes its way inside the Xterra. We don't mind the dust in the tow vehicle but dust in the sleeping quarters in the trailer is a different story. I guess I need to make it clear. We tow this trailer sometimes for many hours on dusty roads. I'm not talking about just a few minutes. That's why I want to pressurize the inside of the trailer while on those dirt roads. Because the dust is getting in, that means that there must be some microscopic entry points that I can not find. They may be microscopic but after several hours, a lot of dust will enter the trailer. So, by pressurizing the inside, those microscopic entry points will have air blowing outward so the dust will not enter.

__________________
'Consider it all entertainment'
Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Upper So. KA
Posts: 6
#57
In reply to #56

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 1:11 PM

The advice to take several pictures, from a suitable distance, of the truck and trailer going down a dusty road at your normal speed is an excellent one. I can vouch for how illustrative this can be. I learned that lesson watching the Land Speed Racing on El Mirage Dry Lakebed. Good and poor aerodynamics were made obvious by the dust.

Once you have those pictures, picking a location for the air inlet will become much easier. I suspect that you will still need a filter, but by placing it's inlet in "Clean Air" you'll reduce the amount of grit that it will need to filter out.

The most ideal filter will be one designed for the environ. Those made for off-highway vehicle engines would seem most appropriate to me. These can be found on Donaldson's web page: http://www.donaldson.com/en/engine/air/chart.html and likely sourced from a real auto parts store like Napa.

For positive pressure I think that you are looking at needing a ventilator fan. Those made for boat engine bay ventilation seem to me to be the best fit for the job.

Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 28
#70
In reply to #57

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

09/28/2010 8:47 AM

Hey, Friend what a nice sharing i like this, yes you are right, Air ventilator pushes the dusty and hot air out of your workplace keeping the workplace sage and cool.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#58
In reply to #56

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 3:35 PM

I mentioned a way, elaborating upon what you yourself said, to do that, using a fan and filters, you could pressurize the 'van.....

But you must not forget that your trailer, if it has gas heating, has to let air in to be burnt - somehow! You must identify how......you MUST get under the 'van with a torch and search. Until complete, I do not see how we can help you much further......

Furthermore, the teardrop forms almost an aircraft wing shape, so air pressure will be low over the roof and high under the 'Van. This alone will suck dust from outside through every tiny hole underneath, even if the heater does not need one (but I believe that it does!).....

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Upper So. KA
Posts: 6
#52

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 10:45 AM

The so-called "Tear Drop" trailers are seeing a rise in US popularity and frequently are owner-built. I only know of one mfg of such trailers, though I'm sure that there are more. This is that mfg's trailer, as re-configured and sold by a Overland oriented firm: Adventure Trailers Tear Drop

Likely the largest supporting forum for any "TD":

http://www.mikenchell.com/forums/

If it truly is the TD that I suspect that it is, cooking occurs under the rear opening hatch. The interior is reserved for sleeping and storage. It has no cooking access.

Register to Reply
Guru
Technical Fields - Technical Writing - New Member Engineering Fields - Marine Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Vancleave, Ms about 30 miles inland from Biloxi and the coast
Posts: 3197
Good Answers: 105
#55

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 11:33 AM

Any system you use that involves filters, will be a pain in the a**. Once they load up with dust, they quit working. The fan will eventually burn out. Filters can be expensive. Even if you can come up with a "positive pressure" plan, what happens when you encounter other vehicles on the road. You could be following someone who is kicking up a dust storm.

__________________
Mr.Ron from South Ms.
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7498
Good Answers: 96
#59
In reply to #55

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 4:34 PM

ronseto,

The filter I recommended #47 would require a month of daily running in a dust storm to clog, it's what they're made for and the probability of the OP driving behind another vehicle is why I posted.

I use a gauge to easily discern the filters usefulness and we knock the dirt out and with compressed air too. We've found that a cleaned slightly dirty filter filters better than a new one. Yep a new filter cost about $35 but the OP could likely use one for a couple seasons before replacement and cleaning once a month is not so bad, These filters are designed for the high air flow of 12-18 liter engine.

On bottom of the filter cannister shown is dimple vent to drain water and dust etc..shiny SS

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kansas USA
Posts: 47
Good Answers: 7
#60

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/08/2010 10:38 PM

Well I'm back and I hope you're still reading this mountain of replies
from the many good people trying to help as I have one more that is very important
I went to the builder's website and it's very informative and I hope
you have asked them about your dirt problem
but while looking at the option pictures while searching for possible air leaks
I could see many accessories mounted on the outside skin that could
be leaking as in running light fixtures, door / window gaskets, spare tire storage
electric entrance, etc and the last but the most important is and you said you
had one in a previous post the propane heater
I looked at the picture of the front of the trailer on the options page
and I have to say it scared the pee waden out of me!!
You need to have that heater checked by a factory authorized service center
for a burnt out or leaking heat exchanger

The picture states it has an intake and exhaust outlets on the front of the trailer
which means it has a sealed cumbustion chamber but if that chamber is leaking
it could be deadly and going down the road it's located in the highest pressure
and generated dirt area of the whole trailer

The heat exchanger may be burnt out or just cracked and the road vibration
or tongue and frame flexing may open a temporary crack at road speed
If it was mine I would expect to see road dirt built up there inside the intake/exhast
after a long hard pull on a dirt road every trip and if it wasn't did it go inside the cabin
through a failed heat exchanger?

