CR4® - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®


Workbench Creations Blog

Workbench Creations

Workbench Creations is the place for conversation and discussion about do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. This DIY blog will feature projects completed by its owner as well as projects completed by other do-it-yourselfers. Workbench Creations is the place where DIYers can discuss ideas, learn about what others have done, and share their expertise.

Previous in Blog: Halloween Projects Part 2   Next in Blog: Reusable Plastic Window Frames
Close
Close
Close
79 comments

Chinese Repeating Crossbow

Posted November 05, 2007 12:01 AM by Steve Melito
Pathfinder Tags: weaponology

Editor's Note: CR4 would like to thank Del the Cat for writing this story and sharing photographs of his Chinese repeating crossbow. Cheers, Del!

I built this bow about 20 years ago because I wanted to see what it would be like to shoot one. I'd seen a Chinese repeating crossbow in the Tower of London Armoury, and also seen a good description and illustrations in Sir Ralph Payne-Gallwey's book: The Crossbow mediaeval and modern, military and sporting, it's History & Management (last printed in 1976, I believe). Still, the Tower Armoury just wouldn't lend me theirs! Rather than make a slavish copy, I wanted to modernise the concept and add some innovations.

In place of the laminated bamboo bow of the original, I made a fibreglass and rock maple laminated composite bow with some re-curve (50-lb. draw weight over 8.2"). The lever angle was adjusted to improve not just the leverage, but also the smoothness of operation. The bow was mounted in a steel "shoe" that pivots on a horizontal axis parallel to the bow. It is retained by a curved, steel leaf spring which keeps the bow from twisting as the lever is worked back and forth. Again, this provides a smoother action.

There is a "catch plate" on either side of the stock so that when the magazine/barrel assembly comes back to the full draw position, a pin engages and firmly holds the assembly to stock, preventing any bounce or rattle. One of the nicest little additions I made is a tiny piece of quill from a goose feather. This projects down into the barrel in front of the bolt, preventing the bolt from sliding out of the barrel as the lever is pushed forward rapidly.

The whole repeating crossbow was made fairly quickly. The stock is made from an old walnut table top. (Don't worry: it wasn't a valuable table!) The lever is made from an ash pickaxe-handle. The steel plates are cut from sheet steel and riveted in place. The geometry of the lever arrangement was worked out using CAD (Cardboard Aided Design), cutting out the shapes, and pinning them onto a board to try different pivot positions. The sides of the magazine are ply. The magazine itself is attached to the bottom of the barrel with a brass screw at the rear and a cord binding at the front.

The "trigger mechanism" isn't really a trigger as such. Instead, it is vertical brass pin in a hole at the bottom of a groove. As the barrel/magazine is pushed forward, the string drops into this groove. The pin is pressed down by the string so that it projects below the lower surface of the barrel/magazine assembly. As the lever is pulled back, the string is drawn back to full draw. As the barrel/magazine presses back down onto the stock, the brass pin is pushed up, forcing the string from its groove and loosing the bolt which has dropped down from the magazine.

It is a delight to shoot with a remarkably light action considering the punch that my crossbow packs. I enjoy showing it to people who have never seen such a thing. They always enjoy loosing a stream of bolts into the air with six or so being airborne before the first lands!

Interestingly, I find the most comfortable way to shoot is with the crossbow's curved butt nestling across the top of the right thigh. The right hand comfortably grips the stock, and the left hand is free to work the lever. The bow can also be shot with the curved butt in the crook of the right elbow; however, this doesn't seem as comfortable. It would be wrong to conclude how the original weapons were used, but it does provide some insight.

Consider this quote from Sir Ralph Payne-Gallwey: "In the recent war between China and Japan in 1894-95, the repeating crossbow was frequently seen among troops… It is probable that the bow was very effective at stopping the rush of an enemy in the open, or for defending a fortified position. One hundred men armed with repeating crossbows could send a thousand arrows into their opponents' ranks in a quarter of a minute."

As a final note, consider that some of these bows were made with a wider magazine with a thin, central partition and a double-grooved barrel. Why? So they could shoot two arrows at a time!

Steve Melito - The Y Files

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Power-User
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Popular Science - Evolution - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 301
Good Answers: 3
#1

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/05/2007 4:19 PM

Nice article Del! I too have taken advantage of CAD when planning something out. Never knew there was such a thing, your article explained it nicely. Thumbs up!

Ken

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#2

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/05/2007 4:28 PM

Top notch Joke intended!) and the same as Mr Chevy otherwise. You learn something new every day....

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Power-User
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member

Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 139
#3

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/05/2007 7:13 PM

Take a bow Mr. Cat! Pun not initially intended.

Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sitting directly behind my keyboard in Albuquerque - USA
Posts: 592
Good Answers: 19
#4

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/05/2007 11:25 PM

Even his shadow repeats . . . . Del thinks of everything ! Brilliant.

__________________
If it eats, it's going to be trouble!
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#5
In reply to #4

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 2:19 AM

LOL ... Yup I did notice the rather 'arty' repeated shadow! (purrrly accidental)

Cheers guys.

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Hobbies - HAM Radio - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver (not BC) Washington (not DC) US of A
Posts: 1255
Good Answers: 11
#30
In reply to #5

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/09/2007 3:49 AM

OMG!!

Del has produced the M-60 Machine Bow!!!

Bill

Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#6

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:25 AM

Who needs a pistol to rob an English bank anymore......? Not our Del Boy!!!

Does the loading mechanism affect the string in any negative way even though you have I see strengthened it in that area?

I also like the way you took the time to properly finish the stock and polish it....very pretty....

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#8
In reply to #6

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 8:15 AM

The string is pretty standard, kevlar bowsting reinforced at the centre and ends with polyester whipping thread (from a yacht chandlers), as it would be on any bow string.

There would be extra friction as the lever moves up and over, but my pivoting bow mount reduces this considerably.

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Rochester NY metro area
Posts: 220
Good Answers: 18
#7

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 6:18 AM

Del, I can see it now. Our politicians here in the U.S. will soon be trampling each other in the rush to sponsor "The Del the Cat Act of 2008," banning this lethal assault weapon from our streets. With hastily called press conferences to play to the cameras in front of their rolling podiums. Or is it podia? Whatever. They'll be podiating incessantly over this grave threat to our children.

Very cool. Where can I buy one before the law passes?

jhammond

___________________________

www.patent-innovations.com

Reply
Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - pipewelder

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: North Georgia, USA
Posts: 672
Good Answers: 33
#9

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 8:44 AM

Nice article Mr. Del the Cat and very impressive fabrication skills as well. Is there any chance you could share your design via a drawing? I would really like to try my hand at building one of these bad boys myself.

pipewelder

__________________
pipewelder
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#10
In reply to #9

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 9:06 AM

I've not got any drawings..I could take some better pics with a rule alongside so you could see what's what. Easiest way is play about with some ply wood to get the basic dimensions... If there's anything specific you want I can oblige. You can always PM me for fine detail/specifics. Most of it was done with hand tools, the main pivot pin which joins the magazine/barrel assy' to the lever was turned for me (I don't have a lathe)

De

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - pipewelder

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: North Georgia, USA
Posts: 672
Good Answers: 33
#17
In reply to #10

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 1:50 PM

Thanks Del, I have a small lathe and a milling machine that I am Learning to use in my metal fab. shop . I try to find projects to make that give me machining experience so making the parts would be a learning situation for me as well. The good thing about making the bow would be that I would have something other than just a bushing or threaded rod to look at when I finished. I just finished a project where I built a small glass blowing "hot shop" to play around with. Although I pretty much suck at glassblowing I get allot of satisfaction by knowing that I can make and use my toys. Well when I get closer to completing some of my other learning projects then I might need to talk design some more with you. At any rate the article was very nice to read and I appreciate the effort you put into it.

pipewelder

__________________
pipewelder
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#12
In reply to #9

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 10:49 AM

I would appreciate the same, though I have too much on to think about making one.

Or just some nice closeup photos of the mechanical bits and a video of the action?

Preferably NOT on CR4 due to the poor quality of reproduction. Website? Emails?

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: third rock from Sol
Posts: 121
#11

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 9:17 AM

Wow, nice craftsmanship. Interesting hobby you have. Cats with x-bows... whats next

__________________
I'm not a real engineer, I just play one on TV
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#13
In reply to #11

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 10:51 AM

...I bet he didn't use Cat gut for the string!!!!!

Wikipedia:-

Catgut is the name applied to cord of great toughness and tenacity prepared from the intestines of the sheep or goat, or occasionally from those of the hog, horse, mule, pig, and donkey. Those of the cat are not employed,

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 18975
Good Answers: 336
#15
In reply to #13

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 12:41 PM

I though they used that for voilin bows strings.

__________________
phoenix911
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#16
In reply to #15

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 12:46 PM

....as well!!!

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 18975
Good Answers: 336
#14

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 12:26 PM

excellent blog and as said before take a bow Mr. Cat.

__________________
phoenix911
Reply
Anonymous Poster
#18

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 1:53 PM

thanks for the article. I have always been interested in the trigger mechanism of a cross bow and the cross bow itself, but have'nt gotten around to playing with or building one. Currently I am building a boat, however if you could send me the plans to this interesting weapon of war it would be greatly appreciated.

thank you

e-mail to BLACKSCORPION908@YAHOO.COM

Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#20
In reply to #18

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:14 PM

My first crossbow had a trigger mechanism made out of 12 gage steel wire shaped with Visegrip locking pliers and a hammer. It takes at least two pieces for an effective mechanism. The piece which holds the string, which I'll call the catch piece here, pivots. It is held back by the trigger, below, and rotates to release the string when the trigger is pulled. The trigger slides down below the catch piece to release it.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#21
In reply to #20

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:22 PM

Yup, that's pretty much a standard 'nut' type release. V effective ...