Heat exchangers fail please call the furnace mfg or trailer mfg
They will listen with all ears when you mention a failed sealed combustion chamber
that is possibly allowing road dirt to enter the trailer
Not all previous owners get notified when a mfg has a recall on failed heat exs
They can tell you more and it might save your life

John

picture of trailer furnace option website link here tinycamper.com/options6.htm

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 5737
Good Answers: 309
#61
In reply to #60

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/09/2010 3:23 AM

Ahh like this?

Have you got one Ron?

__________________
We are alone in the universe, or, we are not. Either way it's incredible... Adapted from R. Buckminster Fuller/Arthur C. Clarke
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 15446
Good Answers: 953
#62
In reply to #61

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/09/2010 9:13 AM

If one looks at the original picture posted, those vents are visible.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 39
Good Answers: 1
#63

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/11/2010 11:18 PM

I want to thank everyone for their comments which ranged from some very good answers to my original question to dire death warnings. All I originally wanted was some suggestions on a good way to pressurize the cabin of my teardrop trailer to keep the dust out. Somewhere along the way the topic changed.

To those who want to know. Yes. I do have the heater option. Yes I know about Carbon Monoxide poisoning. Yes. I was aware of the connection between the inside and outside heater vents and yes I did tightly seal the heater vent both inside and outside to try to stop dust entry. Also, there are absolutely no floor vents with screens. The inside of the teardrop is wall to wall mattress. All the sealing of potential inlets didn't make any difference. The dust is coming from somewhere else.

I will try some of the ideas that were posted and give an update after our next off road trip. Thanks to everyone, Ron

__________________
'Consider it all entertainment'
Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering -

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1651
Good Answers: 71
#64
In reply to #63

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/12/2010 1:56 AM

I look forward to hearing the conclusion of your dusty travels. I only wish we had something to filter and pressurize our vehicles in Iraq, the dust there was unbelievable. When vehicles drive through it it almost acts like a fluid spraying out from your wheels.

Drew

__________________
Question: What is going on with the American's Government? Response: Who is John Galt?
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16510
Good Answers: 668
#65
In reply to #63

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/12/2010 3:44 AM

The inside of the teardrop is wall to wall mattress.

I'm liking the sound of that...mobile cat nest.
Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#66
In reply to #63

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/12/2010 6:01 AM

If you can get hold a a video camera with "Nightshot" feature or similar, that is the Sony name I believe, you can photograph Infra Red sources, but with slight mods, you can make it work even better......

To make it work REALLY well, you need to buy a special filter that blocks all light and only allows IR through. Or use a piece of black exposed camera film to block out all normal light, but let through IR.

Mask off the IR LED spotlight (my Sony Cam has one, but the light cannot easily be seen, use another camera to check if you have this or not!). if you have one, cover it with several several layers of tape. Check afterwards that it is fully blocked from emitting IR, again with another camera.

Then blow warm air (on a cold night!) into your "sealed up" 'van and photograph the outside with the specially prepared camera or a normal IR camera..... You will easily see the hot air literally GUSHING out of all the holes that you are not finding right now..... Don't forget to check UNDER the 'van too.....

Of course if you have access to an IR Camera, use that first!!!

Check out these (and more!) websites, just search on Google with "infra red :-

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/exp/make-an-infra-red-camera/

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Webcam-Into-an-Infrared-Camera

http://home.comcast.net/~zachstern/toyir/toyir.html

http://www.darvill.clara.net/emag/emaginfra.htm

And if you want to see what a Fart looks like in real life:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqCfVVkT2KI

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 15446
Good Answers: 953
#67
In reply to #66

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/12/2010 10:33 AM

Interesting images and an interesting suggestion for finding the dust entry routes. But as far as the fart IR imagery, it appears to be a staged hoax. There's an added video there called hoaxing an infrared fart that shows clearly that the temperatures are wrong, but still funny.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17996
Good Answers: 201
#69
In reply to #67

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/12/2010 11:57 AM

SPOILSPORT!!!!!

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 5737
Good Answers: 309
#68
In reply to #66

Re: Keeping the Dust Out

02/12/2010 10:36 AM

What about stage smoke bombs/pellets: I think plumbers use something similar to look for leaks too.

__________________
We are alone in the universe, or, we are not. Either way it's incredible... Adapted from R. Buckminster Fuller/Arthur C. Clarke
Register to Reply
Register to Reply 70 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

4123 (5); Andy Germany (8); Anonymous Poster (6); aurizon (1); Basco (1); bwire (3); Del the cat (3); Drew K (7); Ed Weldon (2); Energy Hunter (1); ibrianrichardsmith (1); jgroberson (3); kroni (1); Limbkar (1); lyn (6); ntsqd (4); phoenix911 (1); pwr2thepeople (1); Randall (4); redfred (6); rlindey (1); ronseto (1); rustyh2o (1); scotchdrnkr (1); Turbotroll3 (1)

Previous in Forum: Wax Coating on Lead Bullets   Next in Forum: Is Space Empty?

Advertisement