I have one on a 275lb draw bow!...the nut is made out of bar about 2" dia and rotates in a wooden socket in the stock (and is retained with twine!) rather than on a steel pivot.

The book I mentioned has diagrams of double set triggers and such like from German target bows, brilliant book if ever you get a chance to see it. It also has a big section on seige engines. Sir Ralph P G. wasn't just a collector, he restored and tested these things. He once shot a crossbow which was cocked with a windlass acroos the Menai straigts from Wales to Angelsea.. which is about 1/4 mile !

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#25
In reply to #21

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:37 PM

275lb! I used to place fiber glass rods in succession, connecting them by poly rope. I was limited by how strong my arms were and how much pressure my gut could withstand with the stock placed against my belt. Those were the days when I did all my designing originally inspired by the one real-life example which was available to me--a plastic toy dart gun.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#27
In reply to #25

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:49 PM

I once managed to cock that 275lb bow by hand ! (I had the butt against a steel pillar) it took all my strength, and I was considerably younger!...It has a lever to cock it normally...it's a poor imitation of a medieval 'light sporting bow' !

I can still draw my 70lb longbow...much to the chagrin of some of my nephews when they find they can't manage it !

When I was young and out with any of my bows, if kids wanted a go with it I always said 'if you can cock it you can have a go'.... (they never got a go)

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 18975
Good Answers: 336
#28
In reply to #27

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 4:34 PM

"When I was young and out with any of my bows, if kids wanted a go with it I always said 'if you can cock it you can have a go'.... (they never got a go)"

sounds like an excert the story from Odysseus.

__________________
phoenix911
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#29
In reply to #27

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/07/2007 12:46 PM

Light! I wouldn't doubt you had some concern about the stock slipping off the pillar. I think about those types with stirrups and imagine that thing flying up at high velocity after one fails.

I find it hard to imagine drawing one of the long bows used in the old days. I aways liked to use my 55lb recurved with no leather accessories.

Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#19

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:03 PM

Real cool, Cat!

Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#22

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:27 PM

>Interestingly, I find the most comfortable way to shoot is with the crossbow's curved butt nestling across the top of the right thigh.

Reminds me of how I used to cock the first one which I made by placing it against my leather pants belt and pulling back the string with both hands.

Del, your craftsmanship truly is superb compared to my projects!

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#23
In reply to #22

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:29 PM

cheers.

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#26
In reply to #23

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:43 PM

G'evening.

Reply
Anonymous Poster
#24

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/06/2007 3:36 PM

I have repeatedly said "if the Indians had crossbows the white man would never have landed in this hemisphere". Definitely if they had the advanced multiple firing model.

How long before the US Army will order millions of them. Think how useful a silent weapon could be, the enemy would be shot before he heard a sound.

Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member China - Member - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: CHINA
Posts: 2958
Good Answers: 14
#31

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/12/2007 12:01 AM

Our chinese call it " nu". it looks like a bow but can be shot like a modern gun.

It made up more than 2000 year ago.

chinese troop used it as a strong arm to fight with enemy in the ancient. it was used in army widely until powder was invented about 1000 years ago, it was very useful and powerful in the ancient war. just like mordern machine guns.

but in last 60's, in vetinam war, it seems often to be used by vetinam trooop which was shown in photographes.

you can view them in chinese museums. some of them are very refinement and nice.

I can send you some photo next time.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#32
In reply to #31

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/12/2007 3:29 AM

Thanks.

I didn't know they had been used in Vietnam.

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member China - Member - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: CHINA
Posts: 2958
Good Answers: 14
#33
In reply to #32

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/14/2007 1:24 AM

and it used in many minorities in china as well in old days.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Engineering Fields - Engineering Physics - New Member Engineering Fields - Nuclear Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: No. VA, USA (No, it does NOT mean "won't go"!)
Posts: 1673
Good Answers: 72
#58
In reply to #32

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

04/14/2008 9:49 AM

Del: A friend of mine, a retired B-52 Pilot, who served on the ground also, in Viet Nam (I don't know what capacity, and, unfortunately, he died of cancer about 15 years ago, so I can't ask), had a Vietnamese Montagnard cross-bow on the wall of his den. I asked him about it, and he told me it was from the highlands of Vietnam (as opposed to Laos or Cambodia). I asked a couple of US Special Forces folks I worked with at the Pentagon about them, and their experience was that the diminutive people of most of the hill tribes were as deadly with a crossbow as we would be with a rifle, owing to their very small size (the people) which made it difficult for them to work rifle of the size we use, and their tremendous stealth at tracking/stalking in the jungles they grew up in, and hunted game in, from their early youth. Others I've talked to, who didn't have any specific knowledge of their crossbow use, nevertheless concurred on their stalking abilities, and tremendous lethality in personal contact combat such as you'd find when taking out an enemy without alerting others around him to your presence. Good allies, but not the kind you'd want for enemies, especially on their own home territory. As many VC, and undoubtedly, many South Vietnamese military folks (for whom none of the Montagnard tribes had much use, due to systematic racism, and accompanying physical abuses/attacks) would have found out to their chagrin (if they survived the encounter). But I never knew until I ran into this blog, that a repeating crossbow ever existed. Of course, seeing one you've built, even only in posed pseudo-use, makes it VERY believable. And I, too, am impressed with the workmanship, the redesign (is that the Mark II, Mod 3, Block Alpha model, or am I mistaken?), and the usefulness of the design. I am a deer-hunter (so far, Rifle and Muzzle-Loader, though I do not like Muzzle-Loaders, finding them more trouble than they are worth), with intent to start bow-hunting soon (in my home state of Virginia, Bow Hunting just recently expanded to allow cross-bows, and, being fascinated by the engineering, that is what I plan to hunt with), so this cross-bow design is even more fascinating, particularly as it would allow one to get a second shot off (or more) if the first missed, whereas any powder driven firearm causes the deer inevitably to take off at the first shot, even when not aimed at the deer in your own sights. And I understand from some traditional bow-hunters I know that the sound of a bow string pushing the arrow off the rest can alert a deer in time to flinch/duck/ startle out of the path of the arrow, with time to nock and draw for a second shot almost inevitably being too long for a successful follow-up. A repeating cross-bow could even solve that problem. More venison on the table, or at least more often, in relation to the number of trips made into the field. Micah

__________________
It does not take quantum math to develop good toilets. On the other hand ...
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#60
In reply to #58

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

04/14/2008 10:18 AM

Cheers...great post.

It really grieves me that it's illegal to hunt with a bow un the UK. Even broad head arrows are illegal. (And yet the longbow was the backbone of our medieval army....)
I think we are allowed to shoot vermin, stuff like rabbit, wood pigeon and rats... but you'd use blunts for them. (I'd only ever shoot stuff for the pot)

I'm not sure if a Chinese Repeater would be suitable for hunting....no fights on the bolts, difficult to aim (as the 'barrel' moves during the cock/release action) limited power so not a very flat trajectory. A bow is certainly more sporting than a rifle and arguably more humane... ( A non lethal shot is more likely to heal cleanly if the animal isn't found)

It would be interesting to see if a compound ( you know the bow with the eccentric pulleys) repeater could be made.

The bow in that blog was the only one of those I'd made, and it looks much more crude close up, The bow mounting would also need beefing up for serious use as it would probably shake itself to bits.
I only really shoot it to show people... who are generally pretty gob smacked!

There has been some good TV showing native tribes with their bows, blowpipes and suchlike...

Regards

Del
PS..Be sure you let me know how the hunting goes...and post pics of any strange bows you encounter

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Technical Fields - Architecture - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Clemson, South Carolina
Posts: 1746
Good Answers: 20
#61
In reply to #60

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/03/2008 2:34 PM

Del,

It would be interesting to see if a compound ( you know the bow with the eccentric pulleys) repeater could be made.

Here's a picture of a compound crossbow:

Not a bad price, either! $250 US.

Found at Crossbow Hunting Pro

P. S. I like your repeater! I bought a crossbow at a local flea market, which had a bent prod, for $15. I was thinking about making a new prod instead of straightening the old one, which would require annealing and re-tempering, but I'm not particularly ambitious about it. However, such a project would yield 2 benefits: 1) I would get some satisfaction from it, and 2) my liver would get a much-needed break from consumption of too much beer!

I hope it doesn't turn out like the year-long trebuchet project I'm still working on. If I ever get that one finished, I'll post pictures.

__________________
We have met the enemy and he is us . . . Walt Kelly
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#62
In reply to #61

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/03/2008 3:23 PM

Nice!

The bent prod... what is it made of? If it's Aluminium alloy, you may get away with very carefull cold bending... it's a no loose experiment if you were going to make a new one anyway...
When I've made alluminium alloy prods it's been with a cold bend.

My projects are roofing and art at the moment..although I do have a composite prod which I made years ago which I've slimmed down a little which would be fun to mount in a stock (I only aquired the timber for a stock about 30 years ago...so it's still early days)

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Technical Fields - Architecture - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Clemson, South Carolina
Posts: 1746
Good Answers: 20
#63
In reply to #62

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/03/2008 3:39 PM

Unfortunately, it's steel, and it appears to have been made from a trailer spring. Nonetheless, it's fairly stronger than I want. The stock is aluminum and very heavy duty, so I'm not concerned about it not handling the load.

Your aged timber must be good and stable by now!

I read about a Schaun (brand name) pool cue making process that involves slow drying and rough shaping and more aging, a little more shaping, and a little more aging before final shaping.

__________________
We have met the enemy and he is us . . . Walt Kelly
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#64
In reply to #63

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/03/2008 5:06 PM

Steel from leaf springs can be cold bent...but it isn't very good any way due to the poor power to weight ratio...high bow tip inertia etc..(unless you shoot V heavy bolts)

I have a repro' 'Light Medieval Huntig bow' which I made 275lb draw weight...it needs a real heavy bolt to shoot well.

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#65
In reply to #64

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/04/2008 5:39 AM

i like heavy bolts for maximum energy transfer. It is also easier on the bow. I had once planned to make a composite bow.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#66
In reply to #65

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/04/2008 7:17 AM

Composite bow.......is that one of those complicated movements of Courtiers of the 16th Century, when meeting Royalty?

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#67
In reply to #66

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/04/2008 7:58 AM

I think you mean bough.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#69
In reply to #67

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/04/2008 9:30 AM

"!! Leaf me alone!!"

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Guru
Technical Fields - Architecture - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Clemson, South Carolina
Posts: 1746
Good Answers: 20
#68
In reply to #66

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/04/2008 8:00 AM

I had always heard actors say to one another, from the time I was a small boy, "break a leg!" Well, I never knew exactly what that phrase meant, even though I could tell that it was pretty much the same as "good luck," or something of that nature.

Anyway, I became a thespian a couple of years ago (only because a good friend of mine happened to be directing a play in a local community theater and asked me to play a character who was a suspected animal molester . . .). He also told me that he generally did not type-cast people, but that he would overlook his aversion to it at least that one time, but I digress . . .

On the evening of the first performance, one of my newly-made friends told me to "break a leg!," just as I and the rest of the cast were leaving the dressing room to go to the stage wings. Being the smart-ass that I am, I said, "I hope you die in a car wreck!" The director had to delay the opening by a couple of minutes so that the others could quit giggling long enough to start.

After the premier, I found out that the phrase, "break a leg," meant to take an awkward bow at the front of the stage when the audience applauded, virtually calling the cast out for just such a thing. The bow is made with one leg stretched out in front and the other slightly bent at the knee whilst one's left arm is placed directly behing the back opposite one's right arm folded at one's waist as one tries to bend slightly at the waist so as to appear to be bowing to the audience. Not easy for someone as crippled as I. The bent leg part of the whole affair is the instigator of the phrase, "break a leg," and it was meant to mean, "I hope you are called out after the play by the audience to stage front to be further applauded."

I think the phrase became popular back in Shakespeare's time and the "complicated movements of Courtiers of the 16th century (or before), when meeting royalty" is the same complicated bow that actors make to this day at the end of a performance!

__________________
We have met the enemy and he is us . . . Walt Kelly
Reply Off Topic (Score 4)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#70
In reply to #68

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

06/04/2008 9:31 AM

GA

Today has been good, I have learnt several new things, this was one of them. Many thanks.

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Technical Fields - Architecture - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Clemson, South Carolina
Posts: 1746
Good Answers: 20
#76
In reply to #61

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

09/06/2010 6:12 AM

Well, I finally finished my trebuchet, and I'm already modifying it!

__________________
We have met the enemy and he is us . . . Walt Kelly
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#77
In reply to #76

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

09/06/2010 7:22 AM

Excellent, I'll look forward to hearing how she goes.
Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member China - Member - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: CHINA
Posts: 2958
Good Answers: 14
#34

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/14/2007 1:34 AM

Is he you? why dont make some other interest toy?

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#35
In reply to #34

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/14/2007 2:37 AM

I make plenty of interesting stuff... there are a few of my things scattered about CR4! (Solar panels, model seige engine, long bow, Deer sculpture, paintings...)

I'm saving some of it for another time ...I don't want to become a bore !

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member China - Member - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: CHINA
Posts: 2958
Good Answers: 14
#36
In reply to #35

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/15/2007 11:29 PM

Hi, Del the cat, you must mistake my mind.

The guy works very hard at his crossbow, not other things.

you are still an artist. Im interested in your painting showing above as well.

I enjoy the pictures.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#37
In reply to #36

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/16/2007 2:50 AM

Thanks

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member China - Member - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: CHINA
Posts: 2958
Good Answers: 14
#38
In reply to #37

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/16/2007 3:25 AM

can you introduce me more about painting web site?

I may come to that.

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#39
In reply to #38

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/16/2007 3:41 AM

I don't know any painting websites...I just posted my stuff on CR4 because it related to a previous articles about an old factory...

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 441
Good Answers: 20
#40

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/21/2007 10:49 AM

Amazing! Del thank you for such an informative article. Did the Chinese also posion the tips of the bolts?

The evolution of "toxic weaponry" is interesting from the antiquities of poisoning to the present day threat of "dirty bombs". You've started me digging in Google again LOL.

__________________
intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them ~ Einstein
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#41
In reply to #40

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/21/2007 12:40 PM

I believe they did use poison as the weapon isn't as powerful as other bows, and due to the limitations of the magazine the heads can't have a large cutting area.

The whole topic of arrow head design subject is fairly broad (pun intended!) what is good for penetrating armour isn't so lethal and a big cutting head won't penetrate armour. hunting arrows kill by hemorrhage, and if they don't kill the wound may well heal cleanly, unlike a firearm which kills by trauma and can leave horrible non-fatal injuries.

Apparently a hunting arrow wound isn't too painful (as reported by and idiot who went around behind an animal while his friend shot at it!... he felt something hit his leg..looked down and saw an arrow sticking out of his thigh!)

I still wouldn't fancy being on the receiving end. I must admit I would like to time travel back to Agincourt to witness the size of the arrow storm that was thrown up. (I'd doubtless want to come back PDQ tho'...)

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Power-User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 441
Good Answers: 20
#42
In reply to #41

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 11:13 AM

"Agincourt", I haven't heard of that place since my eighth (or ninth) grade history class. We studied lots of English history at the time. Battles at Agincourt and Hastings were the two most remembered.

You bring up an interesting idea regarding the penetrating qualities of certain arrow heads. I suppose the broad bladed points would have a lower velocity because of aerodynamic drag whereas arrows with the small diameter heads would have a higher velocity thus allowing the penetration of armour.

The English longbow was the most feared weapon at the time of Agincourt. What velocity could an arrow be propelled by the longbow? I'm curious if it was capable of hurtling an arrow faster than the crossbow at that time.

Del, you certainly are talented. I'll add these photos of your Chinese crossbow to my random screen saver photo file where your wonderful paintings often pop up and brighten my day.

__________________
intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them ~ Einstein
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#43
In reply to #42

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 11:18 AM

Velocity is of course an important factor, but even more important is the kinetic energy in the arrow and the surface area of the head and its penetration capabilities, already discussed elsewhere....

Basically what we are saying that a heavy arrow traveling at say 300mph penetrates better than a light arrow traveling at the same speed......all other factors being the same.

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#44
In reply to #42

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 12:50 PM

The whole crossbow/Longbow debate is fraught with problems as it's not really comparing like with like.

As a very broad statement the crossbow was more suited to defence or as a sniper's weapon, there were some very heavy draw weights using steel bows drawn back with a windlass. An example of such a siege bow was re-furbished by Sir Ralph Payne-Gallwey. Draw weight over 1/2 a ton...length of draw 7", he shot a bolt across the Menai Straights (from Wales to Angelsea) a distance of between 440 and 450yards.

This would be more powerful than those carried at Agincourt but of similar construction.

The key thing about the longbow was the number of archers their organisation, discipline and tactical deployment. Add in the fact that the arrows would certainly make a horse uncontrollable, kill or disable a lightly armoured man and could even penetrate the best armour. The rate of shooting isn't as critical as is generally imagined, it wasn't a race to use up all the arrows, which would need to be replenished from the baggage train presumably..maybe by runners?

The bodkin point is strong enough and has a small square cross section which would penetrate the armour.

The velocity of an arrow with bodkin point from a 70lb longbow has been measured at ~55m/s (from Robert Hardy's excellent book 'Longbow') bear in mind the bows at Agincourt were probably nearer 150lb draw weight!! (estimated from tests on bows from the Mary Rose (I've seen these in Portsmouth...V impressive).

As Andy says..it's a trade off of mass and velocity, good old 1/2 mv2 Like many things in engineering it's about power matching, in this case the arrow to the bow. The heavy steel bow of a crossbow may not generate the expected velocity because of the mass of the bow limbs, but of course it can shoot a heavier bolt (arrow).

I'd better stop now...I could ramble on about this stuff for ages.

PS. If you ever come to England...Portsmout is worth a visit to see HMS Victory (Nelson's flagship) and the Mary Rose.

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#49
In reply to #44

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 4:01 PM

Being an EX RN Man, I know Portsmouth from long ago, I must get there and see the Mary Rose though....

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
United States - US - Statue of Liberty - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Gone to Alabama with my banjo on my knee...
Posts: 5604
Good Answers: 20
#56
In reply to #44

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

03/31/2008 3:31 PM

And isn't the clipper Cutty Sark there as well? I seem to recall that from my visit there in 1971.

__________________
Veni, vidi, video - I came, I saw, I got it on film.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#45
In reply to #42

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 1:09 PM

Whoops, I didn't answer your question...!

The crossbow would have greater velocity and range...

The French had fewer crossbowmen, badly deployed.

The real story of the battle is one of tactical ineptitude by the French who were disorganised and virtually fighting each other for the 'honour' of being at the front! They were drawn into a battle on unsuitable ground for mounted knights...they were provoked into this by advanced archers sending lighter arrows into their midst goading them into advancing into a bottle neck.

Was this tactic just a 'long shot'? (pun intended as archery may well be the origin of this expession)

PS. I recently heard that the V sign story of the French cutting off captured archers fingers is a 19th century myth...(anyhow..I don't think they caught many archers!)

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Hobbies - HAM Radio - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver (not BC) Washington (not DC) US of A
Posts: 1255
Good Answers: 11
#46
In reply to #42

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 1:10 PM

Del might be able to comment on this bit of trivia. I forget where I picked it up but...

The middle finger is necessary to fire the long bow. When the French would capture English troops, they would amputate the middle fingers of the captives, so they could no longer use this weapon.

When the English were about to do battle, they would hold up there middle fingers for the French to see, in effect saying "Hey!! I got mine so Beware!!" This gesture lives with us today, only in a more sexual connotation.

Bill

Reply
Guru
Safety - Hazmat - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Engineering Fields - Transportation Engineering - New Member Popular Science - Evolution - New Member Technical Fields - Procurement - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Popular Science - Cosmology - New Member Engineering Fields - Architectural Engineering - New Member Technical Fields - Marketing/Advertising - New Member Engineering Fields - Food Process Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Mariposa Ca
Posts: 5864
Good Answers: 114
#47
In reply to #46

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 1:26 PM

The story I heard ended with

Pluck Yew!

refering to the type of wood used to make bows

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#48
In reply to #46

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 1:28 PM

Yup..see The PS in my previous reply. Ot was on TV the other day a program called QI (quite interesting) where they said it was a 19th century myth...

PS. If I am allowed to be pedantic you can't 'fire' a bow... there is no fire involved...that is reserved for 'firearms'... you 'shoot' a bow

Cheers

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Engineering Fields - Engineering Physics - New Member Engineering Fields - Nuclear Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: No. VA, USA (No, it does NOT mean "won't go"!)
Posts: 1673
Good Answers: 72
#59
In reply to #42

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

04/14/2008 10:04 AM

Del and Andy talked about two important points (pun intended) concerning the answer to your question about penetration of different point types, but throw in a third critical factor, which is the cross-section of the point. Given an impact velocity of 500 feet per second, and a throw weight of 2 ounces, its easy to calculate the kinetic energy at impact, but not, without knowing cross-sectional area, what the penetration capabilities could be, nor how deformation of the mass behind the head might affect the impact point. It is probably easiest to see the difference if you consider how impact would spread across a bolt tip that had a flat face, and 1 inch square in cross-sectional area, as opposed to one that was pointed, nowhere wider in cross-section than 1/4 inch diameter, and weighed the same. The first might knock the target flat, with broken ribs, while the second might travel clear through the same target. The difference in impact force distribution can best be likened to the damage a hammer does to your thumb, versus the damage a nail would do to the same thumb, hit with the same hammer. One bruises, and possibly breaks bones. The other nails your thumb to the board. But if a very slender bolt is used to drive the flat faced bolt head, the impact may be transferred in large part back into the "whipping" of the bolt shaft as the head absorbs the impact. Or if a very thick bolt (in relation to the narrow bolt head) is used, it may cause initial deep penetration, but stop short of through-and-through, because the thickness of the shaft may cause enough friction in the initial entry point to waste much of the energy in dragging the bolt to a stop ENOUGH!! Like Del, I can go on forever. Unlike Del, I will, if someone doesn't put a sock in it for me. Micah

__________________
It does not take quantum math to develop good toilets. On the other hand ...
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
United States - US - Statue of Liberty - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Gone to Alabama with my banjo on my knee...
Posts: 5604
Good Answers: 20
#55
In reply to #41

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

03/31/2008 3:25 PM

Hmmm...I once had an abscess on the upper lobe of my left lung. This caused extreme fluid buildup which had to be drained. The drainage tubes were inserted by putting stainless steel rods inside, and those were then jabbed sans anaesthetic into the pleural cavity. They looked for all the world like arrows, and upon insertion, there was surprisingly little pain. I suspect one could be punctured by several arrows and still be somewhat functional - for a short while at least. And presuming no vital organs were directly involved.

Mind you, this is neither a recommendation nor an endorsement!

__________________
Veni, vidi, video - I came, I saw, I got it on film.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: 30°30'N, 97°45'W, Elv: 597 ft.
Posts: 2432
Good Answers: 10
#50

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/28/2007 7:14 PM

Crap. Thats what it is plain outdated crap!


ok, ok, ok! It is awesome. I am very jealous and it is an envious accomplishment. Old English cat. Harumph!

__________________
I never apologize. I'm sorry that's just the way I am.
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#51
In reply to #50

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/29/2007 3:46 AM

MR Rummel, you are also guilty of the "C" word, I tried to figure out your location in this world and the coordinates you have given are slightly wrong.

In the longitude you have given 75 minutes, well as there are only 60 minutes in a degree, this is patently wrong.

So I am guessing here, but it appears that you may have given the decimal values as minutes, so I used the two values as decimal:-

30.5N and 97.75W

And I have your position as being just north of Austin Texas.....am I as near as you want me to be? Or completely off?

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#52
In reply to #51

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/29/2007 3:58 AM

DONT TELL HIM!!!

His remote controlled death ray is coordinate controlled

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
United States - US - Statue of Liberty - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Gone to Alabama with my banjo on my knee...
Posts: 5604
Good Answers: 20
#57
In reply to #52

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

03/31/2008 4:30 PM

Quite unlike your manually-controlled death crossbow, which I presume is eyeball-ly controlled (if at all...)! Beautiful piece of work, BTW! SALUTE!

__________________
Veni, vidi, video - I came, I saw, I got it on film.
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: 30°30'N, 97°45'W, Elv: 597 ft.
Posts: 2432
Good Answers: 10
#53
In reply to #51

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/29/2007 10:00 AM

You are absolutely correct about my location. Just North of Austin. As to the coordinates. What an embarrassing little fudge that is! I have typed a 7 where a 4 should be (please note their proximity to one another on the 10 key).

I appreciate your keen observation, with my background there is absolutely no reasonable excuse for this error. Leave it top you of the feline avatar persuasion (DTC too) to expose my mistake.

__________________
I never apologize. I'm sorry that's just the way I am.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 17936
Good Answers: 196
#54
In reply to #53

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

11/29/2007 4:49 PM

Hey, you have even corrected it, great.

I have used your example and added my close to my house, but not exactly! the coordinates. I have used the decimal version, why?, well most of the sites where you can key in a coordinate and look where it is use decimal, instead of minutes and seconds.....

Thats the only reason.

Minutes and seconds still look better!!!

__________________
"What others say about you reveals more about them, than it does you." Anon.
Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Anonymous Poster
#71

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

09/10/2008 2:18 PM

fbffb

Reply
Anonymous Poster
#72

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

12/07/2008 6:04 PM

plans ad the plans to the site

Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#73
In reply to #72

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

12/07/2008 6:35 PM

It doesn't need plans, the pictures and text tell the story.
You can work out dimensions from the pictures.
Make a bow and then scale everything from the drawlength of the bow .
And use some of that CAD.... the cardboard sort.

Of course the actual bow design is a whole topic on it's own. That particular bow is a composite of fibreglass and rockmaple made ages ago, so I no longer have the dimensions. You could use any bow to make a rough version to experiment with. I find that's the best way to make anything. I call the technique WAQAP (wrong as quick as possible... as opposed to 'right first time' which is a 'con' )
We learn by doing.

A miniaturist friend of mine made a 1/4 scale of one which worked perfectly with a bamboo bow. Scale models are much quicker to make than a full size one...some people don't believe this until I point out it's much easier to cut through 1/8" steel than 1/2" steel .

Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Guru
United States - US - Statue of Liberty - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Gone to Alabama with my banjo on my knee...
Posts: 5604
Good Answers: 20
#74
In reply to #73

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

12/23/2008 5:12 PM

And it's tons easier to scale up than to scale down IMNSHO. CAD = Cardboard Architectural Design, correct?

__________________
Veni, vidi, video - I came, I saw, I got it on film.
Reply
Anonymous Poster
#75

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

02/02/2010 7:16 PM

¶thats so not cool

Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Associate
Engineering Fields - Construction Engineering - New Member United States - Member - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Rocky mountains U.S.
Posts: 50
Good Answers: 4
#78

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

01/19/2013 7:37 AM

WOW Del pretty cool do you have a video of you shooting this?

__________________
Most problems have simple low tech solutions
Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Harlow England
Posts: 16275
Good Answers: 631
#79
In reply to #78

Re: Chinese Repeating Crossbow

01/19/2013 9:26 AM

Google 'Delsbows' to see my website, theres a link to it on there.
Del

__________________
health warning: These posts may contain traces of nut.
Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 79 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

Andy Germany (12); Anonymous Poster (5); Bill (4); Bob B. (1); cnpower (5); Common cents (1); Del the cat (21); electrone (8); EnviroMan (4); Garthh (1); Hellcat (1); jhammond (1); micahd02 (2); MrChevy (1); PetroPower (1); phoenix911 (3); pipewelder (2); Sciesis2 (2); taejonkwando (2); TexasCharley (2)

Previous in Blog: Halloween Projects Part 2   Next in Blog: Reusable Plastic Window Frames

Advertisement